Plainfield Garden Club








Member: Detwiller, Mrs. Charles Henry (Catherine or "Cath" Campbell), Jr. '57

Address from 1952 - 1980: Clarke's Lane, Plainfield

1981 - 1986 Address: 75 Giggleswick, Edison

1987 Address: 7 Skinequit Rd, PO Box 386, South Harwich, Mass 02661

1984 - 1987: Active
1988 - 2012: Affiliate
2012: Resigned
October 2012: Given "Honorary" status


Daughter of Mrs. William Hall (Mabel C. Raper) Campbell '28

Sister iof Mrs. F. Edgar (Dorothy Campbell) Davis '60

Also related to Miss Laura Detwiller '32

January 5, 2011

A large envelope from Cath Detwiller arrived as a very special New Year's present for all the PGC. Below are the contents.

1958

Black and white photo of a large arrangement in a niche

Just barely seen on the pedestal "Second Prize" and "International Flower Show"

1958

Back of the photo reads:

Detwiller
2nd Prizw
D8527
1958

Photo by
John Hugelmeyer
211 E. 33 St. * N. Y. 16, N. Y. * MU 5-3326
THIS PHOTO FOR PERSONAL USE OR EXHIBITION ONLY. NOT TO BE SYNDICATED OR REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF JOHN HUGELMEYER

1958

Front of the envelope is blank. On the back there is a handwritten message:

D8527
Sorry about the bottom of the container but I got it all in my picture & the trimmer cut and mounted them wrong.

John Hugelmeyer

Western Union Telegram Mar 12 1958

Front of the telegram envelope.

Stamped Mar 1958 2:30 AM PLAINFIELD N.J.

PRAY FOR PEACE .03 cent stamp

Handwritten: Detwiller 1958

Back of the 1958 telegram

WESTERN UNION TELEGRAM

On any Occasion it's Wise to Wire

1958 March 12 17:23 AM

WESTERN UNION TELEGRAM
W.P. Marshall, President

Symbols:
DL = Day Letter
NL = Night Letter
LT = International Letter Telegram

PA004 SPC272 AA891
A CNA539 NL PD=YH CHARLESTON SO CAR 11 =
MRS CHARLES H DETWILLER =
CLARKS LANE PLAINFIELD NJER=

CONGRATULATIONS JUST GOT NEWYORK PAPER ONLY YOU COULD
DO IT UPSIDE DOWN SO QUICKLY WE ARE BOTH THRILLED
BECAUSE WE KNEW YOU COULD DO IT ALL OUR LOVE =
CONNIE AND HAZEL

[EDITOR'S NOTE: The guess is that "Connie" is Connie Foster and "Hazel" is Hazel Lockwood

article from "the New York paper"

GARDEN CLUB MEMBER WINS PRIZE AT SHOW

Mrs. Charles H. Detwiller of the Plainfield Garden Club won second prize yesterday at the 41st International Flower Show in the New York Coliseum for her entry in the Novice Class, Arrangement Suitable for a Terrace.

Her entry was an arrangement of cedrus atlantica glauca, blue anemones and silver gray rex begonia foliage in a black iron urn. Mrs. Detwillers' home is in Clarke's Lane, Scotch Plains

White envelope

Inside a white envelope was a black and white photograph and a small note:

1/2/11 My parents' garden is listed in the archives of The Garden Club of America at the Smithsonian.

Catherine's parents are Mr. and Mrs. William Hall Campbell. Mrs. Campbell (Mabel C. Raper Campbell '28) was a member of the Plainfield Garden Club. We have a record of their address as "North Plainfield 1915" and the last listing of Mrs. Campbell in the year 1953.

The photograph is titled:
"Hillcrest" Residence and Grounds of William H. Campbell, Hillcrest Road

Hillcrest, Watchung, NJ

Note with Photo

Envelope: Plainfield Garden Club at International Flower Show N.Y. Coliseum - 2nd Prize

PRIZE GARDEN

Caption under black and white photograph:

PRIZE GARDEN – Winner of the second prize in the gardens class of the International Flower Show in the New York Coliseum was the mosaic garden created by the Plainfield Garden Club. The show continues through Saturday.

No date on evelope or article, but article mentions Mrs. MacLeod as President and she served from 1958 - 1960

Award to Garden Club Result of Hard Work

circa 1958 - 1960

by Mrs. William P. Elliott
(Exhibitions Chairman)
Plainfield Garden Club

The second prize awarded to the Plainfield Garden Club this week for te mosaic garden it staged at the International Flower Show in the New York Coliseum was not easily won. Our entry was the product of three months of concentrated effort.

Those who see our exhibit at the show, which opened Saturday and will remain open through Saturday, often ask: "How does one go about such a project."

This is how we did it. Our story starts with the arrival just before Christmas of the Garden Club of America's schedule of classes for the show. We studied it and decided to attempt an entry in the gardens class.

The requirements were: "Four competitive pool plantings, mosaic in design, Flowers and ground cover to be used. Flowers to be predominate. Color combinations, white-yellow, apricot, brown and green. Space approximately 10 feet by five feet. Free form shape. Plant material not to exceed two feet in height from the floor."

Committee Begins Work

As soon as our application was accepted, the committee I headed set to work. Our dedicated members were Mrs. F. Willoughby Frost, Mrs. Linden Stuart, Mrs. Alden de Hart, Mrs. Victor King, Mrs. Charles Detwiller and Mrs. Harry Brokaw Smith.

We conducted research in museums and libraries to find out everything possible about mosaics (both ancient and modern), their designs and techniques.

Trips to greenhouses followed. Our investigation of plant materials available caused us to travel many miles in New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania. Incidentally, there are no finer people to deal with than the nurserymen we met.

The next stop involved our spending many hours with pencil and paper. Finally, we decided to use a design created by Mrs. Frost. Her inspiration was a picture of a mosaic walk in Alicante, Spain, which had been brought back by one of our members, Mrs. David Foster, who recently traveled there.

Mechanical Problems

We then put our "theories" into practice by working with sample plant materials on patterns cut to scale in order to determine the amounts of plant material required and the amount of real moss necessary to fill the given space. We also faced the mechanical problmes of "putting it together."

Then, followed the problem of transporting all our precious materials to the Coliseum March 3. Fortunately, we were able to find a wholesale florist in Scotch Plains who could provide a heated truck and a driver.

The morning of March 8 finally arrived, and with it the snow. What a blizzard that was! In spite of it all, however, our courageous driver collected and loaded the plants and other materials into the truck and set forth to battle the elements en route to the city. We are grateful to him for their safe arrival.

Meanwhile, our president, Mrs. Robert F. MacLeod, had braved the storm to drive to New York to receive our precious cargo upon its attival at the Coliseum. After her job was done, storm and traffic conditions made it impossible for her to return to Plainfield, and she had to spend the night with friends in the city.

Five of us left Plainfield at 7 a.m. the next day and, after a slow but safe drive, reached the Coliseum in time to take the final steps in our project. By 6 p.m. we were finished in more ways than one.

The Courier News

Handwritten note: Dec. 16, 1972 My tree from Rumson Show

Caption next to photograph:

Cathy Getter, 3 1/2, inspects an authentic Victorian Christmas tree which will be on display tomorrow from 2 - 5 p.m. at an open house at the Drake House, Plainfield. The tree is trimmed with antique ornaments as well as handmade papier mache objects d'art, decoupaged angels, cherubson framed mirrors. Candles on tin candlesticks provide the illumination.

Envelope: Cath Detwiller May 1975

Inside this envelope were two ribbons attached to cards and one small photograph of an arrangement with fruit. The container seems to be a copper fondue pan or heater stand for a food container.

FIRST PRIZE
The Plainfield Garden Club
May 21, 1975

TRI COLOR
(Best in Show)
The Plainfield Garden Club
May 21, 1975

Photograh of arrangement: PGC May 1978 Grace Church

Photograh of arrangement: PGC May 1978 Grace Church

American Victorian Antique Paper Ornaments Living Douglas Fir Rumson Show 1972

Original

First Prize
Popular Vote

Secon Prize
Judges Award

Cath Detwiller

American Victorian Antique Paper Ornaments Living Douglas Fir Rumson Show 1972

copy of original

Cath Detwiller

Fall 1998 portrait of Cath Detwiller

Back of the portrait

1951 Drawing of John S. Harberger home by Charles H. Detwiller

Discovered in the archives of the Historical Society of Plainfield, an astonishing 1951 rendering by architect Charles H. Detwiller, Jr. of the post-1864, fully-Victorianized summer home of banker John S. Harberger illustrates Plainfield's storied past. Within the elablorate complex lies the humble, 1746, four-room farmhouse of pioneer Nathaniel Drake. Courtesy of the Historical Society of Plainfield

From Plainfield, New Jersey's Historical Past and Present by John Grady and Dorothe Pollard

Drake House

circa 2010

Rutgers University Library

Detwiller, Charles H.
Architectural papers, 1927 and 1952-1983.

Manuscript Collection 1104
Special Collections and University Archives
Rutgers University Libraries

QUANTITY: ca. 7.6 cubic ft. (5 cartons, 2 newspaper boxes, 9 map folders)
ACCESS: No restrictions.
PROCESSED BY: Mitchell Greenberg


Biographical Sketch
Scope and Content Note
Arrangement Note
Container List

Biographical Sketch
Charles H. Detwiller, Jr., restoration architect, chair of the New Jersey chapter of the American Institute of Architects' committee on historic preservation and an officer of the New Jersey Chapter of Architectural Historians, was graduated from Princeton University in 1939. He received further education at the Brooklyn School of Design and Construction, from which he was graduated in 1950. The son of Charles Detwiller, Sr., an architect in Plainfield, New Jersey, Charles Jr. had his office in Plainfield as well. His father, having once walked him around the former family homestead near Allentown, Pennsylvania, to "point out a pretty cornice," succeeded in sparking a passion in him at age 11 for architecture specifically dealing with older buildings.

His first recorded historical restoration project was the Drake House (circa 1747), Plainfield, the interiors of which Detwiller worked on in 1950. The next major project, in 1961, was the Stage House Inn (circa 1837), Scotch Plains, which involved not only restoration but house moving. Other important projects were the Mystic Maritime Museum (circa 1810), Mystic, Connecticut, which entailed new construction in period style, the Badgley House (circa 1710-40), Mountainside, which he measured and prepared a proposal to reconstruct, and the Old Red Mill Museum and Historic Village in Clinton, new construction in period style.

Detwiller also did consulting work with ten different historical societies throughout New Jersey and, in conjunction with a variety of engineering firms, advised on the cultural impact of major highway extensions in northern and central New Jersey (I-287, I-78 and Route 55).

Of Detwiller's children, two (Frederic and Charles III) also became architects.


Scope and Content Note
The papers of restoration architect Charles H. Detwiller, Jr., MC 1104, span the years 1952 to 1983, with the bulk of them falling between 1976 and 1983. They are filed in two series (sequences) as received: 1) documentation relating to individual historic buildings and historic districts for which Detwiller provided professional services (e.g., Buccleuch Mansion, Crescent Avenue Historic District), about which he was contacted (e.g., Ivy Hall) or in which he had an interest (e.g., Hiram Market); and 2) documentation of major highway extension plans and surveys and their environmental impact on historic buildings (i.e., I-287, which comprises the bulk of this series, and I-78 and Route 55), plus major sewer facility expansions and their impact (e.g., Franklin Borough). Also filed in the second series, as found, are papers concerning one additional historic district for which Detwiller provided consulting services (Old Bridge) and notes from a 1980 historic restoration conference.

The majority of the papers in the first series detail Detwiller's activities inspecting and suggesting appropriate improvements to New Jersey buildings dating from as early as the 18th century. Parallel to these activities Detwiller appraised the likelihood of various buildings qualifying for federal or state "historic landmark" status and attendant benefits (financial aid in restoration, tax reduction). His role in restoration was thus not only to tastefully preserve but also to follow guidelines set forth by the National Park Service (its National Register for Historic Places) and the New Jersey Historic Sites Commission. The remainder of the papers in the first series reflect Detwiller's involvement in preservation campaigns where developers had bought up certain properties (Blenheim Hotel, Hiram Market), researching the history of previous ownerships and restorations on certain buildings (Denville survey) and various other activities relating to buildings or districts.

The second series consists mainly of I-287 extension plans, 1977-1983. This project was seen in its various alternate proposals to affect many houses in early settled parts of northern New Jersey extending from Montville to the New York state border. Detwiller was employed by the architectural and engineering firm of Louis Berger & Associates, Inc., East Orange, to assess the historical value of buildings in and near the path of this highway. He played the same role in the 1978 Route 55 project (under the auspices of the Environmental Assessment Council, New Brunswick) and the 1975 I-78 project (for URS Madigan-Praeger, Inc., of New York City).

The Detwiller papers provide an excellent overview of efforts to preserve New Jersey's heritage through restoration methods and materials that are in keeping with original architecture. The collection also provides a glimpse into the difficulties of nonpartisan appraisal of buildings that lie in the path of proposed construction projects.

The papers consist of correspondence, notes, photographs, Detwiller's reports on individual structures (evaluating age, style, significance, condition, etc.), bid specifications, architectural drawings, construction contracts, bills for services rendered, printed matter (maps, pamphlets, catalogs, periodical issues, government documents, newspaper clippings, photocopies from county histories, blueprints, aerial photographs, etc.), photocopies of deed book entries, contract archaeology reports and a variety of brochures. Also included are a fragment of hand-painted wallpaper, paint chips and more than one rusty nail.


Arrangement Note
The Charles H. Detwiller, Jr., architectural papers are arranged in two series (filing units), one consisting of individual building and district surveys and the other of highway extension proposals and district surveys. The documents were received by Special Collections and University Archives in these two groupings. Most of the folders in the first series were labeled with the names of either areas or buildings, although not all of the building names correspond to current usage. Some folders (ten or so) retained the owner's names since the buildings themselves had no names as such. A very few folders lacked headings and were supplied them; these headings appear in bracketed form on the folders. The second series, in contrast, contained many unlabeled, vaguely labeled or mislabeled folders. While the unlabeled and mislabeled folders were provided bracketed "Miscellaneous" headings (among the I-287 subseries), the vague headings were transferred as they appeared to the new folders–with the result that many related materials in this series are found scattered between folders without any clear rational.

Most oversize blueprints from the first series were segregated, their corresponding folder headings copied on larger folders, and put in newspaper boxes. An asterisk next to a folder number on the container list indicates that an oversize blueprint has been shifted in this manner.

Maps, blueprints, topographic surveys and aerial photographs from the second series, and some blueprints from the first series, were transferred to a map case drawer due to their very large size. These documents are listed at the end of the container list.


Container List
BOX FOLDER CONTENTS

1 1 List of Surveys of Historic Sites by C.H. Detwiller or A.I.A.
(1) INDIVIDUAL BUILDING PROJECTS AND DISTRICT SURVEYS
2* Acorn Hall (Morristown), 1978-1979
3 Badgley House (Mountainside), 1972-1980
4 Basking Ridge Historical Society (Basking Ridge, Bernards
Township), 1976
5 Berkeley Heights Historical Society (Berkeley Heights
Township), 1977-1980
6 Blenheim Hotel (Atlantic City), 1978
7 Buccleuch Mansion (New Brunswick), 1979
8* Burrows Mansion (Matawan), 1977-1981
9* Carriage House–Clinton Curtis (Morristown), 1979
10* Clinton Historical–Grandin Library (Clinton), 1977-1978
11 Clinton Museum–Bids and Other Data, 1978-1979
12* Clinton Museum–Old File–"Red Mill 5," 1964-1965
13-18* Clinton Museum, 1978-1980
19-22* Crescent Avenue Historic District (Plainfield), 1980-1981
23 DiMiceli, J. (Scotch Plains Township), 1979
24 Denville Survey (Denville), 1979-1980
25 Diver, C. (Avon), 1980
26 Diver's House (Avon), 1980
27 Durrand-Hedden House (Maplewood), 1979
28* Eld, Wendell (Lamington, Bedminster Township), 1973
29 Elizabeth, City of–Cultural Resource Study, 1980
30 Elliott, W.P.–Old Stansberry House (Scotch Plains Township),
1977
31 English Neighborhood Historical Society (Maywood), 1979
32 "Eoff" Farmstead–R. Brooks & Associates (Pluckemin,
Bedminster Township), 1977-1979
33* Facade Program, 304-308 Front St. (Plainfield), 1979
34* Facade Program, 435 Park Avenue (Plainfield), 1979
35-38* Friends Meeting House (Plainfield), 1954-1980

*For related oversize material, see boxes 6 and 7

BOX FOLDER CONTENTS

2 INDIVIDUAL BUILDING PROJECTS AND DISTRICT SURVEYS [continued]
1 General Historic Site Survey Evaluation, 1980
2 Gladis, Joseph W. (Westfield), 1978
3 Glen Ridge Historical Society, 1977
4 Goett–Lake Avenue (Clark), 1979
5* Gutherz Research Property (Oldwick, Tewksbury Township), 1979
6 Gural–Old Coach Road (Summit), 1979
7 Hartman, Lois (Georgetown, Mansfield Township), 1980
8-10* Highland Falls (Highland Falls, New York), 1979-1980
11 Historic American Buildings Survey–Library of Congress,
1969-1977
12 Hoser House Restoration (Harmony Township), 1981
13 Hillside Historical Society, Inc., 1978-1979
14 Ivy Hall [Cornelius Low House] (Piscataway Township), 1979
15 Jersey City–City Hall, 1979
16 Johnson & Johnson–Riverview (New Brunswick), 1980
17 Kearny Cottage Historical Association (Perth Amboy), 1978-1979
18 Kellers–Ryders Lane (Milltown, etc.) & Morris Ave. (Spring-
field Township)–Surveys, 1979-1983
19 Kita, Henry (Plainfield), 1978
20 Lagos, Dr. John M. (Chatham Township), 1977
21 Lebanon Township–School Houses, 1979
22* Merchants & Drovers Inn–Rahway Historical Society, 1969-1980
23 Metuchen Meeting, 1978-1979
24* Mills, Timothy House (Morristown), 1977-1978
25 Middletown–Bowne House (Leonardo, Middletown Township), 1980
26 Millington House–George St. (New Brunswick), 1978
27 Monday Afternoon Club (Plainfield), 1980
28 Montclair Survey–J. Kellers, 1980
29* Morristown, 1980
30-31 National Trust Talk, 1980
32 Nevius Homestead (Bedminster), 1975
33-34 New Brunswick Historic District–Hiram Market Area, 1980
35 "New Brunswick Tomorrow", 1980
36 New Providence Historical Society, 1974
37* North Avenue (Plainfield), 1980
38 North Plainfield Historical Society, 1974
[map case only] Oakey House
39 Octagon House (Port Monmouth, Middletown Township), 1979
40-41 Old Bridge Township, 1980-1981
42 Olde Towne, Vandeveer-Knox House–Hoes Lane, 1974-1978
43-48* Olde Towne [East Jersey Olde Towne], 1973-1981

*For related oversize material, see boxes 6 and 7

BOX FOLDER CONTENTS

3 INDIVIDUAL BUILDING PROJECTS AND DISTRICT SURVEYS [continued]
1-3* Olde Towne [East Jersey Olde Town], 1973-1981 [continued]
4 Our Lady of Fatima–Phyphe House (Piscataway Township), 1977
5* Paterson College (Wayne), 1978
6-9* Perth Amboy, 1978-1979
10 Plainfield Historic Preservation, 1980
11 Plainfield–S & T Restaurant, 1980
12-13* Plainfield Downtown Development, 1978-1979
14 Plainfield Historic Review Committee, 1980
15-16* Poricy Park Citizens Committee (Middletown), 1975-1979
17 Preservation Plainfield, 1979
18 Rahway Library, 1978
19 Robinson House (Clark), 1979
20 Runyon Funeral Home (Plainfield), 1978
21 Saddle River Survey, 1980
22 Scotch Hills (Scotch Plains Township), 1979
23 Scotch Plains, 1975
24-27* Shoal Harbor–Spy House (Port Monmouth, Middletown Township),
1977-1983
28 Slocum House (Fanwood), 1979-1980
29 South Bound Brook Municipal Building, 1978
30* Spann, Max (Washington Township), 1978
31 Straus House (Atlantic Highlands), 1980-1981
32 Terrell, Mrs. Virginia (Plainfield), 1973
33 Thomson, George S. (Somerville), 1978
34-35 Unitarian Fellowship–Thorne Mansion (Morris Township), 1980
36-37* Van Bunschooten House (Wantage Township), 1974-1980

*For related oversize material, see boxes 6 and 7

BOX FOLDER CONTENTS

4 INDIVIDUAL BUILDING PROJECTS AND DISTRICT SURVEYS [continued]
1* Van Bunschooten House (Wantage Township), 1974-1980 [continued]
2-4* Van Duyne House (Wayne), 1976-1979
5 Walker, Allen–Janis House (Mahwah Township), 1978
6 Williamson, John House (Edison Township), 1978-1980
7 Zimmerman, Todd (Cherryville, Franklin Township, Hunterdon
County), 1980
(4) HIGHWAY EXTENSION PROPOSALS AND DISTRICT SURVEYS
[see also box 5 and map folders]
8-9 Route 55 Environmental Impact Study (Gloucester County), 1978
10-15 Route 78 Environmental Impact Study, 1975-1976
16 Sussex Turnpike (Morris County), 1981
17-20 Old Bridge Historic District, 1977-1978
21-22 Franklin Borough (Sussex County)–Sewage Facility Expansion
–Environmental Impact Study, 1979
23 Highland Falls/Fort Montgomery Proposed Sewage Facilities, 1980
24-25 Ogdensburg Sewage Facility Expansion–Environmental Impact
Study, 1979
26 Franklin & Ogdensburg Environment Impact Studies–Miscellaneous
27 Upper Walkill Basin–Realigned Sewage Facilities–Cultural
Resource Survey, 1979
28 Fourth Annual Conference on Preservation and Restoration of
Old Houses,Princeton, 1980

*For related oversize material, see boxes 6 and 7

BOX FOLDER CONTENTS

5 HIGHWAY EXTENSION PROPOSALS AND DISTRICT SURVEYS
[see also box 4 and map folders]
1 I-287 Alternate 1 Environment Studies, Montville & Pequannock,
1980
2 I-287 Correspondence–Final Report–Field Survey Notes, 1977
3 I-287 Correspondence (to Weck) Historic Architectural Analysis
(Suffern) [and Finances], 1980
4 I-287 Correspondence and Weck Instructions, 1977
5 I-287 Cultural Resource Survey–Architectural Analysis,
1981-1982
6 I-287 Field Notes and Rough Drafts
7 I-287 Final Report
8 I-287 Final Retyped Reports
9 I-287 Financial Information, 1977-1981
10 I-287 Ford Mansion (Morristown), 1975
11 I-287 Historic Archaeology Survey (Montville-NY State Thruway)
[and Notes], 1977-1979
12-14 I-287 Miscellaneous
15 I-287 Montville-Riverdale–Architectural Survey, 1980
16 I-287 Montville-Riverdale–Environmental Impact Study
17 I-287 Montville-Suffern Historic Archaeology Survey, 1977-1978
18-19 I-287 Montville-Suffern Historic Architecture Analysis
20 I-287 Montville-Suffern Historic Architecture Supplement, 1980
21 I-287 New York State Section, 1971-1980
22 I-287 Originals and Changes to Report, 1981-1983
23 I-287 Suffern Area–Research Material
24 I-287 Survey Reports and Field Notes
25-26 I-287 Wayne Township, 1978-1982
27 I-287 Working Maps & Notes

BOX FOLDER CONTENTS

6 (oversize) INDIVIDUAL BUILDING PROJECTS AND DISTRICT SURVEYS
[see also boxes 1-4 and 7]
1 Acorn Hall (Morristown), 1979
2 Burrowns Mansion (Matawan), 1975
3 Carriage House–Clinton Curtis (Morristown), 1979
4 Clinton Historical–Grandin Library (Clinton), 1978
5 Clinton Museum–Bids and Other Data, 1978
6 Clinton Museum–Old File, 1964-1965
7 Clinton Museum, 1965-1978
8 Clinton Museum, 1978
9 Crescent Avenue Historic District (Plainfield), 1927
10 Eld, Wendell (Lamington, Bedminster Township), 1952
11 Facade Program, 304-308 Front St. (Plainfield), 1952 and 1979
12 Facade Program, 435 Park Avenue (Plainfield), 1979
13 Friends Meeting House (Plainfield), 1954-1962
14 Gutherz Research Property (Oldwick, Tewksbury Township), 1979
15 Highland Falls (Highland Falls, New York), 1979-1980
16 Merchants & Drovers Inn–Rahway Historical Society, 1953-1972
17 Mills, Timothy House (Morristown), 1977-1978
18 Morristown, 1980
19 North Avenue (Plainfield), 1974
20-24 Olde Towne [East Jersey Olde Towne], 1973-1981
25 Our Lady of Fatima–Phyphe House (Piscataway Township), 1977

BOX FOLDER CONTENTS

7 (oversize) INDIVIDUAL BUILDING PROJECTS AND DISTRICT SURVEYS
[see also boxes 1-4 and 6]
1 Paterson College (Wayne), 1978
2 Perth Amboy, 1978-1979
3 Plainfield Downtown Development, 1978-1979
4 Poricy Park Citizens Committee (Middletown), 1975-1979
5 Shoal Harbor–Spy House (Port Monmouth, Middletown Township),
1978-1983
6 Spann, Max (Washington Township), 1980
7 Van Bunschooten House (Wantage Township), 1973-1975
8 Van Duyne House (Wayne), 1976-1979

BOX FOLDER CONTENTS

Map HIGHWAY EXTENSION PROPOSALS AND DISTRICT SURVEYS
Case [see also boxes 4-5]
1-7 Route 287 (Paterson-Hamburg Turnpike)
8 Route 55
9 Site Surveys and Building Restorations
Oakey House, 1976
Clinton Museum–Red Mill, 1978
Olde Towne [East Jersey Olde Towne] (East Brunswick map)
Badgley House–"Westfield in Revolutionary Times" (map)
Old Bridge Township, undated

Plainfield Library
The History of the Charles Detwiller Blueprint Collection
This unique collection originated with the enactment of an 1896 Plainfield municipal ordinance requiring the safekeeping of architectural drawings filed in application for building permits.

The City changed its retention requirements in 1970, and the original drawings were moved to the Wardlaw School for storage. After the duCret School of Art took ownership of the building, the drawings had to be moved again. Local architect Charles H. Detwiller Jr. stored them for several years, until 1982, when he was able to arrange for their transfer to the Plainfield Public Library.

This incredible architectural resource continues to grow through periodic transfers made by the City's Division of Inspections and through donations of drawings privately held by homeowners.

There are now 15,000 sets of drawings in the Detwiller collection, documenting over 100 years of residential and commercial architecture in the Plainfield area.

Despite the depth of the collection, not every property is included. In some cases drawings exist only for add-ons like garage or attic remodels, but not for the original structure. One reason for these gaps is that at the time the drawings were released from the City's jurisdiction, property owners were allowed to take the drawings of their own buildings.

Although the majority of drawings are of Plainfield buildings and date from 1896, there are exceptions. Some earlier drawings, donated by homeowners, are of structures that predate the building permits. Also, Detwiller's personal drawings represent clients from a variety of Plainfield-area communities.

Approximately 500 architects are represented in the collection. Drawings by early 20th century African-American architect Edward R. Williams and by British architect Element W. Fairweather are in the collection. Architects Charles Smith and George Ernest Robinson are both represented by local buildings that are on the National Register of Historic Places.

These drawings reflect changing architectural styles through the years. Plainfield's eight historic districts reveal virtually every important style of American residential architecture, ranging from Victorian to English Cottage to Sears Catalog. The availability of these drawings has played an important role in the rebirth of the residential neighborhoods.

The collection includes drawings of important community structures, such as Muhlenberg Regional Medical Center and Crescent Avenue Presbyterian Church, both of which have recently undergone renovations. Several buildings on the National Register, such as the Plainfield Fire Headquarters and the Plainfield Railroad Depot are also included.

To save the Detwiller collection for future generations while eliminating the problems of theft and damage, the blueprints and drawings have been microfilmed. To provide faster and easier public access to the collection, they have also been digitized. Homeowners and researchers now have images and data at their fingertips through their home computers.

The Frazee House

History of the Property

Gershom and Elizabeth Frazee (circa 1760-1817)
(Period of Interpretation)


The Frazee House in Scotch Plains at Two Bridges, near the intersection of Raritan and Terrill Roads west of Ash Swamp, is an Anglo-Dutch style colonial home. It was very likely built by the 18th century carpenter and joiner, Gershom Frazee who bought14 acres of land on Raritan Road in 1760 adjacent to John DeCamp from one Jeremiah Pangborn. In 1761, Frazee bought another adjoining property at Ash Swamp from one Jacob Winans, also a carpenter, in the 1750s. Winans or Winants was a Dutch family from the Staten Island vicinity. Frazee also built a house frame with James S. Coberly in 1758 for Cabinetmaker Samuel Prince on William Street in NY near where the Scotch Plains Baptist Society was then founding the NY Baptist Church. Frazee also bought wood from Douw of Albany at one point. Frazee was influenced by the earlier Dutch homes of the region with their low profile and cantilevered pent roof that extends in front of the kitchen. The heavy, widely-spaced beaded joists with plank floors are also characteristic of Dutch versus English "summer beam" and light joist construction techniques.

A Dutch-influenced Kas cupboard probably made by him and an eighteenth-century joiner's bench, also probably Frazee's, were found in an early lumber shed, next to the corn crib of his brother Moses Frazee's home, later Thomas Lee's, now the site of the Union County Technical Institute. This shed and the corn crib were subsequently moved to Black Birch Road by Architect Charles H. Detwiller for Marge and Bill Elliott.

www.frazeehouse.org

From the Corresponding Secretary file

Correspondence with Elisabeth Loizeaux

Thank you for the info on Marge Elliott. Come spring, we are planning to drive around and see what is left of some of these notable homes and gardens. Lois Poinier is still alive and "sharp as a tack" according to Cathy McGraw of the Short Hills Garden Club. She is living in Mystic, CT. Hopefully she will be able to provide some of the descriptions we need on her gardens. The plots thickens as they say!


On Tue, Jan 25, 2011 at 2:47 PM, Elisabeth Loizeaux <ekloizeaux@comcast.net> wrote:

Very interesting about Lois Poinier (I misspelled her name in previous mail) She, by the way, also did our own landscaping many years back. Yes, of course I would be able to identify other pictures of Driftway Farm, after all, my husband Peter was born there and we were next door neighbors all our married life in NJ.

I do not know the Sanders property at all, but am very familiar with Marge Elliot's (Mrs. William) on Black Birch Road in Scotch Plains. When Charles Detweiler moved her historic house from behind what is now Union County Tech. to its present location, we bought old beams belonging to a barn of that house and had them installed in our house, which was also designed by Charles Detweiler. We were quite involved with the Elliot project –– I wonder how much of her unique :farm" garden is still intact. Lois Poinier and Marge did a fantastic landscaping job, I am glad there are pictures. We had many GC meetings at Mrs. Elliot's house. Barbara Sandford will know all the details, she was a close friend of Marge's. I can't remember the number on Black Birch Road, but it is the only historic house in the development, in fact it has a marker, it's on the left hand side as you drive up Black Birch.

As far as "old Plainfield" family relationships and connections are concerned, Sally Booth, having grown up in Plainfield, would probably also be knowledgeable. Other than that Barbara Peek and Jane Burner also grew up in Plainfield. Consider me the expert on Loizeaux and Fosters.......

Elisabeth

from the Corresponding Secretary file

not dated, presumed to be 1991

Elizabeth –

These are the people who contributed to the PGC in memory of Betty Fitzpatrick.

One list is for your reference – I guess letters need to be written.

One list is for the Fitzpatrick family – Send it to the Sleepy Hollow address and I'm sure they will get it. Anne

from the Corresponding Secretary file

'Giggleswick' by Marjorie Blackman Elliott 1989

PGC Member Marjorie Blackman Elliott traces the history of the Mellick family and in particular PGC founding member Mrs. George P. (Ella Hartley) Mellick '15 and her well known estate, 'Giggleswick'

Mrs. Elliott writes of Mr. Detwiller's involvement with the Mellick property, Giggleswick, and how his parents were friends of the Mellicks and as a boy, he swam in their pools which were part of an elaborate garden design.

Plainfield Public Library Collection

http://www.plainfieldlibrary.info/Departments/LH/LH_detwiller.html

This unique collection originated with the enactment of an 1896 Plainfield municipal ordinance requiring the safekeeping of architectural drawings filed in application for building permits. The first building permit in Plainfield was issued on January 27, 1896 to George W. Moore. By 1969, 40,800 permits had been issued.

The City changed its retention requirements in 1970, and the original drawings were moved to the Wardlaw School for storage. After the duCret School of Art took ownership of the building, the drawings had to be moved again. Local architect Charles H. Detwiller Jr. stored them for several years, until 1982, when he was able to arrange for their transfer to the Plainfield Public Library.

This incredible architectural resource continues to grow through periodic transfers made by the City's Division of Inspections and through donations of drawings privately held by homeowners.

There are now 15,000 sets of drawings in the Detwiller collection, documenting over 100 years of residential and commercial architecture in the Plainfield area.

Despite the depth of the collection, not every property is included. In some cases drawings exist only for add-ons like garage or attic remodels, but not for the original structure. One reason for these gaps is that at the time the drawings were released from the City's jurisdiction, property owners were allowed to take the drawings of their own buildings.

Although the majority of drawings are of Plainfield buildings and date from 1896, there are exceptions. Some earlier drawings, donated by homeowners, are of structures that predate the building permits. Also, Detwiller's personal drawings represent clients from a variety of Plainfield-area communities.

Approximately 500 architects are represented in the collection. Drawings by early 20th century African-American architect Edward R. Williams and by British architect Element W. Fairweather are in the collection. Architects Charles Smith and George Ernest Robinson are both represented by local buildings that are on the National Register of Historic Places (external link).

These drawings reflect changing architectural styles through the years. Plainfield's eight historic districts reveal virtually every important style of American residential architecture, ranging from Victorian to English Cottage to Sears Catalog. The availability of these drawings has played an important role in the rebirth of the residential neighborhoods.

The collection includes drawings of important community structures, such as Muhlenberg Regional Medical Center and Crescent Avenue Presbyterian Church, both of which have recently undergone renovations. Several buildings on the National Register, such as the Plainfield Fire Headquarters and the Plainfield Railroad Depot are also included.

To save the Detwiller collection for future generations while eliminating the problems of theft and damage, the blueprints and drawings have been microfilmed. To provide faster and easier public access to the collection, they have also been digitized. Homeowners and researchers now have images and data at their fingertips through their home computers.

1984 Questover Designer Showhouse Program

Questover Program pages 1 through 55

Questover Program pages 56 through 106

Questover Program pages 107 through 131

1974 Junior League Designer Showcase: The Martine House

1974 Designer Showcase Martine House Cover to Page 25

1974 Designer Showcase Martine House Page 26 to End

In addition to saving the 1988 Program for the Designers Showhouse of Cedar Brook Farm (aka The Martine House) which was organized by the Muhlenberg Auxiliary, PGC Member Anne Shepherd also kept the 1974 Designers Showcase of the very same home, organized by the Junior League.

Within the program pages, you will find mentioned many PGC members. They include: Clawson, MacLeod, Kroll, Davis, Wyckoff, Stevens, Loizeaux, Swain, Hunziker, Connell, Foster, Dunbar, Elliott, Fitzpatrick, Gaston, Hackman, Holman, Lockwood, Morrison, Royes, Rushmore, Sanders, Williams, Barnhart, Bellows, Burger, Burner, Carter, Clendenin, DeHart, Detwiller, Eaton, Eckert, Fort, Frost, Gonder, Keating, Laidlaw, Loosli, Madsen, Mann, Marshall, Miller, Moody, Moon, Morse, Murray, Mygatt, Barrett, Peek, Perkins, Pfefferkorn, Pomeroy, Pond, Royes, Samek, Sandford, Sheble, Stevens, Shepherd, Stewart, Stout, Trewin, Vivian, Zeller, Cochran, Mooney and Hall.

1982 May Designer Showhouse: 1127 Watchung Avenue

Cover to Page 25

Page 26 to Page 51

Page 52 to Page 75

Page 76 to Back Cover

April 25, 2012 Mrs. Detwiller Resigns

Lorriane received a letter this week advising the Club that Mrs. Detwiller can no longer read the information we send her monthly and has resigned from the club. Cath Detwiller had just recently sent us her momentos from her days in the club, which we returned. She has been a member of the Plainfield GC for 55 years.

Detwiller, Cath (Mrs. Charles H.) '57
Fox Hill Village #220
10 Longwood Drive
Westwood, MA 02090
(617) 329-4072

Note:

Mrs. Detwiller is unable to read the notes from the Garden Club so she will not be renewing her membership this year. She has enjoyed the Garden Club for many years and will miss it.

Thank you.

Princeton Alumni Weekly

Charles Henry Detwiller Jr. '39
Published in Sept. 11, 1991, issue
DET DIED of a heart attack at his Cape Cod home on May 11, 1991. He had been living there in retirement since 1985, when he closed the Plainfield architectural firm he had founded in 1947. His practice covered a wide range, designing residences, commercial and public buildings, but he specialized in restoring and preserving antique buildings. He served on the American Institute of Architects National Committee for Historical Preservation. Among his favorite accomplishments were the creation and development of Stage House Village in Scotch Plains, N.J. and the Seamen's Inn in Mystic, Conn. In Massachusetts, he was a trustee of the Cape Museum of Fine Arts.

In a lighter vein, Det had a deft touch in creating cartoons, a talent we first enjoyed in his undergraduate contributions to the TIGER and the PRINCE. Ever since, he has responded generously whenever the Class asked for artwork to enliven our Class yearbooks and letters.

Det and Catherine Campbell were married in 1941. To Cathy, their daughters, Deborah Smith and Laurie Sorensen, and sons, Charles III and Frederic '68, we offer our sincere sympathy and our continuing friendship.

The Class of 1939

April 27, 2012 Letter from Marty Dyke, Corresponding Secretary

Dear Mrs. Detwiller,

We were sorry to receive notification that you will not be renewing your membership in the Plainfield Garden Club however we do understand. You've been a member in the Club for 55 years and many members of your family have also served. During that time you received both individual and group awards for your efforts. These efforts through the Club have contributed greatly to the City of Plainfield, which I'm sure they greatly appreciate. Thank you for being part of the rich heritage that makes up the Plainfield Garden Club.

Marty

May 12, 2012 GCA Zone IV Meeting and Flower Show

PGC Members Jeanne Turner, Patti Dunstan and Phyllis Alexander researched over 275 members chronicled on our website, www.plainfieldgardenclub.org, and chose the following ladies as "themes" for the luncheon tables:

Eight Notable Women of the PGC

June 12, 2012 Email from Mrs. Detwiller's family

New "Contact Us" submission from Frederic C. Detwiller
From: donotreply@andyswebtools.com
Date: Tue, June 12, 2012 11:53 am
To: info@plainfieldgardenclub.org (more)
Priority: Normal
Options: View Full Header | View Printable Version | Download this as a file | View Message details

You've received a new submission from your "contact us" through your "Plainfield
Garden Club" Andy's Web Tools web site.

name: Frederic C. Detwiller
email: rick.detwiller@comcast.net
phone: 978 352-2819

message:

We have a portrait of Cath Detwiller by Gerry Acomb. I could send you a peg of this for your website since it relates to two of your members. Our mother is still living at Fox Hill Village in Westwood, MA and recently celebrated her 96th birthday with her new great grandson Benjamin Xavier Detwiller.

June 13, 2012 Email from Rick Detwiller

Subject: Re: Plainfield Garden Club New "Contact Us" submission from Frederic C. Detwiller
From: "Frederic C.Detwiller" <rick.detwiller@comcast.net>
Date: Tue, June 12, 2012 3:51 pm
To: "Info" <info@plainfieldgardenclub.org>
Cc: "Debbie D. Smith" <debbiedet@roadrunner.com> (more)


Dear Susan,

Thank you very much for getting back to me so soon with the information on the website. I have seen my mother Cath Detwiller's page but lately it was the only one I had needed the password, etc. to view. I have seen Aunt Dot Davis's and my grandmother Mabel Campbell's along with all the great photos of Hillcrest in Watchung as well as my Great Aunt Laura Detwiller's page. I also enjoyed browsing through lots of old friends pages. It is a great trip down Plainfield and Scotch Plains' memory lane. You have done a great job putting all these items together and posting them on-line!

Attached are several jpegs of members I happen to have on hand:

1) Cath Detwiller' and her portrait by Gerry Acomb.
2) Aunt Laura Cecelia Detwiller's self portrait ca. 1885 as she appeared when she lit the fireworks display for the opening of the Brooklyn Bridge in 1883. (I also have a photo of her in her garden on Hillside Ave. in Plainfield when she was a garden club member and will send a jpeg along when I dig it out).
3) Detail photo of Cath (Detwiller) and Dorothy Campbell (Davis) in the
garden at Hillcrest.
4) Several photos of members of the Plainfield Garden Club at Cath
Detwiller's ca.1965 garden party at our Clarke's Lane Farm in Scotch Plains.

Regards,

Rick D.

Cath Detwiller & Portrait by Gerry Acomb Feb. 2007

1885 Laura C. Detwiller

1920s ca. Cath & Dot Campbell Hillcrest

Cath Detwiller Plainfield Garden Club Party ca. 1965

sent in by Rick Detwiller, June 13, 2012

Dear Susan -

I thought you would enjoy those photos and I'm glad they will be fun for the older members to see. I know that Betty Horn, Valentine Fort, Toni Mann, Peggy Brower Newberry-Burger, Betty Fitzpatrick, June Barlow and Dot Davis are among the group and it's good to know you recognized Mrs. Seybolt. I'm sure Mrs. Sandford will be glad to see so many friends with herself among them!

Laura Detwiller was Dad's Aunt - she was his father's sister. Attached are a few more of her watercolors she did when she lived in Greenville, NJ that you may want to add to her page. We have lots of them, but most are now in the collection of the Bronx Botanical Garden. Also attached is a picture of Dad, Charles H. Detwiller, Jr. with his mother Ethel Hassel Detwiller in what I believe is Aunt Laura Detwiller's garden at 971 Hillside Ave. in Plainfield when she would have been a Garden Club member. Aunt Laura or Charles Sr. must have taken the photo since I have another one of her in the garden, probably taken at the same time. I'll send that second photo along with more garden club related material as I find it.

Thanks,

Rick D.

Cath Detwiller Plainfield Garden Club Party ca. 1965

Cath Detwiller Plainfield Garden Club Party ca. 1965

June 13, 2012
Sally Kroll wrote in to say that these four women are Cath Detwiller, Betty Fitzpatrick, Anne Marie Seybold and Barbara Sandford

Mabel R. Campbell Portrait ca. 1915

June 13, 2012 Email from Rick Detwiller

'Glad people are enjoying these as much as we are. Attached is the jpeg of Laura C. Detwiller. For some reason it was still in PhotoShop so that explains the download problem. It should be fine this time.

I thought you'd also like to see our Swiss cousin Alfred Seiler's cartoon of the 1928 Plainfield Horse Show It shows Freddie, Dad's sister Marguerite Detwiller (Harwood) , and I think one of the Wigton girls who fell off the horse and landed in the mud puddle. Also attached is a photo ca.May-June 1954 of Krolls, Detwillers, Campbells, Wigtons and Stuarts et al watching a neighborhood horseshow. Not necessarily Garden Club, but classics!
(l. To r. Gordon Stuart, Nancy Dwinnell Kroll, Laurie Detwiller, Bill
Wigton, Steve Kroll, Rick Detwiller, Cindy Kroll, and Bill Campbell. Cath
Detwiller and Jean Stuart standing behind fence)

Cheers!

Rick D.

May - June 1954 Detwiller Kroll Plainfield Horse Show

June 26, 2012 PGC Visits the Laura Detwiller's paintings at the NYBG

link

1873 Detwiller Children Portrait Before & After

Subject: Re: Laura Cecelia Detwiller
From: "Frederic C.Detwiller" <rick.detwiller@comcast.net>
Date: Mon, July 2, 2012 12:28 pm
To: "Info" <info@plainfieldgardenclub.org>

Hi Susan -

Glad people like the photos/graphics. Attached is the last antique
"PhotoShop" one done around 1873. Laurie has the original portrait, and I found the old photo among the archives here. I'll send along the Pope's flower box sample and some other specimen copies when I dig them out.

Thanks,

Rick D.

Frederick K. Detwiller

http://keithsheridan.com/detwiller.html

F r e d e r i c k= K. =D e t w i l l e r- - – 1 8 8 2 - 1 9 5 2

The Sixth Avenue Spur, New York City = 1924-27, Lithograph.

Edition not stated. Signed, titled, dated 1924 and inscribed To my Friend Herbert L. Jones in pencil. Signed and dated, in the stone, lower right; initialed and dated 1927 in the stone, lower left.

Image size 20 1/2 x 14 inches (521 x 356 mm); sheet size 25 1/4 x 19 inches (641 x 483 mm).

A fine, rich impression, on cream wove paper, with full margins (1 3/4 to 3 inches), in excellent condition.

SOLD

1958 Check Book

No. 1308
May 26, 1958
C. Detwiller
N. Y. Flower Show exhibit
$10.00

1958 Check Book

No. 1340
Dec. 29, 1958
Catherine Detwiller
$11.65

Residence (side and rear view) of Charles H. Detwiller, 151 East Seventh Street

In this illustrated book, the Courier-News has sought to present some of the representative homes of The Plainfields and adjoining territory, together with such other buildings of interest and importance as would serve to convey an idea of the physical attractioins of one of the most beautiful and healthful cities in the Metropolitan District. The homes reflect the desirability of this community as a place of residence.

The churches, schools, clubs and public buildings pictured serve to give the stranger some conceptions of the beauty of the city and its right to be termed the "Queen City" of New Jersey.

With picturesque Watchung Hills as a background, this section with all its natural advantages, plus a progressive spirit, coupled with high class local governing bodies and a live Chamber of Commerce, is pecularily adapted for home sites and, as a result, it has enjoyed a steady and healthy growth for many years.


publication circa 1917

October 3, 2012 Letter to Cath Detwiller from Corresponding Secretary Phyllis Alexander

Dear Cath,

I'm writing to let you know that the Plainfield Garden Club is not letting you resign quietly! The Garden Club board has unanimously voted to make you an honorary member. As a member of our Plainfield Garden Club for 55 years you have made many contributions to our history and achieved work of distinction.

Your skill in flower arranging, recognized with the award of second prize in The Novice Class at the International Flower Show in 1958, was certainly a notable achievement. In addition, you won many blue ribbons in our club flower shows.

As an honorary member, your dues will be paid by the club and will also include membership in the Garden Club of America.

We send you our best wishes and hope you are enjoying a beautiful autumn season.

Warmest regards,

Phyllis Alexander
Corresponding Secretary
October 3, 2012

PS. Thought you might like to know I livew in the former Fitzpatrick house on Sleepy Hollow Lane where your husband designed a beautiful addition some years ago. P. A.

October 10, 2012 Letter from Cath Detwiller to Corresponding Secretary Phyllis Alexander

October 10, 2012 Letter from Cath Detwiller to Corresponding Secretary Phyllis Alexander

Dear Phyllis,

It was a great surprise to receive your letter telling me I was to be an honorary member of the Plainfield Garden Club.

I enjoyed so much my many years of meetings, lectures $ raising fairs, flower arranging (with expert advice and assistance from other members) the Shakespeare Garden, and all I learned during those years.

I will be delighted to receive the G.C.A. Bulletins again, and the reports from the P.G.C.

I thank you and the Board members for this very special honor.

Sincerely,

Cath Detwiller
Oct. 10, 2012

October 10, 2012 Letter from Cath Detwiller to Corresponding Secretary Phyllis Alexander

March 13, 2013 Maria's Blog

Crescent-Times Blog Spot

Wednesday, March 13, 2013
Plainfield History Digs: Charles H. Detwiller Jr.
It is no secret that Plainfield history is fascinating to many residents and non-residents and why wouldn't it be? After all, Plainfield offers what many towns lack: a diverse community that live, more or less, in peace under a rich architectural and social past.

One figure of Plainfield's past, not that long ago, is Charles H. Detwiller Jr. The name is familiar to those who have visited the Plainfield Public Library's History Room, either in person or on line, to get access to blue prints of Plainfield homes.

But my knowledge of Mr. Detwiller just went as far as his blue prints. Little did I know that there were not one Charles Detwiller but two, Sr. and Jr. Charles H. Detwiller Junior is the one that has captured my attention since yesterday when I received a copy of the Crescent Area Historic District original inventory manuscript that was used to nominate the neighborhood to the National Register of Historic Places. It was Charles H. Detwiller Jr. who catalogued and described each of the 124 properties that were nominated to become part of the Crescent Area Historic District. The year was 1979.

A search for who was Detwiller Jr. took me to Rutgers. The Rutgers University Library describes him as follows:

"Charles H. Detwiller, Jr., restoration architect, chair of the New Jersey chapter of the American Institute of Architects' committee on historic preservation and an officer of the New Jersey Chapter of Architectural Historians, was graduated from Princeton University in 1939. He received further education at the Brooklyn School of Design and Construction, from which he was graduated in 1950. The son of Charles Detwiller, Sr., an architect in Plainfield, New Jersey, Charles Jr. had his office in Plainfield as well. His father, having once walked him around the former family homestead near Allentown, Pennsylvania, to "point out a pretty cornice," succeeded in sparking a passion in him at age 11 for architecture specifically dealing with older buildings.

His first recorded historical restoration project was the Drake House (circa 1747), Plainfield, the interiors of which Detwiller worked on in 1950. The next major project, in 1961, was the Stage House Inn (circa 1837), Scotch Plains, which involved not only restoration but house moving. Other important projects were the Mystic Maritime Museum (circa 1810), Mystic, Connecticut, which entailed new construction in period style, the Badgley House (circa 1710-40), Mountainside, which he measured and prepared a proposal to reconstruct, and the Old Red Mill Museum and Historic Village in Clinton, new construction in period style.

Detwiller also did consulting work with ten different historical societies throughout New Jersey and, in conjunction with a variety of engineering firms, advised on the cultural impact of major highway extensions in northern and central New Jersey (I-287, I-78 and Route 55)."

There is more to this story, but I am lacking the time to continue. If you want to read more about Charles H. Detwiller and his work here in Plainfield please visit the following link:

http://www.libraries.rutgers.edu/rul/libs/scua/detwiller/detwiller.shtml


3 comments:
Plainfield Garden Club said...
Thank for the great article on Mr. Detwiller. We will be sure to forward it to the family. Your readers may be interested to know that the Campbell-Detwiller family contributed greatly to Plainfield and they can read about the individuals at www.plainfieldgardenclub.org

In particular, Mr. Detwiller's wife, Catherine, who is an Honorary Member of the club, at this direct link:

http://andyswebtools.com/cgi-bin/p/awtp-pa.cgi?d=plainfield-garden-club&type=4626

Mr. Detwiller's aunt, Miss Laura Cecelia Detwiller:

http://andyswebtools.com/cgi-bin/p/awtp-pa.cgi?d=plainfield-garden-club&type=4568

Mr. Detwiller's mother-in-law, Mrs. William Hall (Mabel C. Raper) Campbell:

http://andyswebtools.com/cgi-bin/p/awtp-pa.cgi?d=plainfield-garden-club&type=4607

and Mr. Detwiller's sister-in-law, Mrs. F. Edgar (Dorothy Campbell) Davis:

http://andyswebtools.com/cgi-bin/p/awtp-pa.cgi?d=plainfield-garden-club&type=4608

In addition, we have listed the homes of our members at this link:

http://andyswebtools.com/cgi-bin/p/awtp-pa.cgi?d=plainfield-garden-club&type=6386

Readers should see if they happen to live in one of "the club's" Homes & Gardens.
9:31 AM
Pat Turner Kavanaugh said...
Maria: Charlie Detwiller helped du Cret get its state and national historic listing; he designed buildings for both Hartridge and Wardlaw; many oter contributions to Plainfield. His son Ric has followed in his father's footsepts, and is helping Scotch Plains restore an historic house there. He consulted wit us on Virginia Terrell's house. His daughter Debbie is instrumental in saving an historic merry-go-round in Massachusetts. All round good family.
11:02 AM
Michael Townley said...
Another of Charles Jr.'s projects was the restoration of the Dr. William Robinson Museum and Plantation in Clark. I had the pleasure of working with him and for them in restoring the leaded glass windows in the building. My recollection is that I did that work in the late 1970's.
1:30 PM

Crescent Avenue Historic District

Crescent Area Historic District

Post Office: Plainfiled
Zip: 07060

WHAT'S NEAR
Hillside Avenue Historic District
Van Wyck Brooks Historic District

The Crescent Area Historic District was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1980. Portions of the text below were adapted from a copy of the original nomination document. [†] Adaptation copyright © 2013, The Gombach Group.

Prior to the arrival of the white man, the Lenni-Lenape Indians, part of the Algonquin Tribe, lived in this area of New Jersey. The Ice Age had endowed this area with a protective terrain, productive farmlands and forests and "wonderful pure air and springs." Indian trails became the highways and streets still in use in Plainfield today.Watchung Avenue located in the heart of the Crescent Area Historic District was once one of those trails. Remains of an Indian village and burial grounds have been found in the locality of First, Second and Third Place which are within the boundaries of the Crescent Avenue Historic District.

The first white settlers from Scotland and Holland arrived in the area in the 1680's. The first permanent settler was Thomas Gordon whose home was on Cedarbrook Road adjacent to Crescent Avenue, and whose land holdings covered most of what is present-day Plainfield. The enthusiastic letters back home detailing the healthful climate, plentiful game, fish and fowl, good soil and water brought other settlers to New Jersey, in spite of the "Flee by the salt marshes, most troublesome in the summer." These elements continued through the years to attract new residents.

During the Revolutionary War, patriots from area families served in militia regiments as foot soldiers and officers. An important battle, the Battle of the Short Hills, was fought in the area in June of 1777 and was instrumental in repelling the British in New Jersey. Some of the homes of those who supported the cause of the Revolution still exist today: The Drake House Museum, where Washington rested and briefed his officers, and the Vermule Homestead, where the officers were quartered.
Following the war, industry and transportation began to grow and take on added importance, contributing to the economic prosperity. Plainfield became officially recognized on April 1, 1800 with a population of 215. The Gordon Gazetteer in 1834 gave a glowing account of all the rich resources in Plainfield and noted that "the society is moral and religious."

It was in Plainfield in 1847 that the model for the public school system for the state was devised. Through the efforts of Dr. Charles H. Stillman, Plainfield physician, the New Jersey Legislature empowered the city to raise money by taxation in order to establish a public school system. An account of the day declares, "No one can measure the effect of this enlightened policy in extending the fame of the city and building up its prosperity." Many of the people who were active in education and cultural activities lived within the bounds of the Crescent Area Historic District.

The most influential force to the development of Plainfield was the railroad, which brought about a change in the social and economic character of the town. When a direct connection was made between Plainfield and New York City, c.1850, Plainfield became a commuter town.

During the Civil War, many local residents were involved in the fighting. General Sterling, a general on McCleland's staff, built his home and settled on First Place after the War.

Job Male, a philanthropist, who became known as "Plainfield's Grand Old Man", settled in Plainfield in 1867, following the Civil War. An inventor, he had simplified the loading of ferry slips with a patented leveling device. He purchased with Evan Jones, twenty four acres of land "in the suburbs and laid it out in village lots and streets and erected twenty substantial residences of fine architectural design, drawing the plans for them all himself." He was his own contractor and owned a greater part of the land that includes Crescent Avenue and Watchung Avenue. He designed a particularly distinctive style of architecture "stucco-walled, Mansard roofed, still standing today." He continued to build homes in different parts of the city until his possessions included more than one hundred Plainfield houses. His obituary notice in 1891 noted that "his purse always ready to respond to the calls of deserving charity." He was a public benefactor, making possible the Public Library and the Job Male Art Gallery, and donating the land for the hospital, the Crescent Avenue Presbyterian Church, and the Unitarian Church.

A Central New Jersey Times account in 1870 of "Our Town Improvements" wrote, "The improvements in building is the expression of a spirit that leads to progressive movements in other directions. The old houses are not recognizable with tints of brown and cream and olive, their plain roofs metamorphosed by pediments, fancy gables and cornices, their primitive simplicity converted into modern beauty by wings, bay windows, recessed projections and every variety of architectural development." The writer further comments on the "new houses, with their aspiring towers, French roofs and cupolas." It was the kind of community that led the Elizabeth Herald in May of 1888 to write, "The bustling activity of the city of Plainfield...is remarkable." And to conclude, "The next move in Plainfield, no doubt, will be the horse cars."
Plainfield had become a fashionable summer resort and eventually attracted many wealthy New York businessmen to settle here year 'round. The Gas Light Age evokes memories of Plainfield with theatricals, minstrel shows, roller rinks and other forms of entertainment. The site of many hotels, the Netherwood was reputed to be one of the "most healthful, comfortable and accessible inland summer resorts in the country."

By 1890, with substantial wealth and improvements, Plainfield continued to advance and prosper, attracting people of substance to live here. As successful businessmen and their families settled in the Crescent Avenue area, they became active in the cultural, religious, and educational affairs of the city. James W. Jackson, William D. Murray both served as presidents of the newly-formed YMCA. Henry C. Squires established the Hope Chapel on January 1, 1888 as a branch of the Crescent Avenue Presbyterian Church. Augustus Baldwin worked closely with Job Male in establishing the first free public library and the art gallery. In 1883 some of the first subscribers to "the last word in modern efficiency," the telephone, lived in the District: George Goddard, F.O. Herring, Leander Lovell, and the Dumond family. Many served as members of the Common Council.

After Job Male's death, Plainfield continued to be a highly desirable neighborhood and remained that way until the 1930's, when many of the large homes were converted to apartments. This process continues with single family residences almost non-existent today. The alterations for the most part are tastefully done and are not detrimental to the basic style and charm of the original building. This makes for a particularly fine collection of buildings appropriate to an Historic District.
Notes on Recollections of Long-time Residents of the Area
Longtime residents of Plainfield have been interviewed regarding their recollections of famous residents of this area. Those persons interviewed were Mrs. Lawrence Heely, Mrs. Henry Noss, Mrs. Dorothy Wills, Mrs. Helen Mygatt, Mr. John Harmon, Miss Gwen Cochran, Mrs. Dorothy DeHart, Miss Dorothy Leal, Mr. Alfred Genung, Mr. Alex Kroll, Mr. A.L.C. Marsh, Mrs. Hendrick Van Oss and others.

Many people have lived there who were outstanding in cultural fields, education and politics, as well as very successful professional and business men, active both locally and in New York City. Also educators and statesmen lived here.

John Carlson, a renown artist and member of the National Academy lived on 3rd Place as did Alex Seidel who achieved international fame for his designs for Steuben Glass. Another prominent artist who lived here was Thomas Hart Benton whose brother lived for many years on Crescent Avenue. Also William Gilbert, a well known illustrator, lived on Crescent Avenue.

The author of the White Cliffs of Dover, Alice Duer Miller, A. Van Dorn Honeyman, the famous historian, lived on 9th Street, and also Van Wyk Brooks another well-known author. Ernest Ackerman, a representative in U.S. Congress in the 1870's and his brother Marion Ackerman, who lived on Crescent Avenue, founded the Lone Star Cement Company and were deeply involved in many large national important financial and industrial enterprises.

The famous opera singer, Mario Caruso, married a Goddard and was frequently a visitor to Plainfield to the Goddard House at 213 East 9th Street. This family had a profound influence on the musical advancement of the entire area.

The area abounded in lawyers, judges and politicians, including four Mayors of Plainfield, and people in the foreign service for 25 years, such as Hendrick Van Oss, most recently served as ambassador to Madagascar and other countries.

The Crescent Avenue area was truly the heart of the town and boasted the most important and influential people of the period 1860 through 1920. The homes of these people reflect their taste, affluence and are a tangible piece of architectural history reflecting a glorious past.

Summary
The Crescent Area Historic District is a great deal more than a lot of old houses. It is probably one of the finest collections of Victorian architecture in the country. The term Victorian is all inclusive and embraces numerous styles that echo tastes and decorative devices of other periods of architecture from other countries and other times than the one in which the present buildings were constructed. The majority of these have what in architectural terms is referred to as Italianate which stems from the architectural styles popular in Italy going back as far as Byzantine derivative styles, and 15th century Venetian palaces. These variety of design styles result in the sudden surge of interest in European cultures and an attempt by the suddenly successful and new class of wealthy businessmen who were anxious to reflect their success in the work of finance in their homes. These interests were stimulated by their travels abroad and what they had seen, which was considered elegant. Thus we have Tuscan towers, Italian villas, Palazzo's with loggia and arcaded window and arches, Renaissance, Egyptian motifs, classical elements, and finally the exuberant eclectic styles throwing the more American traits of Carpenter Gothic and Stick style in for good measure. English architecture is also reflected with half timber, projecting gables, Eastlake influence, Queen Anne and Edwardian styles. The detail photos of these buildings reflect the painstaking craftsmanship of the builders and imaginative design abilities of the architects. It is truly a tangible record of the past which should be preserved as close to its original state as practical, in their new role of many being converted for multi-family use.

The Crescent Area Historic District is one of the finest collections of suburban Victorian architecture in New Jersey. Developed as a speculative real estate venture in the 1870's by Job Male, the buildings are an impressive presentation of Italianate and Second Empire style architecture of the mid to late 19th century. The houses were primarily designed for wealthy businessmen and, consequently, visages within the district still retain a fine elegance in their total ambiance of buildings and their association with landscaping, rustic streets, sidewalks, and trees.

References
Blumenson, John J.G. Identifying American Architecture
Central New Jersey Times, 1870-1885.
Clayton, W. Woodford. History of Union & Middlesex Counties, 1882.
Cochran, Jean Carter. The History of Crescent Avenue Church
The Courier News, History of Plainfield, 1964.
The Courier News, November 1-4-8, 1954.
Devlin, Harry. To Grandfather's House We Go.
Downey, Andrew Jackson. The Architecture of Country Houses.
The Drake House Museum & The Plainfield Public Library, Scrapbooks and Files.
Dunham, F.A. Atlas City of Plainfield and Boro of North Plainfield, 1894.
Fitzgerald & Co. (Pub.). Springfield, Massachusetts, Plainfield City Directory, 1876-7.
Gowans, Alan. Images of American Living.
Honeyman, A. Van Dorn. History of Union County, Volumes I, II, & III.
Lapsley, Howard G. History of Plainfield, 1942.
League of Women Voters. This is Plainfield, 1954.
McCabe, Wayne. Historic Tour – Plainfield, N.J.
Plainfield Area Chamber of Commerce, Plainfield Area, N.J.
Pub. by Plainfield Courier News. Plainfield & Vicinity in Pictures, 1926.
Plainfield Daily Press, Friday & Saturday, January 30, 31, 1891.
Plainfield Evening News, Saturday, May 23, 1888.
Plainfield & North Plainfield City Directory, 1879-80.
Plainfield & North Plainfield City Directory, 1894-5.
Pratt, Dorothy & Richard, A Guide to Early American Homes.
Smiley, F.T. History of Plainfield, 1891.
† Charles H. Detwiller, Jr., A.I.A., Architect and Marilyn Rupp, Architectural Historian, Crescent Area Historic District, Union County, New Jersey, nomination document, 1979, National Park Service, National Register of Historic Places, Washington, D.C.

July 18, 2013 Drake House

The current exhibit at The Drake House Museum is titled "Forty Years on The National Register of Historic Places." The Nathaniel Drake House was registered on June 19, 1973, by Charles H. Detwiller, Jr., who was an architect and former president of the Historical Society of Plainfield.

Mr. Detwiller's wife, is of course PGC Member Cath Campbell Detwiller. Cath, in her 90's now, joined the PGC in 1957 and was recently bestowed the title "Honorary" member of The Club. To read about the Campbell-Detwiller contributions to not only The Club, but to all of Plainfield, click Cath's link and those below.

Detwiller, Miss Laura Cecelia '29
Campbell, Mrs. William Hall (Mabel C. Raper) '28
Davis, Mrs. F. Edgar (Dorothy Campbell) '60

Upcoming Fall Exhibit and Special Programs at Drake House

July 18, 2013 Email from Martie

As you may know....

Charlie Detwiller designed our house on Woodland Avenue (1976) and Elisabeth and Peter Loizeaux's house on Unami Lane in Scotch Plains. He was the force and architect behind the restoration of Stage Coach Village in Scotch Plains.

Martie Samek

1979 - 1980

Crescent Avenue Historic District form for the National Register of Historic Places prepared for submission by Charles Detwiller.

August 28, 2013 Plaintalker II

In another frustrating aspect .of Tuesday's meeting, Commission Secretary Scott Bauman said he received an "underwhelming" response to a letter seeking local support for a 501-C 3 foundation to look after the historic Lampkin House on Terrill Road. See Plaintalker's post here for background. Bauman said if there is no response, the effort might be taken over by an outside group, which he said could be "embarrassing." He said interest has been expressed by the Daughters of the Revolution and by an out-of-state member of the Detwiller family. Charles Detwiller Jr. was responsible for saving a collection of local architectural records which are now held at the Plainfield Public Library.

2013-10-27 Email Exchange

Dear Mrs. Faraone,

I stumbled upon your email exchange with the Plainfield Garden Club when I was searching for something else. To the best of my recollection, my family rented 717 Dixie Lane from about 1954 to 1958. I remember the Gastons. Mary Lightburn (the daughter of the Mary Lightburn you mention, I think) was one of my best friends. We were in the same class at Hartridge (1964). My mother, Victoria H. Furman, was an active member of the Plainfield Garden Club. She and my father, Gerald S. Furman, were friends with the Loizeaux and Detwillers. The Loizeaux daughter was also at Hartidge, Class of '64.

I notice there is no photo of my mother on the Notable Members list. I will try to remember to scan the photo I have of her at the Plant and Bake Sale at Drake House in 1962 and email it to you.

Sandy Furman

1954 - 1970 296 Images from Plainfield Library Scrapbook

May 21, 1959

1962

April 17, 1963

Left to right: Mrs. Hayward F. Day; Mr. Charles Detwiller, Mrs. Edward H. Ladd and Mr. Paul Westergard

1963 Mr. Charles Detwiller

Thursday, December 17, 1964 The Courier News

Plainfield Garden Club Meets in Lee House, Scotch Plains

The Plainfield Garden Club was entertained yesterday in historic Lee House, home of Mr. and Mrs. William P. Elliott at 11 Black Birch Rd., Scotch Plains.

Two new members were welcomed by Mrs. Wayne J. Holman, president. Co-hostesses were Mrs. Victor King and Mrs. James R. Bird.

Mrs. Bird introduced the program of readings on "The Symbols and Legends of Christmas" given by Mrs. A. D. Seybold and Mrs. King. As the symbols were describe, they were displayed b Mrs. Benson Wigton Jr.

A letter of congratulations from Mayor Robert C. Maddox to the club member Mrs. Alden DeHart has received a state award in the "Green Thumb Competition" of the New Jersey Tercentenary Commission for her work as chairman of the grounds committee of Drake House.

A member of the Plainfield Historical Society, she supervised outdoor plantain at the museum with funds for the planting donated by the Plainfield Garden Club. She also was awarded a special rose bush which will be planted at Drake House in her name in the spring.

Presiding at the tea table were Mrs. Holman, Mrs. William S. Tyler, Mrs. Webster Sandford, Mrs. Noah C. Barnhart, Mrs. J. Harold Loizeaux and Mrs. Charles H. Detwiller.

Thursday, December 17, 1964 The Courier News

The Courier-News
Plainfield, N. J., Thursday, December 17, 1964

Garden Club Entertained at Historic Lee House

By VICTORIA FURMAN
(Club Member)

The Plainfield Garden Club was entertained yesterday by Mr. and Mrs. William P. Elliott in the historic Lee House, located at 11 Black Birch Rd., Scotch Plains.

The ghosts of the historic homestead must be rattling their skeletons with joy this Christmas season because at last, through the efforts of the owners, the house has achieved the charm and beauty it deserves.

The guests stepped over the threshold to a scene of great charm. In the center hall stood a Christmas tree on which members hung gifts of candy, wrapped as ornaments. Later the gifts were taken to Lyons Veterans Hospital where for many years the club has contributed greens and gifts at Christmas.

The president, Mrs. Wayne J. Holman, conducted the meeting and welcomed two new members. The hostess, a member of the club, was assisted by Mrs. Victor King and Mrs. James R. Bird.

Stormy History
A varied and sometimes stormy history has characterized Lee House since 1725, when the original small structure was built at the corner of Cooper and Terrill Rds., by the Lee family. During the Revolutionary War, the house was on the line of march of both British and Colonial armies, and many a tired soldier warmed his feet at its open fires.

The little house was moved to Raritan Rd. in 1828, to be joined to another farmhouse built in 1750 by Moses Frazee. One hundred thirty-five years later, Mr. and Mrs. Elliott had the house moved to its present location. Barns and other small buildings were moved also, and now are grouped around Lee House in companionable symmetry.

The Elliotts have added a wing to the house and restored the old brick and stone, the ceiling beams and original floor boards to keep it authentic Early American home.

The program was announced by Mrs. Bird. Readings on "The Symbols and Legends of Christmas" were given by Mrs. A. D. Seybold and Mrs. King, with incidental music played on the harp b 12-year old Joyce Heiman. As the symbols were described, they were displayed by Mrs. Benson Wigton Jr.

The first of the symbols, an "Advent Wreath," was made of evergreens with four white candles, which are traditionally lighted one at a time on each of the four Sundays during the Advent Season.

Gold Angel
A gold angel brought from Oberammergau, Germany by Mrs. Seybold, was displayed as the second symbol. The reading explained that angels are used throughout the world in forms varying from rough clay figures to the finest of wood carvings and porcelains.

Among symbolic Christmas greens are holly, ivy and mistletoe. Long ago it was thought that holly was the man's plant, ivy the woman's and the one brought into the house first indicated which sex would rule the house that year.

Bells, used to proclaim the joyful tidings, were shown and that beloved yuletide symbol, the Christmas Tree. According to one story, Martin Luther in 1528 cut down a small evergreen tree and carried it into his house, where he fastened candles to the branches and lighted them to share with his family the wonders of the Christmas sky.

A beautiful creche was shown as the most holy and revered symbol. The program ended with angelic tones of the harm and the beloved Christmas blessing, "Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace, good will toward men."

Afterwards guests adjourned to the dining room to exchange greetings before the centuries old fireplace. The tea table was decorated with brilliant red poinsettia massed in an old brass milk pan. Brass candlesticks and an antique samovar, from which coffee was served, completed the picture of early American hospitality.

Presiding at the tea table at intervals were Mrs. Wayne J. Holman, Mrs. William S. Tyler, Mrs. Webster Sandford, Mrs. Noah C. Barnhart, Mrs. J. Harold Loizeaux and Mrs. Charles H. Detwiller Jr.

1990 Application for the GCA Zone IV Historic Preservation Award: Marge Eillott

1990 Application for the GCA Zone IV Historic Preservation Award: Marge Elliott

Thursday, April 17, 1975 Scotch Plains-Fanwood, N. J.

Caption: Mrs. Leonard Sachar presents "Bouquet of Thanks" to Mrs. William P. Elliott as all members of the Bicentennial Committee and all guests join in the applause for a job well and beautifully done.

It was All Bustles, Bonnets and Bows at Shackamaxon

Scotch Plains stepped back into its past Saturday, as dozens of models demonstrated the appropriate manner of dress through bygone years. The event was a luncheon-fashion show, entitled "From Bustles, Bonnets, Bloomers to Bikinis." It was the first major undertaking of the Scotch Plains American Revolution Bicentennial Committee, and if the full house is any clue of what's to come, Scotch Plains Bicentennial activities will be overwhelmingly supported.

The show features over 60 outfits, running the gamut from the 1700's to the present. The costumes came from local attics from Drake House Museum in Plainfield, from old time residents such as Mrs. Clarence Slocum, Mrs. Walter Van Hoesen, Mrs. A. E. Duell and Mr. and Mrs. William Elliott; and from such modern manufacturers as Jantzen Swim Wear.

Mrs. William P. Elliott was chairman of the event.

As they were modeled by members of the Historical Society, Women's Club (afternoon, evening and junior divisions), College and Suburban clubs, they were described by narrator Mrs. Elizabeth Brown of Princeton, lecturer and a member of the Costume Society of America. She stressed the manner in which fashion repeats itself through the ages, pointing out the rotating lengthening and shortening of skirts.

There were "oohs and aahs" for many of the creations, from delicately embroidered 18th century gowns to modern day bikini, topped by a patriotically red-white-blue striped robe. Katherine Detwiller, wife of Charles Detwiller, president of the local Historical Society, wore an 1875 gown which had belonged to her grandmother-in-law. It was a summer organdy with overskirt in front and rear. Also from the 1860's or 70's was a yachting dress of green satin ribbon and white organdy, worn by Mrs. F. Gregg Burger. Fancy hooped and crinolined dresses weren't the only fashions which attracted attention, however. From 1905 there was an Annapolis uniform, and from 1913 era, a Wellsley gym suit. Arlene Emery modeled a 1940's Hollywood Original dress with shoulder pads, while Lynn Rupp appeared in a black satin strapless short gown she wore at Penn State in the 1950's. The show ran the gamut from informality, evidenced by an 1890's bathing suit and shoes to a very formal black velvet and silver ball gown worn to Calvin Coolidge's inauguration in 1915.

1973-1974 PGC Directory

1974-1975 Directory

February 28, 1980

February 28, 1980

1970 Letter to the Editor of the development of Madison Park by Charles Detwiller

Plainfield Historical Society Memorabilia From the Archives of Barbara Tracy Sandford

This is a sampling of materials saved by Barbara Sandford in her "Plainfield Historical Society" file.

Plainfield Historical Society Memorabilia

Index (73 pages)

May 14, 1983 Centennial The Wardlaw Hartridge School

Giggleswick by Marjorie Blackman Elliott, 1989

1985-1986 Year Book of the Plainfield Garden Club

1985-1986 Year Book of the Plainfield Garden Club

1993-1994 Year Book of the Plainfield Garden Club

Cocktail party circa 1984 at Bev Reid's

Ginny Rushmore on left. Standing next to her, Cath Detwiller?

Ned King and former wife Yasmina on right

Joan Hunziker facing away with white pocketbook.

Cocktail party circa 1984 at Bev Reid's

Liz Nash speaking to Fanny Day
Cath Detwiller and her sister Mrs. Davis speaking to Peg Tyler on right

(There are some that feel the lady in the green is not Dot Davis . . . ?)

Club History by Anne Marie v. G. Seybold

1965-1985 History of the Plainfield Garden Club by Anne Marie v. G. Seybold

Exhibition

In 1979 we started to have three members providing arrangements for the membership meetings. We entered the Newark Museum's Christmas tree competition where Mrs. Charles Detwiller and Mrs. Eric Pfefferkorn won a red ribbon with the Mexican theme entry.

At the Zone IV Meeting Flower Show Mrs. Dwight Zeller won a second and Mrs. Robert Hackman an honorable mention.

January 12, 2014 Release of Barbara Tracy Sandford's 1969 slides

The year 1969 was memorable. The nation's headlines were filled with news of Nixon's 1st year in the White House; anti-Vietnam War demonstrations; Woodstock; Neil Armstrong's walk on the Moon; and the Miracle Mets.

Barbara Sandford was busy here in Plainfield with beautifying the new public library and park; inspiring the Club with the Vest Pocket Park civic project; and finally garnering some recognition from the mayor's office for her efforts. See it all here: 1969 Plainfield

**Mr. Detwiller was thanked for his work with the Plainfield Beautification Committee.

Anne Louise Davis Home on Tour

April 18, 2014

NJ Festival Orchestra Tour of Notable Homes set for May 10 in Westfield

"There are five diverse homes on the tour this year. One "must see," home, according to Colamedici, is a romantic converted carriage house once part of the manor house that faces Prospect Avenue. The conversion was executed in 1940 by Plainfield's prolific architect, Charles C. Detwiller for the legendary doyenne, Anne Louise Davis."

www.njfestivalorchestra.org

April 22, 2014 Email from Frederic C. Detwiller

Susan,

Thank you for the news alert... It is good to know that our Dad CH "Det" and Aunt "Weezie" are still appreciated in the old home town!

Regards,

Rick D.

August 30, 2014 Charles Detwiller & The Architects of Plainfield

Exhibit of Detwiller Collection drawings opens at Library

The Plainfield Public Library is mounting an exhibition from its Detwiller Collection of architectural drawings in honor of New Jersey's 350th anniversary.

Plainfield architect Charles H. Detwiller, Jr., [Husband of PGC Honorary Member Mrs. Charles H. (Catherine or "Cath" Campbell) Detwiller, Jr. '57] is credited with rescuing thousands of architectural drawings that were being disposed of by the City by dumping from an upper floor window at City Hall into a dumpster in the parking lot.

The collection of over 16,000 items representing over 500 architects documents over a century of residential and commercial architecture in the Plainfield area. Its record of the architectural history of a suburban community is unique in the United States.

Among its outstanding items of interest are drawings of the Fire Headquarters on Central Avenue designed by African-American architect George Ernest Robinson, designed in 1925 and listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

The exhibit culls 70 pieces from thirty-five sets of drawings by 24 architects. It is displayed on walls and in display cases on both levels of the Library.

Preservation of these aging documents began in 1998. The conservation and digitizing of the collection is still ongoing. This work is entirely supported through grant funding and volunteer efforts. Local funders include the Plainfield Foundation and the Friends of the Plainfield Public Library.

The exhibit opens September 2 and runs through October during regular library hours. For more information on the Detwiller Collection, contact Sarah Hull, head of the Local History Department at (908) 757-1111 x136.

To arrange group visits, call (908) 757-1111 x129. The Plainfield Public Library is at Park Avenue and West 8th Street and is an accessible facility. Parking is available in the 8th and 9th Street lots.

In addition to Mr. Detwiller's wife, Cath, his aunt, mother-in-law and sister-in-law were all Notable Members of the Plainfield Garden Club.

Miss Laura Cecelia Detwiller '29
Mrs. William Hall (Mabel C. Raper) Campbell '28
Mrs. F. Edgar (Dorothy Campbell) Davis '60

Good architecture and good gardening are two things that go together well. No where is this better demonstrated than in the families that formed the Plainfield Garden Club.

Here is an excerpt from an article about the building of the Nebraska State Capitol:

McKim, Mead & White Architects of New York had designed the Rhode Island State House in Providence, Rhode Island that was constructed from 1895–1904. McKim, Mead & White was one of the most prestigious and internationally recognized architectural firms of this era. The firm was a major training ground for other prominent architects of the period.

Tracy & Swartwout of New York had designed the Missouri State Capitol in Jefferson City, Missouri that was constructed from 1913 –1917. Both Evarts Tracy and Egerton Swartwout were former associates of McKim, Mead & White.

Of the other eight teams in the competition including John Russell Pope of New York, Bertram Goodhue of New York, Paul Cret in association with Zantzinger, Borie & Medary of Philadelphia, Harold Van Buren Magonigle of New York, and Bliss & Faville of San Francisco, Ellery Davis of Lincoln, John Latenser & Sons of Omaha, and Allan McDonald of Omaha several individual architects had worked for McKim, Meade & White at one time or another including Magonigle and Bliss.

No doubt many of these famous early 20th century American architects were more than familiar with Plainfield and the garden club. In addition to Mr. Detwiller, here are member files that chronicle these architects:

Mead, Mrs. Frederick Goodhue (Marie Louise Myers) '15
Tracy, Mrs. Evarts '22
Tracy, Mrs. Howard Crosby (Minerva Bingham Lamson) '15
Tracy, Mrs. J. Evarts (Caroline Frederica Streuli) '22
de Hart, Mrs. Alden (Dorothy Voorhis) '38, President 1949 - 1950

Charles H. Detwiller, Sr. (1863 - 1940)

Columbia University Libraries

The C. H. Detwiller Columbia 1885 Collection was a gift from his grandson, Frederic C. Detwiller, to Avery Library in 2006. Born in 1863, Charles H. Detwiller was in the first class of architecture students in the School of Mines at Columbia University, graduating with a bachelor's degree in 1885. As a practicing architect, Detwiller maintained offices in New York City and New Jersey for several decades, establishing a brief partnership in the 1890s with architect George E. Melendy. Detwiller died in New Jersey in 1940.

This small collection contains primarily Detwiller's student drawings, notes, course materials, books, class photographs, and graduation announcements from the period of his study at Columbia University from 1881 to 1885. These materials are supplemented by Detwiller's childhood sketchbooks, a diary, several drawings created by Detwiller as a professional architect, and other scrapbooks and ephemeral items relating to Detwiller's family and personal interests, spanning the years 1874 to 1940.

Dr. Albert K. Detwiller

Dr. Albert K. Detwiller

August 27, 2014 The Charles H. Detwiller, Jr. Architectural Drawings Collection, 1887 - 2002

From: hanw@plainfieldwatch.org
To:
Subject: The Charles H. Detwiller, Jr. Architectural Drawings
Collection, 1887-2002.
Date: Thu, 4 Sep 2014 05:18:44 -0700

***FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE***
Date: August 27, 2014
Contact: Sarah Hull, Head of Local History
Plainfield Public Library
908-757-1111, x136


The Charles H. Detwiller, Jr. Architectural Drawings Collection, 1887-2002.

The Plainfield Public Library announces a new exhibition in honor of
New Jersey's 350th anniversary celebration (NJ350). The library is
displaying never-before seen examples from its collection of historical
blueprints that date back to 1887. The 70-piece exhibit consists of
wall exhibits and display cases on both levels of the library. The
featured blueprints represent thirty-five different sets of drawings by
24 architects. The oldest drawing on exhibit is of the Plainfield Golf
Club dating from 1896.

The Charles H. Detwiller, Jr. Architectural Drawings Collection
contains over 16,000 sets of drawings, documenting over a century of
residential and commercial architecture in the greater Plainfield area.
This collection of blueprints that document the growth of a suburban
community is unique in the United States.

Over 500 architects are represented, including African-American
architect George Ernest Robinson, who was a nationally known architect
in firehouse design. Plainfield's Fire Headquarters building, designed
by him in 1925, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
Preservation of the aging documents began by the library in 1998. The
processing of the collection is still ongoing. The cost of
microfilming, digitization, and cataloging is entirely supported
through grant funding and volunteer assistance. Major funders include
The Institute for Museum and Library Services; The New Jersey
Historical Commission, a division of the Department of State; the
Plainfield Foundation; and the Friends of the Plainfield Public
Library.
The exhibition opens September 1, 2014 and will run through October.
It is free to the public. The Plainfield Public Library is located at
800 Park Avenue. For hours of operation, call 908-757-1111 or check
the website at plainfieldlibrary.info<http://plainfieldlibrary.info>.
To arrange for group visits, call 908-757-1111 ext. 129.



Sarah Hull, Archivist
Head of Local History, Special Collections & Genealogy
Plainfield Public Library<http://www.plainfieldlibrary.info/>
800 Park Avenue
Plainfield, NJ 07060
(908) 757-1111 ext. 136

Monday Afternoon Club Membership

Monday Afternoon Club Membership

Monday Afternoon Club Membership

Monday Afternoon Club Membership

Monday Afternoon Club Membership

August 8, 2015

Library offers trove of vintage Plainfield home blueprints for sale

Plainfield homeowners and history buffs are getting a one-of-a-kind opportunity as the Plainfield Public Library prepares to offer upwards of 3,000 blueprint originals from its Detwiller Collection for sale to the public.

The blueprints offered for sale are part of a trove of many thousands recovered from a dumpster at City Hall by the late Plainfield architect and artist Charles Detwiller.

While many of Plainfield's grand homes and mansion are among the blueprints (though fewer than originally, owing to some 'fingering' before strict controls were put in place), the appeal of the collection will be stronger for those who live in or admire the more modest vintage homes from the turn of the 20th century to the World War II era.

These homes include many classic Tudors and other 'cottage' and 'revival' styles, as well as 'foursquares', ranches and Cape Cods and more contemporary stules.

These represent the bulk of Plainfield's building stock from its most expansive period and they were often enough improved or expanded – giving rise to the need for plans showing the original building and the proposed alterations to be filed with the City's inspections department.

It is those blueprints, which have now been cataloged and digitized, that are being offered for sale. In library parlance, they have been de-accessioned, meaning that they no longer need be kept permanently by the Library and are available for dispostion to private parties.

The Library has a portal to the Charles Detwiller Blueprint Collection on its website (see here) and has made a complete list of the blueprints for sale also available online (see here).

The list is alphabetized by street name, and then number. However, I would advise reading the Library's instructions closely so you make the proper notations for your request (see here) – easing the staff's task in finding the item(s) in which you are interested. Paying attention to the suggested time frames needed and numbers of items per request will help you avoid headaches. So, please read and follow the instructions carefully – as carpenters like to say, 'measure twice, cut once'.

The sale will run from September 1 to November 13, 2015 in a two-step process –

You check the offerings to find items that interest you, making careful notations; and

You and the Library work out a pick-up appointment, at which you will be able to view the actual items and make a final decision on your purchase.

Single-page blueprints are priced at $50 each and multiple-page sets at $100. Cash or credit cards are fine, but the Library will not accept personal checks.

Proceeds of the sale will be used to finance the further digitization of the blueprint collection – meaning that we can look forward to another offering of materials at some future point.

The Detwiller Collection is absolutely unique in its size and scope, covering decades of Plainfield history and thousands of buildings throughout the city. Plainfield residents owe Charlie Detwiller a debt of gratitude for his perspicacity that cannot be repaid.

And we owe a debt of gratitude to Library Director Joe Da Rold for the vision that saw in these rescued documents an invaluable resource for the community, and devised means and methods of ensuring these fragile records would be available to Plainfield residents permanently through having them digitized.

EDITOR'S NOTE:
Mr. Detwiller is the late husband of PGC Honorary member Cath Detwiller. Mr. Detwiller's Aunt Laura was a long-time member of the PGC and a very talented botanical artist. Read about the Detwiller family here:

Detwiller, Mrs. Charles H. (Catherine or "Cath" Campbell), Jr. '57

Detwiller, Miss Laura Cecelia '29

And Mr. Detwiller's in-laws:

Campbell, Mrs. William Hall (Mabel C. Raper) '28

Davis, Mrs. F. Edgar (Dorothy or "Dottie" Campbell) '60

Hillside Historic District

August 29, 2015

Hillside Historic District has announced a new website: http://hillsideavenuedistrict.com

They have neatly listed the homes in the district in a similar fashion to our Homes & Gardens page.

It is no exaggeration to say that the PGC helped build Hillside. In fact our first club meeting took place at Mrs. Connor's home at 999 Hillside. Take a look at our PGC Hillside Historic District resident members:

807 Hillside Avenue
Browne, Miss Elizabeth B. '37

810 Hillside Avenue
Barnhart, Mrs. Noah Chisholm (Susan Stevens) '15

816 Hillside Avenue
Zerega, Miss Bertha Virginia '23

817 Hillside Avenue
Lawton, Mrs. Richard M. (Edith Clarke) '21

832 Hillside Avenue
Yates, Mrs. Frederick Washburn (Bertha Kedzie Cornwell) '15

921 Hillside Avenue
Detwiller, Miss Laura Cecelia '29
Detwiller, Mrs. Charles H. (Catherine or "Cath" Campbell), Jr. '57

922 Hillside Avenue
Atterbury, Mrs. Albert Hoffman (Emma H. Baker) '15

930 Hillside Avenue
Corey, Mrs. Ella J. '15

937 Hillside Avenue
Hunn, Mrs. John T. Sharpless (Hope Ivins) '37
Ivins, Mrs. DeWitt Clinton (Louise Morton Fox) '15
Ivins, Mrs. Clinton Fox (Marguerite Carpenter) '33

945 Hillside Avenue
Stevens, Mrs. Horace N. (Helen Coburn) '15

950 Hillside Avenue
Harlow, Mrs. Edward Dexter (Elise Cochran Martin) '15
Martin, Mrs. Francis A. (Mary Keech Turner) '22

955 Hillside Avenue
Wallace, Mrs. Frederick W. (Grace Seccomb) '15
deForest, Mrs. Henry Lockwood (Amy Brighthurst Brown) '33

966 Hillside Avenue
Warren, Mrs. Frank D. '15

970 Hillside Avenue
Barnhart, Mrs. Noah Chisholm (Susan Stevens) '15
Kroll, Mrs. Alexander (Nancy Dwinnell or Mrs. Prince H. Gordon) '60

975 Hillside Avenue
Runkle, Mrs. Harry Godley (Jennie Fitz Randolph) '15
Albin, Mrs. Leland D. (Jennie Hoag) '36
King, Mrs. Victor E. D. (Yasmina S.) '78
Whitehead, Mrs. James Harold (Jean Fitz-Randolph Heiberg) '43

980 Hillside Avenue
Hall, Mrs. Frederic L. (Anne Garrigues Wigton) '68
Stuart, Mrs. Linden (Jeanette W.), Jr. '52
Wigton, Mrs. Charles Benson (Garrigues) '45

982 Hillside Avenue
Baker, Mrs. Clifford Myron (Margaret Drayton) '32
Valiant, Mrs. John (Katharine Drayton) '40

985 Hillside Avenue
Stevens, Mrs. John Peters ("J.P.") '15
Stevens, Mrs. Horace Nathaniel (Helen Coburn) '15
Stevens, Mrs. John Peters ("J.P."), Jr. (Edith S.) '37
Stevens, Mrs. Robert Ten Broeck (Dorothy Goodwin Whitney) '37

996 Hillside Avenue
Wallace, Mrs. Frederick W. (Grace Seccomb) '15
Murray Townsend
Mooney, Mrs. Wandell McMaster (Alice Joy McGee) '47

999 Hillside Avenue
Conner, Mrs. William A. (Florence Tupper) '15
Wigton, Mrs. William Garrigues (Ann Hayes) '55

1000 Hillside Avenue
Lawrence, Mrs. Chester B. (Florence B.), Jr. '22

1005 Hillside Avenue
McWilliams, Mrs. Howard (Anna Louise Waldbridge/Mrs. Paul Taylor Brown) '22

1007 Hillside Avenue
Lockwood, Mrs. Frederick M. (Hazel Marshall) '52
Marshall, Mrs. Henry P. (Dorothy Burke) '30

1009 Hillside Avenue
Tracy, Mrs. Evarts '22
Tracy, Mrs. Howard Crosby (Minerva Bingham Lamson) '15
Tracy, Mrs. J. Evarts (Caroline Frederica Streuli) '22

1019 Hillside Avenue
Baker, Mrs. Clifford Myron (Margaret Drayton) '28

1030 Hillside Avenue
Stillman, Mrs. William Maxson (Ethel Lucile Titsworth) '42

1035 Hillside Avenue
Streuli, Mrs. Alfred F. H. (Frederica Michelle Dwyer Hooper) '15

1045 Hillside Avenue
Timpson, Mrs. Lewis Gouverneur (Helen Frances Waring) '15
Waring, Mrs. Orville G. (Dorothy Fleming) '35

1046 Hillside Avenue
Genung, Mrs. Alfred Gawthrop (Dorothy or "Dot" Madsen) '69
Madsen, Mrs. John (Evelyn or "Evie" Wilson) '70

1300 Prospect Avenue
Streuli, Mrs. Alfred F. H. (Frederica Michelle Dwyer Hooper) '15
Tracy, Mrs. J. Evarts (Caroline Frederica Streuli) '22

1234 Watchung Avenue
Stevenson, Mrs. E. Vickers '41

1239 Watchung Avenue
Brown, Miss Edna M. '34

Mrs. Charles Henry (Catherine or "Cath" Campbell) Detwiller, Jr. '57

Hello PGC,

I don't know where the Stevens' portrait might be, but attached is the portrait of my mother Catherine Campbell Detwiller by Gerry Acomb that I promised to send back in 2012. Apparently you already have the photo of her with the portrait taken when she was 96. She is now living in Westwood, MA, going on 100 and just celebrated Thanksgiving with us all at our brother Chip's house in Groton MA.

Regards,

Rick D.

Email sent November 30, 2015 in response to an inquiry for another Acomb painting of Mrs. Stevens

Acomb, Mrs. Frederick G. (Geraldine de M. Goutiere) '62
Stevens, Mrs. Horace N. (Helen Coburn) '15

Directory Listing July 1, 2016

Detwiller, Cath '57

Fox Hill Village #220
10 Longwood Drive
Westwood, MA 02090
(617) 329-4072

Husband: Charles H.

July 17, 2016

DETWILLER, Catherine

(Campbell) 100, of Westwood, MA, died July 13 with her family by her side. Mrs. Detwiller was born in Plainfield, NJ in 1916. She had a sister Dorothy C. Davis and a brother William H. Campbell, both deceased. In Watchung, NJ, her parents, William H. and Mabel R. Campbell, built her childhood home "Hillcrest" whose gardens (in the Smithsonian's Garden Club of America's collection) inspired her life-long interest in gardening. Her family moved to Plainfield, where she went to Hartridge School and later attended Parson's School of Design. Later, she worked in the studio of noted couturier Muriel King. In 1941, she married NJ architect Charles H. Detwiller, Jr. with whom she had four children: Charles H. Detwiller, III (wife Carly Nichols) of Groton, Deborah D. (husband H. Ashley Smith, Jr.) of Lenox, Frederic C. (wife Ellen Moloney) of Georgetown and Laurie C. (husband David A. Sorensen) of Dover. A member of Crescent Avenue Church in Plainfield, NJ, she played in the bell choir, and later became a member of the Village Church in Wellesley, MA. In the 1960s in Plainfield and Edison, NJ, she and her husband were involved in the merger of the Wardlaw-Hartridge Country Day School, which they had both attended. Mrs. Detwiller also owned and operated her children's boutique "Carriage Trade" at the Stage House Village, restored by her husband Charles, in Scotch Plains, NJ. A longtime member of the Plainfield Garden Club, she exhibited and won prizes for her floral arrangements at the local and International Garden Club shows in NY. At their home, "The Farm," on Clarke's Lane in Scotch Plains, she enjoyed country living with her family. She and her husband were active members of the Plainfield Country Club and both the Plainfield and Scotch Plains Historical Societies. Resident for a time at "Giggleswick" in Edison, NJ, she spent many happy summers at Cape Cod on Pilgrim Road in Harwichport and at Skinequit Pond in South Harwich, where she was a member of the Stone Horse Yacht Club and Wychmere Harbor Club. In 1993, Mrs. Detwiller became a resident of Fox Hill Village in Westwood, MA. Her lifelong interest in arts and crafts led to exhibits of her hand-crafted hooked rugs of her own design there and at the Wenham Museum. She is survived by her 4 children, 7 grandchildren and 11 great grandchildren, many of whom she inspired with her artistic clothing designs, needlepoint, hooked rugs, doll houses, miniature rooms, and items knit for various charities. A memorial service will be held at Wellesley Village Church at 11 on Thursday, July 21. Burial will be private. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to charities of your choice.

Holden-Dunn-Lawler

www.hdlfuneralhome.net
Published in The Boston Globe on July 17, 2016
- See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/bostonglobe/obituary.aspx?n=catherine-detwiller&pid=180679706&eid=sp_shareobit#sthash.bc40YaUH.dpuf

Email Rec'd July 17, 2016

To All Wardlaw-Hartridge Alumni,

We are sad to report that our mother Catherine C. Detwiller died this past Wednesday, a month after her 100th birthday. Cath went to Hartridge where she met her husband Charles H. Detwiller, Jr. in kindergarten. Cath and Det, as they were known to friends, were married In 1941 and had four children, all of whom attended Wardlaw-Hartridge: Charles H. Detwiller III (wife Carly Nichols) of Groton, Deborah D. (husband H. Ashley Smith, Jr.) of Lenox, Frederic C. (wife Ellen Moloney) of Georgetown and Laurie C. (husband David A. Sorensen) of Dover. In the 1960s in Plainfield and Edison, NJ, she and her husband were involved in the merger of the Wardlaw-Hartridge Country Day School they had both attended. They worked closely with headmaster Prentice and his wife Betty Horne. Mrs. Detwiller also owned and operated her children's boutique "Carriage Trade" at the Stage House Village, restored by her husband Charles, in Scotch Plains, NJ. A longtime member of the Plainfield Garden Club, she exhibited and won prizes for her floral arrangements at the local and International Garden Club shows in NY. At their home, "The Farm," on Clarke's Lane in Scotch Plains, she enjoyed country living with her family. She and her husband were active members of the Plainfield Country Club and both the Plainfield and Scotch Plains Historical Societies.
Anyone who would like to read her full story may find it at:
http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/bostonglobe/obituary.aspx…
A few photos are attached. We realize not many people will be able to get to the memorial service, but we look forward to seeing some of our old Wardlaw-Hartidge and Plainfield friends in the future.

Regards,

Rick D.


Frederic C. Detwiller
New England Landmarks
302 Central St.
Georgetown, MA 01833

email: rick.detwiller@comcast.net
Tel: 617-640-4935 or 978-352-2819

Cath & B Horne Wardlaw School 1963

Catherine Campbell Charles H. Detwiller c. 1922 Oak and Ivy

Cath & Det (2nd and 4th from right) 1920's Hartridge School

www.legacy.com

Garden Club member, and whose husband donated thousands of blueprints of Plainfield homes to the Library.
Best, Dan


Dan Damon
908.448.7688
plaindan@gmail.com