Plainfield Garden Club








Member: Sandford, Mrs. Webster (Barbara Tracy) '50

President: 1960-1962

Garden Club of America Zone IV (NJ) Director: 1986-1988
GCA Zone IV Medal Awards Representative: 1988 - 1990
GCA Board of Associates: 1990 - 2013

GARDEN CLUB OF AMERICA CLUB AWARDS:
Medal of Merit
1972 Mrs. Webster Sandford

GARDEN CLUB OF AMERICA MEDALISTS:
Zone Civic Improvement Award
1985 Mrs. Webster Sandford

PLAINFIELD GARDEN CLUB AWARDS:
The Barbara Sandford Award
Awarded each year at the discretion of the Conservation Chairman to a member deserving of recognition in the conservation field.
2004 Mrs. Webster Sandford
2006 Mrs. Duncan Alexander and Mrs. Webster Sandford

The Past Presidents Award
Given at the discretion of the Past Presidents of the Plainfield Garden Club to a member whose contributions over the years have been significant and noteworthy.
2009 Mrs. Webster Sandford


OTHER GARDEN CLUB OF AMERICA AWARDS:
North American Wildlife Foundation
1961 Certificate for donating one acre in The Great Swamp

Veterans Administration Voluntary Services
1955 Certificate for volunteer services at Lyons Hospital

Sears, Roebuck & Co.
1963 Award and grant ($200.00) for Improvement of Drake House as Historic Site

April 1999 Honored with the Stafford Award by Scenic America for her "exceptional lifetime effort to control billboards and to protect our natural beauty."

1950 - 1953 Treasurer Book: Sandford, Mrs. Webster Listed under "Junior Members" In the 1950 -1951 Treasurer Book, dated May 29.

In-law's home, the Sandfords, 443 Stelle Avenue

Barbara passed away Labor Day, Monday, September 2, 2013

Donations to the Plainfield Garden Club in Barbara's Memory can be sent to:

Plainfield Garden Club
640 East Broad Street
Westfield, New Jersey 07090

Please note the check "In Memoriam Barbara Sandford"


**CLICK ON PHOTOS TO ENLARGE**

November 20, 2013 The Plainfield Garden Club Remembers Barbara Sandford

[It is Club tradition that when a member passes away, another member is asked to write a memorial which is read at a meeting. Barbara, who had written so many of these memorials, would have been pleased that her friend Tucker Trimble, a national officer of the Garden Club of America, was selected. In keeping with tradition, the membership stood as Tucker read aloud the following.]

When I joined the Plainfield Garden Club in 1993 Barbara Sandford was already a living legend. Thanks to the loving care and technological knowledge of Susan Fraser, we all can see how her well-lived life impacted not only our Garden Club but also our town, State and Country. Two personal memories stand out in my mind.

At one of my earliest Flower Shows held at the Crescent Avenue Church, it was my duty to Clerk for the outside Judges. We all know how stressful flower shows can be and this time was no exception. The judges were already in the middle of their hallowed consultations when the door opened and in walked Barbara, arrangement in hand. She plopped it on a pedestal, said something about being late, and walked out. No entry card, no passing of the entry. I was starting to say something, anything, when a judge whispered "That was Barbara Sandford". Needless to say, her entry was judged and received an award. This is the only time in all my judging experience that an entry was accepted after the time-frame allowed.

In the year 2000, as President of the Club, I attended the Annual Meeting in Cleveland, Ohio. At the last minute our Delegate could not attend and Barbara very graciously agreed to go so that our Club would have proper representation. We roomed together and had a ball. Every evening she would call Victor King and they would chat for almost half and hour, talking about their days. In those years she and Victor would have dinner together every day. After one call I asked "Barbara – are you going to marry him?" and she snorted at me "Tucker, would you want to marry someone who is almost 90 years old?"

Many of us here have been to Annual Meetings and know how all the stops are pulled out at the Awards Dinner, which ends the meeting. That time was no exception. We walked up the curving broad stairs of the Union Club in Cleveland, and Barbara recounted to me an earlier memory which had taken place there. She and her father had used those same stairs when she made her debut there almost 63 years earlier, and Scots pipers had lined the stairs and played as they passed. Barbara told me that night Webster Sandford was also in attendance and – well – the rest is history.

Barbara leaves a rich memory for our Club. Her memorial service this past weekend was inspiring – hearing about her life and the choices and decisions she made. Hers was always the first hand up when something needed to be done. For years she attended the NAL meeting in Washington DC, at her own expense, so we could keep track of what was happening on the national Conservation front.

Barbara's daughter Cindy said something on Saturday that resonated with me. She said that when her husband died, Barbara was still very much "Mrs. Webster Sandford", after the formal conventions of that day. But somewhere along the line, she became – for all of us – Barbara Sandford.

Respectfully submitted,
Tucker Trimble

November 20, 2013

Books, Bats & Business - Plus Tucker's Farewell to Barbara

November 16, 2013

Celebration of the Life of Barbara Tracy Sandford

September 2, 2013 Barbara Tracy Sandford

Photo taken Arbor Day 2009 by Bernice Paglia


Barbara Tracy Sandford died on September 2, 2013 at her summer home of 75 years on Lake Wentworth, Wolfeboro, New Hampshire. She was 94. Her extended family of 37 was with her this summer attending the wedding of her grand-daughter.

Barbara was the second daughter of Florence Comey and Jared Tracy of Cleveland, Ohio. She graduated from Hathaway Brown School and attended Colby Junior College (now Colby-Sawyer) in New London, NH. New London was the summer home of her grandmother, Jane Foote Tracy, also of Cleveland.

In 1938, she married Webster Sandford, a partner at White & Case, NYC, and they resided in Plainfield, NJ, with their six children. Barbara raised her family with love, learning, and fun, as well as the responsibility to improve life for all.

Barbara was passionate about many subjects: conservation, beautification, and the environment; music, both performing and listening; Planned Parenthood; politics; and her church. But most of all, she was passionate about her extended family.

She was President of the Plainfield Garden Club (1960-62), and actively involved with its projects at Shakespeare Garden and Drake House Museum. The Garden Club established the Barbara Sandford Conservation Award in her honor. She received this award twice. In 1985 she was the Zone IV Chair. She received the Zone award for Civic Improvement from the Garden Club of America. Barbara also served on the Plainfield Beautification Committee and was chair of the Plainfield Shade Tree Commission. Amidst the political turmoil in the 1960s, she led the effort to involve children in planting their own vegetable gardens, (including nutrition, cooking, and preserving the vegetables) on vacant lots donated by the City of Plainfield. She marched in the Arbor Day Parade as "Aunty Litter" (anti-litter) with a garbage can on wheels and a broom. She was a leader in conservation and recycling which resulted in the establishment of the Recycling Transfer Station. An avid "hands-on" participant, she planted, watered, and weeded the public gardens throughout Plainfield.

Other organizations claimed her skills and energy: Girl Scout Troop Leader of a "mounted (on horses)" troop in the late 1930s and Brownie and Girl Scout troops in the 1940s; Junior League of Plainfield; Muhlenberg Hospital Auxiliary; Planned Parenthood of Plainfield including marching in Washington for reproductive freedom; League of Women Voters; and Crescent Avenue Presbyterian Church as an Elder, Deacon, and Sunday School teacher. She was a member of the Shakespeare Society. She played the violin with the Plainfield Symphony which named the Principle Second Violin Chair in her honor. Later in her life, she became a member of the Colonial Dames in New Jersey.

In Wolfeboro, she was a Trustee of the Lake Wentworth Foundation and a Lifetime Member of the Lake Wentworth Association. She was passionate about preserving the water quality of the lake and participated in the NH Lakes Lay Fish Condition Program. She provided private space for the eagles, loons, and even snapping turtles to birth and care for their young. She was a life-long sailor and rowed her skiff each morning. She drove her 1931 Ford woodie, Oscar, dressed as a loon in the July 4 parade.

These extensive volunteer activities led to leadership in environmental organizations on the state and national level. She was a founder and served as President of the Roadside Council of NJ. She was a founding director of Scenic America in 1982 and received the Stafford Award in 1999, their highest honor. She was a director of the Garden Club of America and in 1976 she was awarded the Medal of Merit. She worked endlessly to save the Great Swamp Watershed Area, the Revolutionary War Trenches in the Watchung Mountains, NJ, Blue Star Memorial Highways and the NJ Pine Barrens. Her frequent train trips to Washington, DC, to lobby Senators and Representatives on environmental issues led to passage of many laws and favorable regulatory requirements.

She was pre-deceased by Webster Sandford, her husband of 41 years, her son, Joseph W Sandford and her daughter, Priscilla Sandford Survivors are her daughters and their husbands, Tracy and Marc Whitehead of Chicago, Lucinda and Charles Landreth of Philadelphia, Catherine and Harry Morgan of Glastonbury, Connecticut, Sarah Sandford and Joseph Miller of Tucson. Other immediate survivors are her daughter-in-law, Valerie Clough Sandford of Des Moines, Iowa, and son-in-law, Ben Wade of London, England, 7 granddaughters and 2 grandsons, 10 great-granddaughters, and her brother James J. Tracy (Judy) of Newport Beach, California. Barbara was called "Mommy Sandford" by many, many younger people in her life. The family is grateful for the loving and kind care provided to her by her numerous helpers in the Plainfield area.

A Service of Memories will be held on September 28, at 1:00 pm in Wolfeboro, NH, at the Sandford summer home.

On November 16, a memorial service will be held at 1:00 pm at Crescent Avenue Presbyterian Church, Plainfield, NJ. Memorials may be sent to The Plainfield Symphony, PO Box 5093, Plainfield, NJ 07061 or The Plainfield Garden Club, 640 E Broad Street, Westfield, NJ 07090

September 3, 2013 In Memory of Barbara Sandford

by Bernice Paglia

Word has come that Barbara Sandford, Plainfield's foremost advocate of beautification, has passed away at her New Hampshire home.

A Plainfield Garden Club member since 1950, Barbara shared her knowledge and talents with the community at large, not only advising officials on beautification but taking a hands-on role in doing the work. I first saw Barbara about 30 years ago, up on the embankment by the main train station, pulling weeds. Her patrician looks contrasted with a practicality and purpose that was an example for anybody who loved the city. She applied both charm and persuasiveness to getting what she needed from Public Works, whether it was watering plants with a tanker truck or helping with the heaviest work.

Barbara was one of the original members of the Shade Tree Commission and had much advice to give. She also shared memories of her anti-litter work, recalling parades where she dressed as "Auntie Litter" to advocate for a clean city.

She abhorred roadside billboards and became president of Scenic New Jersey to fight their proliferation. In 2000, she protested the removal of trees from the Blue Star Memorial Highway Drive to make way for development.

Barbara was a strong supporter of the electoral process and a longtime member of the League of Women Voters of Plainfield.

For all these efforts and more, she will be remembered by Plainfielders.

Her family has announced a memorial service to be held in Plainfield on Saturday, November 9th to celebrate her 95th birthday (November 14th). at 1 p.m. in Crescent Avenue Presbyterian Church, followed by a reception in the Guild Room.

September 3, 2013 Barbara Sandford Dies; Plainfield Loses Stalwart Friend

by Dan Damon

Plainfield has lost a devoted and stalwart friend in the passing of Barbara Sandford at her New Hampshire summer home on Labor Day.

Word came last night that Barbara passed peacefully after a glorious final summer at the Lake Wentworth home she loved.

I met her soon after moving to Plainfield in 1983 and felt immediately at home with her direct and no-nonsense approach to public issues – especially the sense of pride she expected Plainfielders to take in their community and its appearance.

Nor was she concerned with the appearance of the business district and City Hall only. She introduced me to the Shakespeare Garden (one of a few worldwide) and the work of the ladies of the Plainfield Garden Club, who have tended it on the public's behalf for more than three-quarters of a century.

She was also a devout person of faith who lived out her Presbyterian convictions in as firm and generous way as she did her civic activities. In fact, her civic activities were just another way of expressing her faithfulness.

But she did much more and much of it discreetly, without fanfare or publicity.

When I was working in real estate, I was surprised one day to receive a call from Barbara asking if I could drop by her house to discuss an urgent but unspecified matter.

Puzzled, I met with her to learn that she wanted me to help her secretly pay off the mortgage of someone who had been something of a handyperson once and was now in danger of losing their home.

Though the amount was substantial, it was not huge. Her main worry was in offending the pride of the family she wished to help. After some finagling, and with the help of a friendly lawyer, we put together a transaction which save the day. I never knew the name of the family being helped and Barbara was adamant that she did not want anyone to know how it all had come about.

I thought of it as the sort of good work that John Calvin at his best encouraged, worthy yet self-effacing, characteristic of her deep faith (and of that of my own Puritan forebears).

When I had the temerity to try and compare her care for Plainfield to that of Eleanor Roosevelt, another woman of culture and means who devoted her life to others, Barbara said sharply, 'Dan, don't you ever compare me to that buck-toothed woman!'.

Even so, I think she was secretly pleased to be compared to such a respected figure – even if she was the wife of a Democratic president, and Barbara was a staunch, lifelong Republican of a sort that is now dying out.

Barbara, we thank you for all you have done and for the inspiration you were to us all. We shall miss you, but you have set a standard for us to aspire to.


MEMORIAL SERVICE
for Barbara Sandford
Saturday, November 16, 2013
1:00 PM
Crescent Avenue Presbyterian Church

September 3, 2013 Barbara Tracy Sandford

September 3, 2013

Dear Friends and Neighbors,

This is to let you know that Mom has moved up to the family cemetery here in Wolfeboro, New Hampshire. She died on September 2, 2013 in her home on Lake Wentworth, snug in her bed, sleeping peacefully.

Mom had enjoyed a fantastic summer this year which included her Granddaughter Emily's marriage to David Aslanian on July 28th. This happy event brought together so many far-flung family members and friends that she was able to visit with her entire family. During the summer months, she helped get us ready for the wedding, rocked on the porch, snuggled with Great-Grandchildren and ate lots of corn (hot and leftover), lobster and green chocolate chip mint ice cream, her favorites. She napped a lot and then decided it was time to go, so she simply shut down.

On September 28th, at 1:00, we are planning a reception at her home in Wolfeboro for those friends who wish to visit and share memories. On Saturday, November 16th to celebrate her 95th birthday (November 14th), at 1:00 there will be a similar memorial service in Plainfield, New Jersey at Crescent Avenue Presbyterian Church, followed by a reception in the Guild Room. Out-of-town guests are invited to her home at 1275 Denmark Road again to visit and remember.

While sitting with Mom during this last week, we were talking about her hands and all the wondrous and magnificent things they have done. We thought it would be a fine thing to have a BTS Hand Book which will include your memories of her hands and what they did for you. Please take a moment to consider what you will write in the book at the memorials.

We hope that these notes and plans will give each of you an opportunity to say your goodbyes to Barbara Tracy Sandford. We look forward to visiting with you all.

The Sandfords

If you need to contact us, kindly email Sarah at ssmfanfan@gmail.com

September 4, 2013 Plainfield Symphony remembers Barbara

Plainfield Symphony mourns the recent death of Barbara Sandford, one of the Grand Dames of Plainfield, a long time musician and volunteer with Plainfield Symphony Society. Barbara volunteered for PSO for more than 50 years, beginning in 1940 as a violin player in the orchestra. She was an Honorary Co-Chair of PSO's 90th Anniversary Gala Reception in October 2009. PSO extends sympathy to the family and many friends of this very special woman. As a memorial, following are the biographical notes about Barbara that appeared in the event program for the Gala Reception in 2009.

Mrs. Webster Sandford (Barbara Sandford) has been a Plainfield resident for more than 50 years. Barbara plays the violin and joined PSO in 1940. She played with the PSO for many years, under conductors Louis Bostelmann and Samuel Carmell. In addition, Barbara joined the Plainfield Symphony Auxiliary when it was formed to help to sell tickets. She served as second President of the Auxiliary and remained involved for many years. Barbara was previously honored by PSO, when the Principal Second Chair was designated as the Barbara Sandford Chair.

Among her many other volunteer activities, Barbara is a lifetime member of the Junior League, which she joined at age 17. She served on the Landscape Committee of the Historical Society of Plainfield and as a member of the Plainfield Garden Club. She served as Chair of the City of Plainfield Beautification Committee for many years. In 1994, Barbara's home was the site of the PSO 75th Anniversary Supper.

Submitted by Mary Burgwinkle for the Plainfield Symphony Board

Plainfield anti-billboard activist Barbara Sandford dies at 94

September 6, 2013
PLAINFIELD – At times it almost seemed like she was fighting a lost cause, but Barbara Sandford never tired trying to teach others about the importance of maintaining public spaces and preserving the natural landscapes.

Sandford, a longtime fixture in this city's civic circles, died Monday at her family home in Wolfeboro, N.H. She was 94.

Sandford's family has scheduled a public memorial service for 1 p.m., Nov. 16, at Crescent Avenue Presbyterian Church. The service will celebrate her life and what would have been her 95th birthday, the family said.

Sandford was best known as an active member of the Plainfield Garden Club, which maintains the historic Shakespeare Garden in Cedar Brook Park, of the Landscape Committee of the Historical Society of Plainfield and of the Shade Tree Commission. She was a founding member of the city's beautification committee.

In the 1980s her passion for preserving natural and cultural heritage went national when she helped launch Scenic America, a nonprofit dedicated to fighting telecommunication towers and billboards, which she once described as "litter on a stick."

She presided over the group's New Jersey chapter in the 1990s and campaigned against the proliferation of billboards on Garden State highways. She also opposed a now-mothballed plan to run a four-lane highway through wetlands in South Brunswick.

"Inappropriate and unplanned development is happening all over New Jersey, eating up our rural areas at a mind-boggling pace," Sandford told the Courier News in 1999. "Transportation planning should encourage a less sprawling development pattern rather than helping to increase sprawl."

Sandford was a city resident for more than 50 years. Her husband, Webster, was a city councilman and school board member. He died in 1979.

She was a member of the Crescent Avenue Presbyterian Church in Plainfield member since 1942.

Sandford, active in the city's Republican Party, also contributed her time and talents to the Plainfield Symphony, which she joined in 1940 as a violin player. In a statement posted online this week, the nonprofit Plainfield Symphony described Sandford as "one of the Grand Dames of Plainfield."

Staff Writer Sergio Bichao: 908-243-6615; sbichao@njpressmedia.com

September 10, 2013 Anne Gates Announcement to the Garden Club of America Zone IV (NJ)

Dear Presidents & Zone Reps,

I heard from Robin Colman that Millicent Johnsen had died and from Tucker Trimble that Barbara Sandford had died. Both these special women gave so much to GCA, Zone IV, their garden clubs and their communities. I had the opportunity meet them both and have gotten to know them by the stories shared by their friends in Zone IV and Millicent's daughter Ingrid recently while at the Zone I Meeting.

Millicent Johnson served as GCA president from 1983-85 and remained completely devoted to GCA and to Zone IV in the years to follow. She was a familiar figure at GCA BOD meetings, Annual Meetings and many Zone IV events. She was a NJ Committee founding member also. Millicent was instrumental in garnering needed financial support for the Rome Prize in the 1980's. She was a member of the Rumson Garden Club.

Barbara Sandford was passionate about conservation, beautification and music but above all to her family. She was a founding member of Scenic New Jersey and worked to beautify Plainfield, her neighborhood. She was a member of the Plainfield Garden Club and a past Zone IV Director. Barbara also was awarded the GCA Zone Civic Improvement Award in 1985. If you look at Plainfield GC website, you see a wonderful tribute to Barbara.


We will miss them and do our best to continue their legacy.

Enjoy this beautiful day,
Anne Gates
GCA Zone IV Director

Millicent Mercer Johnsen

It's with the deepest regret and sympathy that I have to inform you of the passing of Ingrid Barrett's mother, Millicent Johnsen, on Sunday, September 8th.

She served as GCA president from 1983-85 and remained completely devoted to GCA and to Zone IV in the following years. She was a familiar figure at the GCA BOD meetings, Annual Meetings and many Zone IV events and was instrumental in garnering needed financial support for the Rome Prize in the 1980's. She was a member of the Rumson Garden Club.

2013-09-11 Star Ledger

A life remembered for bringing beauty to Plainfield and nation's highways

PLAINFIELD – She fought against billboards and for reproductive rights, advocated for hospitals and churches, taught Sunday school and played the violin.

But for the greater part of 94 years, Plainfield's Barbara Sandford preferred to get her hands dirty.

Whether weeding and watering in public gardens, advocating at city hall or raising six children, Mrs. Sandford had passions and interests, and passionate interest to spare. And she highlighted them all, her daughter, Cindy Landreth, said.

Mrs. Sandford, who resided in Plainfield, died at her summer home in Wolfeboro, N.H., on Sept. 2, a few weeks after hosting her extended family for a granddaughter's wedding.

"She lived a full life," Landreth said. "And maybe more importantly, she did important stuff with it."

Mrs. Sandford served as president of the Plainfield Garden Club, sat on the Plainfield Beautification Committee and was chair of the Plainfield Shade Tree Commission. She was recognized for her efforts with several honors and awards, including from the Garden Club of America.

A good part of Mrs. Sandford's legacy, though, is invisible – exactly as she wanted it.

In the late 1970s, Mrs. Sandford co-founded Scenic America, a Washington, D.C-based nonprofit, to organize and campaign against billboards – "litter on stick," she called them – on the nation's highways and byways.

The organization, of which there are now dozens of state and local affiliates, continues to affect the sort of change Mrs. Sanford envisioned across the country.

"If you were passionate about things, and she was passionate about a lot of things, you could make a difference," Landreth said. "She led by example, rather than by fiat."

After graduating from junior college in New London, Barbara Tracy set off for a Wyoming dude ranch, where she met Webster Sandford, a partner at the New York City law firm of White & Case. They married in 1938, settling in Plainfield.

Although Mrs. Sandford would tend to a wife's midcentury responsibilities, including raising six children, she began to cultivate a hybrid of interests, chief among them politics and gardening.

A registered Republican, she also was an ardent environmentalist and preservationist.

"She was fiscally conservative but socially liberal," said Landreth, who lives in Philadelphia. "She was more interested in getting something done than being labeled."

She would march on Washington to rally for women's right to birth control and play the violin with the Plainfield Symphony. And as the city succumbed to the strife that engulfed the nation's urban core during the late 1960s, she remained an enthusiastic promoter for Plainfield, steadfastly encouraging, for example, the planting of vegetable gardens in the city's vacant lots, particularly by schoolchildren.

"She really cared about Plainfield," Landreth said. "She held court there."

Webster Sandford, who was born and raised in Plainfield and served on the city school board and city council, died in 1979.

In addition to Landreth, Mrs. Sanford is survived by a brother, three daughters, nine grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren. A son, Joseph Sandford, died in 2005 and a daughter, Priscilla Sandford, in 2008.

A memorial service will be held at 1 p.m. on Nov. 16 at Crescent Avenue Presbyterian Church in Plainfield .

A grand dame of Plainfield, Barbara Sandford dies at 94

By Richard Khavkine/The Star-Ledger

2013-09-11 Star Ledger

Plainfield's Barbara Sandford considered billboards "Litter on stick." She co-founded Scenic America, a nonprofit organization that organizes and campaigns against billboards on the nation's highways and byways. Sandford, pictured in 1998 on Route 78 in Warren Township, died last week at her summer home in New Hampshire.
Tony Kurdzuk/The Star-Ledger

2013-09-11 Courier News

Obituary for Barbara Tracy Sandford

Barbara Tracy Sandford

AGE: 94 • Wolfeboro, NH

Barbara Tracy Sandford died on September 2, 2013 at her summer home of 75 years on Lake Wentworth, Wolfeboro, New Hampshire. She was 94. Her extended family of 37 was with her this summer attending the wedding of a grand-daughter. Barbara was the second daughter of Florence Comey and Jared Tracy of Cleveland, Ohio. She graduated from Hathaway Brown School and attended Colby Junior College (now Colby-Sawyer) in New London, NH. New London was the summer home of her grandmother, Jane Foote Tracy, also of Cleveland. In 1938, she married Webster Sandford, a partner at White & Case, NYC, and they resided in Plainfield, NJ, with their six children. Barbara raised her family with love, learning, and fun, as well as the responsibility to improve life for all. Barbara was passionate about many subjects: conservation, beautification, and the environment; music, both performing and listening; Planned Parenthood; politics; and her church. But most of all, she was passionate about her extended family. She was President of the Plainfield Garden Club (1960-62), and actively involved with its projects at Shakespeare Garden and Drake House Museum. The Garden Club established the Barbara Sandford Conservation Award in her honor. She received this award twice. In 1985 she was the Zone IV Chair. She received the Zone Civic Improvement Award from the Garden Club of America. Barbara also served as Chair of both the Plainfield Beautification Committee and the Plainfield Shade Tree Commission. Amidst the political turmoil in the 1960s, she led the effort to involve children in planting their own vegetable gardens (including nutrition, cooking, and preserving the vegetables) on vacant lots donated by the City of Plainfield. She marched in the Arbor Day Parade as "Aunty Litter" (anti-litter) with a garbage can on wheels and a broom. She was a leader in conservation and recycling which resulted in the establishment of the Recycling Transfer Station. An avid "hands-on" participant, she planted, watered, and weeded the public gardens throughout Plainfield. Other organizations claimed her skills and energy: Girl Scout Troop Leader of a "mounted (on horses)" troop in the late 1930s and Brownie and Girl Scout troops in the 1940s; Junior League of Plainfield; Muhlenberg Hospital Auxiliary; Planned Parenthood of Plainfield including marching in Washington for reproductive freedom; League of Women Voters; and Crescent Avenue Presbyterian Church as an Elder, Deacon, and Sunday School teacher. She was a member of the Shakespeare Society. She played the violin with the Plainfield Symphony which named the Principal Second Chair in her honor. Later in her life, she became a member of the Colonial Dames in New Jersey. In Wolfeboro, she was a Trustee of the Lake Wentworth Foundation and a Lifetime Member of the Lake Wentworth Association. She was passionate about preserving the water quality of the lake and participated in the NH Lakes Lay Fish Condition Program. She provided private space for the eagles, loons, and even snapping turtles to birth and care for their young. She was a life-long sailor and rowed her skiff each morning. She drove her 1931 Ford woodie, Oscar, dressed as a loon in the July 4 parade. These extensive volunteer activities led to leadership in environmental organizations on the state and national level. She was a founding director of Scenic America in 1982 and received the Stafford Award in 1999, the highest honor. She was a founder and served as President of the Roadside Council of NJ. She was a director of the Garden Club of America and in 1972 was awarded the Medal of Merit. She worked endlessly to save the Great Swamp Watershed Area, the Revolutionary War Trenches in the Watchung Mountains, NJ, Blue Star Memorial Highways and the NJ Pine Barrens. Her frequent train trips to Washington, DC, to lobby Senators and Representatives on environmental issues led to passage of many laws and favorable regulatory requirements.

She was pre-deceased by Webster Sandford, her husband of 41 years, her son, Joseph W Sandford and her daughter, Priscilla Sandford Survivors are her daughters and their husbands, Tracy and Marc Whitehead of Chicago, Lucinda and Charles Landreth of Philadelphia, Catherine and Harry Morgan of Glastonbury, Connecticut, Sarah Sandford and Joseph Miller of Tucson. Other immediate survivors are her daughter-in-law, Valerie Clough Sandford of Des Moines, Iowa, and son-in-law, Ben Wade of London, England, 7 granddaughters and 2 grandsons, 10 great-granddaughters, and her brother James J. Tracy (Judy) of Newport Beach, California. Barbara was called "Mommy Sandford" by many, many younger people in her life. The family is grateful for the loving and kind care provided to her by her numerous helpers in the Plainfield area.

A Service of Memories will be held on September 28, at 1:00 pm in Wolfeboro, NH, at the Sandford summer home. On November 16, a memorial service will be held at 1:00 pm at Crescent Avenue Presbyterian Church, Plainfield, NJ. Memorials may be sent to The Plainfield Symphony, PO Box 5093, Plainfield, NJ 07061 or The Plainfield Garden Club, 640 E Broad Street, Westfield, NJ 07090. If you wish to express condolences or leave a fond memory, please visit www.lordfuner alhome.com.
- See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/mycentraljersey/obituary.aspx?n=barbara-tracy-sandford&pid=166898592#fbLoggedOut

September 2013 Scenic Overlook

Barbara Sandford, a founder of Scenic America, dies at 94

Barbara Sandford, one of the founders of Scenic America, died on September 2 at the age of 94 at her summer home in Wolfeboro, New Hampshire.

Mrs. Sandford was a longtime resident of Plainfield, New Jersey, where she was actively involved in civic life. She served as president of the Plainfield Garden Club, sat on the Plainfield Beautification Committee and was chair of the Plainfield Shade Tree Commission.

She wanted to protect roadsides from billboard blight, or "litter on a stick," as she called it. She formed Scenic America with others who wanted to create a voice for the average citizen in Washington, where the billboard lobby exerts tremendous pressure on lawmakers.

"We owe a debt of gratitude to Barbara Sandford for her passion and commitment to scenic beauty," said Mary Tracy, president of Scenic America. "We will continue to honor her legacy by working to make America a more beautiful place for the generations to come."

Contact us:
Scenic America
1307 New Hampshire Avenue NW
Washington, DC 20036
phone: 202.463.1294
email: scenic@scenic.org
web: www.scenic.org

September 19, 2013 Letter of Condolence from the Garden Club Of Princeton

Click here to read

February 2013 Garden Club of America Bulletin

Page 14

25 recognition of the founding members of the New Jersey Committee: Sally Booth, Barbara Sandford and Joan Vivian

Sandford, Barbara Tracy '50, President 1960 - 1962

1275 Denmark Road
Plainfield, NJ 07060
(908) 756-3546
(908) 756-1937 Fax
btsandford@aol.com

Husband: Webster

August 31, 2013 in the Shakespeare Garden

Brenda Anderson told the group assembled that during the week she spoke to Friends of Sleepy Hollow President, Pat Turner Kavanaugh as she had been visiting Barbara in New Hampshire.

Brenda had forwarded the following article we did on the Blue Star Highway to Pat. In turn, Pat was then able to read it to Barbara who reportedly was happy to learn of it.

August 26, 2013 Blue Star Highway

2013-07-08 Email in response to the email sent from the club regarding Mrs. Acomb's 1967 Art Exhibit at Swain's

Susan: I forwarded this to Cindy Sandford Landreth. Although Barbara Sandford receives your emails, she may not open email often. There is an Acomb portrait of Barbara at 1275 Denmark Road. Also, Wardlaw-Hartridge has one in the Oakwood Room of the last Hartridge head Betsy Cayer, which was commissioned by the board when Henry Foster was on the board.

Pat Turner Kavanaugh

July 2, 2013 GCA Zone IV Board of Associates

July 2, 2013

Dear Zone IV Club Presidents 2013-2014,

The 2013-2014 is officially underway and we welcome our 5 new Zone IV Club Presidents: Harriet Tanner, GC of Englewood; Jan Baker, GC of Madison; Susan Van Tassel, Short Hills Garden Club; Grania Allport, GC of Somerset Hills; and Linda Gecha, Stony Brook GC.

Welcome back to returning Presidents Debra Chambliss, GC of Morristown; Suzanne Guariglia, GC of the Oranges; Susan Fraser and Gail Sloan, co-presidents of Plainfield GC; Barb Morrison, GC of Princeton; Chris Hetzler, Rumson GC; Marite' Robinson, Summit GC; and Janet Laughlin, GC of Trenton.

Important dates:
The Zone IV Presidents' Council, Sept 18, 2013.
The New Jersey Committee, Oct 3, 2013. Info and registration posted on the Zone IV webpage. The Zone IV Representatives Meeting, Oct 24,2013 at Frelinghuysen. Info to follow from Anne Gates, Zone IV Director. The Zone IV Meeting, June 17-18, 2014 at The Knickerbocker Country Club, in Tenafly, NJ.

The Zone IV Webpage is up and running on the GCA Website (Members Only/ National Organization/ Zones/ Zone IV). Let me know about any club activity you would like to post and please send photos! This website is for your clubs to share information.

You and your club members are the essence of Garden Club of America. Do not hesitate to reach out to each other and to us. It is in the spirit of camaraderie, the love of gardening, the benefits of educational conferences, and the quest for conservation and civic improvement that we gather and work together. We look forward to sharing these activities and goals with you this year.

Stay tuned and keep posted for detailed information on all of the above. Have a fun-filled, happy, and safe summer. See you in September.

Best regards,
Annie

Anne Bigliani
Zone IV Chairman, annibigliani@gmail.com

NOTE: Please check out the link to the GCA website Zone IV page. Tucker (Zone IV Nominating Rep, Member Board of Associates, Floral Design Judge Judging Program), Kathy (Member Board of Associates), Diana (Member Board of Associates), Barbara (Member Board of Associates) and Mary (Horticulture Judge Judging Program) are featured along with other "Who's Who" in Zone IV!

May 1, 2013 Centennial Meeting of the Garden Club of America

The Star of Zone IV: Barbara Sandford

Annie Bigliani the GCA Zone IV Chairman, reports to the 650 assembled GCA club members on the very active Zone IV.

Back in November 2012, Annie came to visit the PGC and we happened to celebrate Barbara's birthday that day. Annie, like everyone else, was in awe of Barbara and immediately asked if we could supply her with some photos so she could feature Barbara at this special meeting.

May 1, 2013 Auntie Litter

Annie explained that the photo on the left was Barbara dressed as "Auntie Litter" and that, of course, got a chuckle out of the crowd.

Tree in Front of City Hall

May 16, 2013

Best Thing to Happen to City Hall – Tim Kirby! Congratulations, Tim! Read here.

November 15, 2010, Dan Damon wrote about another City Hall planting:

The pine on the lawn of City Hall that is the focus of the annual holiday tree-lighting festivities was originally given in memory of Barbara's late husband, Webster Sandford. It was replaced a few years ago with another tree that Barbara and Public Works Superintendent John Louise selected, which is happily beginning to really fill out.

April 24, 2013

Photo by Jeanne Turner

Jeanne visited Barbara today to show her the recovered slide imagas for the 1965 50th Anniversary Party.

April 24, 2013 Barbara Sanford holds a photo of herself as Auntie Litter

Photo by Ted Turner

Jeanne Turner and Barbara Sandford

Look at photos on an iPad.
Photo by Ted Turner

March 19, 2013 Crescent-Times Blogspot

http://crescent-times.blogspot.com

Union County Cultural Affairs

Subject: RE: NJ Women's Heritage Trail
From: "Barbara Fuller" <bfuller@ucnj.org>
Date: Wed, March 21, 2012 11:25 am
To: "Info" <info@plainfieldgardenclub.org>

Susan,

Thank you for sending the link to the Garden Club's website. It gives such a wonderful example of collaboration without planning! Please give my best wishes to Barbara Sanford, a friend of many years. She's a lovely lady who never stops giving back to the community – a true treasure.

Barbara
Barbara Fuller, Administrator
Union County Office of Cultural and Heritage Affairs
633 Pearl Street
Elizabeth, NJ 07202
908-558-2550

––Original Message––
From: Info [mailto:info@plainfieldgardenclub.org]
Sent: Wednesday, March 21, 2012 8:21 AM
To: Barbara Fuller
Subject: Re: NJ Women's Heritage Trail

Dear Barbara,

Thank you so much for the email below. We did receive our sign yesterday for the garden. You can view the events on the front page of www.plainfieldgardenclub.org

You may note the elderly lady, Mrs. Barbara Sandford. A former president of the Plainfield Garden Club, she has been a member since 1950! She is a real force, having contributed greatly to many civic endeavors both in Plainfield and around the state.

Thank you again for your support –

Susan Fraser
Communications Chair

Plainfield Garden Club Members,

The first attachment is a recent press release to announce the opening of an exhibit based on the publication, New Jersey Women's Historic Trail published by the New Jersey Office of Historic Preservation. The agency gave permission to the Office of Cultural and Heritage Affairs to enlarge and reprint the pages that feature the sites located in Union County. I saw the news article about the Shakespeare Garden in the Star Ledger and want to make sure you know about the exhibit which is on display until April 13th. The additional three attachments are photos of the exhibit in the Administration Building in Elizabeth.

Congratulations on your vigilant work to maintain and preserve the wonderful garden. You're welcome to borrow the exhibit in the future if that would ever fit your plans.

Barbara Fuller
Barbara Fuller, Administrator
Union County Office of Cultural and Heritage Affairs
633 Pearl Street
Elizabeth, NJ 07202
908-558-2550

November 14, 2012

Plainfield Garden Club Celebrates Barbara Sandford's 94th Birthday

November 14, 2012

Gail Sloan, GCA Zone IV Chairman Annie Bigliani, Tracy Sandford Whitehead and Barbara Tracy Sandford

November 14, 2012

Tracy Sandford Whitehead, Barbara Tracy Sandford and Jeanne Turner

November 14, 2012

November 14, 2012

443 Stelle Avenue

Tracy Sandford Whitehead, daughter of Barbara Tracy Sandford, said on November 14, 2012 that 443 Stelle Avenue was the address of her grandfather, Joseph Sandford. The address now indicates the carriage house or gatehouse that has been converted to a home. It was believed that this gatehouse served the large home fronting Central Avenue. However, Tracy said that this gatehouse was the one to her grandfather's home on Stelle. She even has a photo of the family on a carriage going through the arch.

http://plainfieldtrees.blogspot.com/2007_12_01_archive.html

There is a massive and beautiful tulip tree at 443 Stelle Avenue near the corner of Field.

November 14, 2012

Photo by Diana Madsen

November 14, 2012

A toast to Barbara

Annie Bigliani, Tracy Sandford Whitehead, Barbara Tracy Sandford

Photo by Diana Madsen

November 14, 2012

Garden Club co-Presidents Gail Sloan and Susan Fraser with Barbara Sandford, President 1960 - 1962

Photo by Diana Madsen

November 14, 2012

Gail Sloan, Barbara Sandford, Susan Fraser

Photo by Diana Madsen

November 14, 2012

Gail Sloan, Barbara Sandford, Susan Fraser

Photo by Diana Madsen

November 14, 2012

Brenda Anderson and Barbara Sandford

Photo by Diana Madsen

November 15, 2012 Correspondence from Tracy Sandford Whitehead

Whitehead4@aol.com
9:25 PM (12 hours ago)

to me, btsandford, abigliani, jctsl300, tedturnerjr
Mom and I have had the best time looking at all the photos and reading all the information on the fantastic web site. We looked at Olmsted's list of plant materials for the Shakespeare Garden and talked about her grandmother's garden at the Tracy Memorial Library (New London, NH) for which she hired Olmsted for the design. We loved looking at the old pictures of older, and now gone, members. Susan, Jeannie was correct. You do have an amazing memory. I've sent the log-on info to my sisters and Cindy said she loved going on line to read and see everything. So, to all of you, thank you so much for all that you do and for inviting us in to share it. And a double thanks for the lovely luncheon, gigantic cup cake, and floating dahlia. A very classy was to spend mom's birthday!

One correction: mom's grandfather and father were both James Jared Tracy (senior and junior and there is now a III and a IV)

Tracy S Whitehead
305 W Fullerton Parkway
Chicago IL 60614
773-348-8394
773-919-8394 cell

Tracy Memorial Library

304 Main Street ~ New London, NH 03257 ~ (603) 526-4656 ~ info@tracylibrary.org
www.tracylibrary.org

Library History
New London's first library was established in 1801 in the home of Josiah Brown, as a private lending library comprised of 100 volumes. The first Town Library was founded in 1897. It was housed in the Grange Hall with an operating budget of $100 annually. In 1907, the library moved to the newly built Colby Hill School, currently the site of the town parking lot.

The Library's current building was erected in 1823 as the home, saddle, and harness shop of Capt. Jonathan Everett. It later became the Morgan family home in 1854. In 1918, while owned by Jane A. Tracy, the building functioned as the original site of New London Hospital. When New London Hospital changed locations in 1923, Mrs. Tracy, with architect Sidney Strickland, converted the building into a new Town Library. In 1926, the library opened.

In 1970, the need for additional space drove the conversion of an auditorium built into a stack area. At the same time, the Reading Room was refurbished and the New Hampshire room was created.

A Building Committee was formed in 1988 to develop a proposal for a $1.3 million dollar renovation and addition. Funds were raised through a Capital Campaign and a bond issue. In 1990, the building was renovated to conform to building codes and double the existing space while maintaining the character and history of the original building.

Tracy Memorial Library became fully automated in 1996. Public computers and wireless access were later added. In 2007, the roof was remodeled, the HVAC was updated, and age related issues were repaired to preserve and maintain the Tracy Memorial Library for future generations.

Tracy Memorial Library Garden

The garden has heritage plantings from the original designers of the library Olmsted Brothers Landscape Architects, Brookline Massachusetts who also designed Central Park in New York City

Tracy Memorial Library Garden

Encyclopedia of Cleveland History

http://ech.case.edu/ech-cgi/article.pl?id=TJJJ

TRACY, JAMES JARED, JR. - The Encyclopedia of Cleveland History
TRACY, JAMES JARED, JR. (27 Feb. 1884-16 May 1950), machine designer and manufacturer, held at least 28 U.S. patents, for engines, hat production machinery, and carburetors and other accessories for the AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY, among other inventions. Born in Cleveland to JANE ALLYN FOOTE TRACY† and JAMES JARED TRACY, SR.†, Tracy attended Rockwell public school and summered with his family in New London, NH. After graduating from UNIVERSITY SCHOOL (1903) and Harvard University (B.A. 1907), he worked for WHITE MOTOR CORP.RATION before entering the field of machine design full-time. He did postgraduate study in mechanical engineering at Harvard. After 1923, Tracy also managed his father's extensive real estate holdings. In this capacity he presided over the Apartment House and Home Owners Association. He also served as director of the F. H. Hill Company (later the Hill Casket Company) and trustee of the Euclid Avenue Association.

On 8 June 1912 Tracy married FLORENCE COMEY TRACY† of Cleveland. The couple lived in SHAKER HEIGHTS with son James J. and daughters Barbara (Mrs. Webster) Sandford, Clara (Mrs. David R.) Upson, and Ann (Mrs. Frank) Carvell. Active in civic affairs, Tracy was a life member of the FAMILY SERVICE ASSN. OF CLEVELAND, a trustee of UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS CASE MEDICAL CENTER, and once, a member of the Chamber of Commerce of EAST CLEVELAND. A Republican and a Presbyterian, he belonged to the CHURCH OF THE COVENANT and the Mayflower and New England societies. Tracy is buried in LAKE VIEW CEMETERY.

Last Modified: 22 Jul 1997 03:54:55 PM


TRACY, FLORENCE COMEY - The Encyclopedia of Cleveland History
TRACY, FLORENCE COMEY (20 Dec. 1886-13 June 1974), welfare volunteer, received a citation from the Friends of UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS CASE MEDICAL CENTER for her voluntary service. Born to Nancy Gill and George Preston Comey of Cleveland, Tracy graduated from HATHAWAY BROWN and attended the CLEVELAND INSTITUTE OF ART. Tracy concentrated her volunteer activities in health and welfare (see WELFARE/RELIEF). She served on the board of MacDonald House of University Hospitals, as a director of the CLEVELAND SOCIETY FOR THE BLIND, and was a life member of the FAMILY SERVICE ASSN. OF CLEVELAND. Tracy was an early member of the JUNIOR LEAGUE OF CLEVELAND, INC. An avid gardener, she served as treasurer of the Garden Center of Greater Cleveland (see CLEVELAND BOTANICAL GARDEN) and was active in other local gardening associations.

On 8 June 1912 Tracy married JAMES JARED TRACY, JR.† The couple lived in SHAKER HEIGHTS with son James J. and daughters Barbara (Mrs. Webster) Sandford, Clara (Mrs. David R.) Upson, and Ann (Mrs. Frank) Carvell. Tracy is buried in LAKE VIEW CEMETERY.

Last Modified: 22 Jul 1997 03:53:35 PM

Non Log-In to the new GCA Website August 27, 2012

March 20, 2012

Roger Clark representing the State of New Jersey presents the Ladies of the Garden Club a sign for the New Jersey Women's Heritage Trail.

From left to right:

Jeanne Turner, Mary Kent, Donny from Union County Parks Department, Sally Booth, Phyllis Alexander, Roger Clark, Lauren Shepard, Gail Sloan, Mandy Zachariades and Barbara Sandford.

March 20, 2012

March 20, 2012

March 20, 2012

March 20, 2012

Barbara reminisced about her years in the garden club. She said she was happy being a junior member but was not happy when "they" made her move to Active member in 1954 as she was busy raising her children.

She clearly remembered the skit performed by Meechy Loosli and Hazel Lockwood for the 1970 Zone IV Meeting. She said it was very funny. She said Hazel, Meechy and Jack Roome were all entertainers. They always put on skits, especially at the Monday Afternoon Club.

Barbara spoke about her trip to Japan as our delegate. She said that was her fondest memory of being part of the club, although she paid for the trip herself.

Barbara also spoke about the demise of the famous Iris Garden and said it was two members in particular that did it in – although she would not name them.

When Etheledreda Anderegg was mentioned, she exclaimed that she had not thought her in years, but alas, we were interrupted and our walk down memory lane ceased.

Email from Elisabeth Loizeaux to Susan Fraser February 12, 2011

Dear Susan,

Yes, I remember the postcard well. I believe it was a State wide project for GCA clubs to acquaint people with native plants (it could even have been a Nation wide project). I am sorry, but I can't recall what year it was undertaken . I would suggest you ask Barbara Sandford about Gerri Acomb. If I remember correctly, she grew up in Northern India and was a painter of botanical subjects, quite well known. I now wonder if PGC ever owned the original painting of the clematis? I remember endless trips to the printer, and I was never really happy with the colors .We all had to buy a certain number of cards and then sell them to our friends and acquaintances. If the date is really important, maybe GCA has records, I recall going to a meeting (maybe a Zone meeting) and seeing a large collection of other cards.

But do ask Barbara about Ms Acomb, she was an unusual person. In fact, please let me know what you find out. There are so many interesting stories about "old Plainfield" people, how they were related, how they intermarried etc. ––- I could not believe my eyes when I saw Beverley Reid's letter of resignation. She must have been really disappointed in us younger members. She was MRS Gardenclub, a super talented horticulturist and arranger, trained by the previous super GC members: The two sisters Mrs. Frost and Mrs. de Hart, Marge Elliot, Mrs. Ladd (who went to flower shows with her maid in attendance who had to hand her tools and flowers at her command, the way a nurse hands surgical instruments to the surgeon!)

Best regards,

Elisabeth

Correspondence with Elisabeth Loizeaux

Thank you for the info on Marge Elliott. Come spring, we are planning to drive around and see what is left of some of these notable homes and gardens. Lois Poinier is still alive and "sharp as a tack" according to Cathy McGraw of the Short Hills Garden Club. She is living in Mystic, CT. Hopefully she will be able to provide some of the descriptions we need on her gardens. The plots thickens as they say!


On Tue, Jan 25, 2011 at 2:47 PM, Elisabeth Loizeaux <ekloizeaux@comcast.net> wrote:

Very interesting about Lois Poinier (I misspelled her name in previous mail) She, by the way, also did our own landscaping many years back. Yes, of course I would be able to identify other pictures of Driftway Farm, after all, my husband Peter was born there and we were next door neighbors all our married life in NJ.

I do not know the Sanders property at all, but am very familiar with Marge Elliot's (Mrs. William) on Black Birch Road in Scotch Plains. When Charles Detweiler moved her historic house from behind what is now Union County Tech. to its present location, we bought old beams belonging to a barn of that house and had them installed in our house, which was also designed by Charles Detweiler. We were quite involved with the Elliot project –– I wonder how much of her unique :farm" garden is still intact. Lois Poinier and Marge did a fantastic landscaping job, I am glad there are pictures. We had many GC meetings at Mrs. Elliot's house. Barbara Sandford will know all the details, she was a close friend of Marge's. I can't remember the number on Black Birch Road, but it is the only historic house in the development, in fact it has a marker, it's on the left hand side as you drive up Black Birch.

As far as "old Plainfield" family relationships and connections are concerned, Sally Booth, having grown up in Plainfield, would probably also be knowledgeable. Other than that Barbara Peek and Jane Burner also grew up in Plainfield. Consider me the expert on Loizeaux and Fosters.......

Elisabeth

Correspondence with Elisabeth Loizeaux

Thank you Elisabeth! Not to worry. There is no such thing as too much information in my book. We will paraphrase and include it with the packet to complete the submission to the Smithsonian. As a matter of fact, we intend to bring some pictures to Barbara to help us identify people and places. She is a wealth of information and has an amazing memory. I know there are active and affiliate members who would love to hear you are doing so well and enjoying your New England living. Can I share your note on our website? I for one think of you fondly every time I use the urn. I get such enjoyment from it! And I did not know that Bernice and your husband are cousins! How are they related? Along with gathering information about the homes and gardens of the Plainfield Garden Club we are collecting anecdotes and relationships and documenting them in notable members' albums. I hope you are able to access our website. We have heard from a number of affiliates and sustaining members that it keeps them up to date with the comings and goings of the club between emails. If not, I would be happy to talk you through it. Thank you again and heed your mayor's warnings! I am. Sincerely, Darlene


On Sun, Jan 23, 2011 at 5:37 PM, Elisabeth Loizeaux <ekloizeaux@comcast.net> wrote:

Hello Darlene –– not to worry about spelling Loizeaux with an "s", it shows that you paid attention in French class. It would be "un oiseu - or les oiseaux, I have no idea how it ended up Loizeaux. –- If it's cold in NJ, our temps in Boston are to go down to 4 degrees tonight, so cold that our dear mayor Menino is sending out e-mails to us "elderly" folks to stay home!

Please find attached my comments to the picture you sent. I'm sure it's much more detailed than what you wanted. I can only think of one person in the club who could corroborate my descriptions, that would be Barbara Sandford, and possibly Bernice Swain, who is my husband's cousin. They both were at Driftway Farm.

Best regards to all,

Elisabeth

February 17, 2011 Honorary Member Status Bestowed to Barbara Sandford

Barbara Sanford
1275 Denmark Road
Plainfield, New Jersey 07060

February 17, 2011

Dear Barbara,
Since joining our organization in 1954 you have contributed so much and truly enriched the fabric of our club. You have served as president and have headed and served on numerous committees within the club. You have received many awards, including The Medal of Merit in 1972 and the Civic Improvement Award in 1985.
Barbara, you have contributed greatly to many conservation efforts, most notably Scenic New Jersey and have championed numerous beautification projects throughout Plainfield. You are held in high regard by many members both past and present.
In recognition of all you have done, the Plainfield Garden Club is proud to inform you that you have been awarded the membership status of Honorary Member. Barbara, you are an invaluable member and we have been blessed because you have shared with us your wisdom and experience. Congratulations on this achievement!

Respectively yours,


Marty Dyke
Corresponding Secretary
Plainfield Garden Club

Email from Corresponding Secretary Marty Dyke to Susan Fraser

February 26, 2011

Last evening around 6:30 pm I got a call from Barbara Sandford thanking me profusely for the lovely letter. She couldn't wait to show her children,she said!! You were right...she was thrilled. She said she was going to write a note to Mandy!.... so cute.

Correspondence from Elva Busch: Scenic America

No need to print one out for Barbara. We consulted with her on the Scenic America article this time, so I've printed out a copy for her and have it ready to mail today!
Thanks again for everything.
Elva

On Feb 11, 2011, at 6:20 AM, skf729@aol.com wrote:

Hi Elva!

Thanks for the encouragement. I often think of you as my only fan!!

Con Watch is great and timely for us as Cindy Zipf from Ocean Action is our March speaker. I liked your article on fish – I think I will continue my fish oil pills and maybe avoid some of the danger. I also liked the Scenic America article - - I wonder if the president, Mary Tracy, is related to our Scenic America doyenne, Barbara Tracy Sandford? I will have to ask Barbara (and print out Con Watch to give it to her) We celebrated her 92nd birthday in December. She remains a marvel. There is a horrible LED sign in Kenilworth on the GSP and I really wish we had someone in NJ to make the motel (!) take it down!

I linked Con Watch for our members and included the instructions on how to get it at GCA headquarters. It is a lot of "homework" for the ladies, but our meetings are so much better as everyone comes informed and prepared – not so repetitive all the time. I am still advocating for the other 9 NJ clubs to get to work on a website. I think they would enjoy the big assist it gives the club.

Thanks again – truly, your words mean a lot after hours of scanning and sorting through the archives! xo S

––Original Message––
From: Elva Busch <elvabusch@comcast.net>
To: Fraser Susan <SKF729@aol.com>
Sent: Thu, Feb 10, 2011 11:17 pm
Subject: PGC Website

Dear Susan,
I continually am amazed at all I find on the website. It is endless - and I know much of that effort is because of your diligence. I was just enjoying reading the section on dear Betty Hackman. You keep everyone so well informed about EVERYTHING! It is truly amazing.
I am attaching the latest copy of ConWatch which has been online now for a couple of weeks. Issues of it can now be accessed from both the homepage and also from the traditional Members Login, as in the past.
That way, we can pass along issues to our contacts - friends, family, colleagues, etc. without them having to go on to "Members Only."
I've worked for the past three years to get this accessible to the world, so I am delighted. For the public access, here is how to do it:

Go to the GCA website. Click on "What We Do" on the Homepage. You will then see a category called "Publications" on the pull-down. Select this and you will find the very first one is Conservation Watch. When you click on that, you will find of listing of past issues, with the most recent, Winter '10 -11 first.

Thanks again, Susan, for all you do for the members of the club. I'll attach a file of the issue here as well.

With all best regards to everyone there!
Elva

P.S. Who is going to Washington from the club this month?
I'll hope to see some familiar faces.

Winter 2011 Con Watch

Letter to the website

Subject: Re: The Harman Family
From: "Margaret Lane" <lmargaret1@yahoo.com>
Date: Fri, March 25, 2011 10:13 am
To: "Info" <info@plainfieldgardenclub.org>

Dear Susan,

How nice of you to answer my e-mail, thank you. Our garden club "King Haiglar" founded in 1949 is one of 3 left in Camden, a city of about 7000, there were once 5or 6. mostly from "DuPont" neighborhoods.

Some of our ladies took pictures that day and I will send them to you.
The cottage sits behind a tall hedge which is why there wasn't a better photo. The camellias were in full bloom then and about finished now. as Spring has come at last. The azalea's and dogwoods are blooming now. As to the question do I remember Barbara Sandford YES I lived around the corner on Lorraine Ave. and along with Susie Fickett Amy Neal and others played with her daughter Tracy,who. married another member of our class Ned Harold. Please say "hello" to her and tell Mrs. Sandford I have asked her niece Barbara Wells Edwards about her when home for reunions.

By the way we all loved what we called a "Secret Garden" in the back of the Sandford home even had a "Mock Wedding" there as children.

Cedar Brook park is locked in our memories are the Iris gardens still there? While home last August Elizabeth Marder and I went to the Library and spent a morning in the archives looking up all the old homes we could remember. [we had driven and walked through our old neighborhoods etc. Liz still lives on Inwood Place] We grew up in a special place. I look forward to following your web site as you continue to document the Plainfield area we remember, also I did go to the web sites you gave me. Thank you.

Sincerely,

Margaret Lane

PS. please let me know where I can send the photos.

July 12, 2011

A letter from Virginia Rushmore responding to a letter from Corresponding Secretary Marty Dyke offering congratulations on 40 years of membership in the PGC.

Dear Marty,

What a lovely note from you. I certainly appreciate you writing to me with this information. It is a long time!!

Plainfield Garden Club has done a lot for me. I'll never forget the workshop in Barbara Sandford's basement. I found that I had a feeling for arranging flowers!!

My very best wished to you and the members of The Plainfield Garden Club –

Sincerely,

Virginia Rushmore

P.S. I hurt my right elbow – writing is not so good.

ConWatch Fall 2011

Marion Fuller Brown, 1917 – 2011
In Memoriam
Ann Coburn, Village Garden Club of Sewickley (PA) – Zone V
Chair, GCA Conservation 1993-95, GCA National Affairs, 1995-97

Marion Thompson Fuller Brown died on June 3rd at her beloved home in Maine, Ram's Head Farm. She was a dynamic and unforgettable figure who worked tirelessly on conservation issues. A member of the Piscataqua Garden Club from 1948 until her death, she served three terms in the Maine state legislature from 1966 to 1972. She was perhaps best known nationally for sponsoring legislation in her home state of Maine banning "off premises" billboards. In 1982 she helped to form the National Coalition to Preserve Scenic Beauty, now known as Scenic America. Open lands surrounding her home were put under conservation easements, and an unspoiled half mile of York River
shoreline was similarly designated.

During her work with the Garden Club of America, she was Director of Zone 1, 1981-1983, and a member of the GCA Executive Committee, 1986-88. She served for many years on the GCA Conservation and National Affairs and Legislation Committees, where I was privileged to know her, to work with her and to benefit from her experience, her drive, and her keen insights into the politics of conservation. She
received a major award from the GCA in 1980, the Amy Angell Collier Montague Medal for outstanding civic achievement. She was one of those perceiving the need in the early 1970's for national advocacy by the GCA to strengthen its influence on environmental policies. The National Affairs and Legislation Committee of GCA was founded
subsequently by a small group of dedicated women, of which she was one. She served as a member or advisor to that committee throughout the 1980's and 1990's. Her friends in Zone I established the Marion Fuller Brown Award, to be given at any full zone meeting to an outstanding conservation exhibit.

In addition to her work promoting scenic beauty, she was the prime sponsor of Maine's returnable bottle law and was a major supporter of Maine's Clean Water and Clean Air Conservation Watch Fall 2011
4 Act. In 1971 President Nixon appointed her to the National Highway Beautification Commission, where she served for four years. She was active in land preservation locally and was a member of the York Planning Board for many years.

Marion was a tireless advocate for environmental advocacy on many fronts, stressing always the importance of clean water and clean air to human health as well as its economic value. She was a joy and delight to work with. Her knowledge and enthusiasm over her long career were invaluable in the GCA's work to preserve environmental values. She will be greatly missed.

December 14, 2011

Elaine Welsh and Barbara Sandford

Background: Janet Burchett

December 14, 2011

Barbara Sandford and Jeanne Turner

December 14, 2011

Barbara Sandford, Jeanne Turner, Lorraine Ciemniecki, Pam O'Toole and Elaine Welsh

December 14, 2011

Barbara Sandford

December 14, 2011

Barbara Sandford, Lorraine Ciemniecki and Bernadette Neill

December 14, 2011

Barbara Sandford

June 1, 2011 Mandy's Poem to the Membership

"Barbara, dear Barbara,
you are the matron of the club.
We love our Aunty Litter
and we do so enjoy your stories.
We never pass a billboard without giving it the evil eye.
We shake our fists at them and cry
'Your Days Are Numbered
You Unsightly Blemish!"

A Fascinator!

Inspired by the recent head gear at the Royal Wedding, Barbara Sandford puts on her "fascinator" which had feathers and a bouncy butterfly. Jeanne Turner watches.

Photo by S. Fraser

Jeanne and Barbara

Barbara spoke to the group, thanking the club for making her an Honorary Member. She reminsced about when the club sent her to Japan and how she was entertained by the Emperor in his garden "with red rugs everywhere." She concluded by saying "the garden club has meant more to me in my life outside of my family."

Photo by S. Fraser

Passing Around the Clipboard

In the background (left to right) Jeanne Turner, Barbara Sanford, (sitting low) Mandy Zachariades), Ramona Ferguson (in chair), Lorraine Ciemniecki (facing away), Bernadette Neill, (far right), Sally Booth in pink and the back of Diana Madsen's resplendent hat!

Photo by S. Fraser

Sharing a Word

Ginny Dughi leans in to Diana Madsen

In the background, Phyllis Alexander, Marty Dyke, Mary Kent, Tucker Trimble, Jeanne Turner and Barbara Sanford

On the Shaded Lawn

Jeanne Turner, Barbara Sandford and Mandy Zachariades who quipped "I sit at the feet of Barbara!"

Photo by S. Fraser

Chatting Away

Babara Sandford, Mandy Zachariades, Lauren Shepard, Ramona Ferguson, Lorraine Ciemniecki, and Bernadette Neill

Photo by S. Fraser

Garden Club Ladies

Tucker Trimble, Elaine Welsh, Jeanne Turner and Barbara Sandford

Photo by S. Fraser

Poetry in the Garden

How approbriate!

Elaine Welsh, Jeanne Turner, Barbara Sandford, Lauren Shepard, our poet Mandy Zachariades, Lorraine Ciemniecki and Sally Booth

Photo by S. Fraser

Bernice Paglia's Blog: Shakespare in Bloom June 11

Sunday June 5

Last Wednesday I took a walk to the Shakespeare Garden in Cedar Brook Park and found the ladies of the Plainfield Garden Club deep into a business meeting in this perfect setting. For this annual outdoor gathering, the ladies wear flower-decked hats and enjoy lunch al fresco.

text and photo by Bernice Paglia

November 17, 2010

We celebrated the birthday of our illustrious and long-standing member Barbara Sandford with cake and song.

June 2011 Jeanne Turner & Barbara Sandford

Shakespeare Garden, Plainfield

Barbara in a "fascinator" provided by her daughter

June 11, 2010

Bernice Swain and Barbara Sandford arrive for the final meeting of the year and celebration luncheon.

June 11, 2010 Bernice Swain, Ginny Dughi and Barbara Sandford

Photo by Diana Madsen

June 11, 2010 A Toast!

Bernice Swain and Barbara Sandford

Photo by Janet Burchett

June 11, 2010 Phyllis with Bernice and Barbara looking on

Outgoing President Phyllis Alexander presides over the final meeting of the year.

June 11, 2010

Phyllis announces the Executive Board voted to grant Bernice Swain Honorary Membership.

June 11, 2010

Barbara, Mary Kent & Elaine Welsh

June 11, 2010

The pergola and new brick patio provided the perfect setting for our final meeting of the year.

June 11, 2010

Barbara Sandford tells us of the latest Scenic New Jersey threat - billboards at the entrances and exits to NJ's major highways! Time for a letter-writing campaign.

June 11, 2010

Conservation Chair Janet Burchett gets her marching orders from Conservation High Priestess Barbara Sandford!

June 11, 2010

Bernice Swain, Ginny Dughi and Barbara Sandford

Photo by Susan Fraser

June 11, 2010

Barbara and her fascinator

August 29, 2010 Sandford Avenue Bridge Reconstruction

Bernice Swain and Barbara Sandford

Dan Damon's blog

Monday, November 15, 2010

Happy Birthday to Barbara Sandford

A little bird told me that long-time Plainfield activist Barbara Sandford is celebrating a birthday today.

Barbara is well-remembered in the community for having chaired the city's Beautification Committee for many years, during which great attention was paid to the appearance of the grounds of City Hall and the many planters gracing Plainfield's downtown shopping district.

The pine on the lawn of City Hall that is the focus of the annual holiday tree-lighting festivities was originally given in memory of Barbara's late husband, Webster Sandford. It was replaced a few years ago with another tree that Barbara and Public Works Superintendent John Louise selected, which is happily beginning to really fill out.

Barbara's love of gardening is also shown in her membership in the Plainfield Garden Club and her longtime advocacy of the Shakespeare Garden in Cedar Brook Park.

But many others are familiar with Barbara through her long years of working on behalf of the League of Women Voters, making that organization a hallmark of nonpartisan citizen activism on behalf of full participation in the democratic (small 'd', she would remind me) process – all the while being a staunch Republican of the Millicent Fenwick sort, which is sadly becoming more and more of a rarity.

So, from myself and all her many friends...


HAPPY

BIRTHDAY

BARBARA!

Wednesday, October 21, 2009

Republican mayoral candidate Jim Pivnichny with
Barbara Sandford, who hosted a meet-and-greet Sunday

by Dan Damon

Entering the two-week home stretch to the November general election, missteps by Plainfield Mayor Sharon Robinson-Briggs and Assemblyman Jerry Green have energized local GOP campaigns.

Over the past week, I have checked out events hosted for mayoral candidate Jim Pivnichny and Assembly candidate 'Bo' Vastine, to find them packed wall-to-wall with folks who say they are fed up with 'business as usual' and sense a real opportunity to change the electoral landscape this time around.

To those who believe in a two-party system (and I certainly hope that includes Green, Robinson-Briggs and their supporters), these signs of life among Republicans can only come as a breath of fresh air after years of somnolence in Plainfield's Grand Old Party.

One of the problems of one-party dominance is that there is no incentive to draw in new talent and groom successors. (Why should we? We're gonna ride this rollercoaster to the end of the line.)

Another is that ideas for solving new (and old) problems and issues suffocate for lack of oxygen in rooms that are filled with the blah-blah-blah of pols patting themselves on the back for their honors and titles.

Not to mention using governmental powers as if they belonged to the official personally and not to the public. Consider this –

•Assemblyman Jerry Green used the cops to physically hustle a duly-elected City Committee member out of a June meeting at the YWCA, and

•Mayor Sharon used the cops to physically oust Senior Center member Pivnichny when he tried to ask questions at her recent monthly Seniors meeting.

The way the pols see it the police are not there to de-escalate situations, but to do as the pols want as they make up their own interpretations of the law.

This – and the fact that the pols involved have not apologized to their victims – has gotten a lot of voters steamed.

Then there is the matter of Muhlenberg Hospital.

Try as they might, Assemblyman Green and Mayor Robinson-Briggs have not been able to wriggle out of their complicity in the closing of Plainfield's 131-year-old hospital in 2008.

'Bo' Vastine gets roars of approval from attendees every time he says, 'If it was me and Corzine was proposing to close Muhlenberg, with its 1,100 jobs and history as a lifeline for 13 surrounding communities and a couple hundred thousand people, I WOULD CHAIN MYSELF TO THE FRONT DOOR'.

If such a dramatic sign of support for the hometown hospital ever occurred to Green, it was probably muffled by the money he was making through the Alman Group, for which he was a vice president, and which counted Solaris Health System, Muhlenberg's corporate parent, among its clients.

Mayor Robinson-Briggs earns her boos from the fact that she has NEVER IN HER ENTIRE FOUR-YEAR TERM taken up her responsibilities as a member of the Muhlenberg Hospital Board. In warming to Pivnichny, voters seem to be saying Sharon's alligator tears over Muhlenberg's demise are just that – alligator tears, a sort of emotional 'cubic zircon', not at all the genuine article.

Voters are also upset at the thought that the Robinson-Briggs administration is not only INEPT, but may actually have engaged in POSSIBLE CRIMINAL ACTIVITY, knowledge of which Mayor Sharon may have attempted to suppress (see yesterday's post here, and the record number of comments – 28 and counting – along with it here).

September 16, 2009 September Meeting Minutes

Corresponding Secretary, Bev Gorman, read a thank you note from Barbara Sandford for her Past Presidents' Award given to her at the June meeting.

October 8, 2008 Priscilla Sandford

PRISCILLA SANDFORD
AGE: 55 WOLFEBORO, N.H.
Priscilla Sandford, 55, passed away on Tuesday, Sept. 23, 2008, in New Hampshire from heart failure. She had been valiantly battling cancer for several years. Her husband, Ben Wade, her mother, Barbara Sandford, and her immediate family were with her.

For the past three decades, she had been a resident of Bray, Berkshire, England, where she lived with her husband. She also was a lifelong summer resident of Wolfeboro, N.H.

Priscilla was born in Plainfield in 1952. She attended The Hartridge School and graduated from Abbott Academy, Andover, Mass. She received a bachelor's degree from Franklin and Marshall College, Lancaster, Pa., magna cum laude and was inducted into Phi Beta Kappa. She received her master's degree in finance from New York University in New York City.

She had a very illustrious professional career. Upon graduation from college, she was employed as an auditor with Coopers & Lybrand. She was a vice president of JP Morgan and worked for the bank in both New York and London. She was a senior lender in the London transportation group, providing financing for airlines and shipping and also for banks and emerging countries including Russia and Eastern Europe. When she retired, she was a director and senior credit officer for short term lending for JP Morgan, London, for their European and African portfolios.

Following her career in banking, Priscilla challenged herself in new ways. She successfully pursued a career as a pastry chef, and enjoyed baking, pastry crafts, and gardening. She was secretary of the local Sugar Craft Guild in Maidenhead, England. Priscilla was very creative and an extraordinary friend and mentor to many.
She leaves her husband of 28 years, Ben Wade; her mother, four sisters, 12 nieces and nephews, eight grandnieces and hundreds of dear friends. Her brother predeceased her. She was buried in the Sandford family cemetery in Wolfeboro, N.H. on Sunday, Sept. 28, following a brief service at the First Congregational Church where she was married.

There will be a memorial service to celebrate her life 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 18, at Crescent Avenue Presbyterian Church, Watchung Avenue, Plainfield. Another memorial service is being planned in Bray, England.
In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations be made in her memory to Huggins Hospital, Wolfeboro, NH 03894; Crescent Avenue Presbyterian Church, Watchung Avenue, Plainfield, NJ 07060; or the Lake Wentworth Foundation, P.O. Box 2235, Wolfeboro, NH 03894.

.Published in Courier News on October 8, 2008

March 23, 2008 Gregory Palermo interviews Barbara Sandford about Dogwoods

n his Plainfield Tree Blog, Gregory Palermo writes:

I have heard the trees identified as witch hazel (They're not.) Or spice bush. (Not that either.) Nonagenarian Barbara Sandford tells me that, when her children were very young, she taught them that the Cedarbrook Park trees were called Cornus mas (a.k.a. Cornelian cherry dogwood. Barbara has known that the trees were dogwoods for quite a while.) After I planted some Cornus mas in my own garden, I noticed that the Cedarbrook Park trees invariably flowered two weeks before my trees or anyone else's Cornelian cherry dogwoods. So my bet is that the Cedarbrook Park trees are not Cornus mas, but rather Cornus officinalis, a very rare bird and a close Japanese cousin to the European Cornus mas. Cornus officinalis is supposed to flower earlier than Cornus mas and berry later. Whereas Cornus mas berries in July, Cornus officinalis is supposed to berry in September. I have never gotten myself well enough organized to check for berries in September, though. This season I'll do it without fail.

June 2008 Greg Palermo's blog: Plainfield Trees

The rarity of fringetrees can inspire deviant behavior in susceptible subjects. Plainfield tree lady Barbara Sandford took me trespassing into the backyard of a house on Sleepy Hollow Lane to see one in bloom a few weeks back. (I place the blame for this transgression entirely on her.)

2007 Gregory Palermo's Tree Blog

2007 January thru May Board and Meeting Minutes

May 16, 2007 Member Meeting Minutes:

Conservation: Conservation Watch, Barbara Sandford is mentioned for her part in founding the National Coalition to Preserve Scenic Beauty.

2007 January thru June Meeting Minutes

January 18, 2007 Excerpt:

Barbara Sandford informed members that Scenic America continues to advocate for removal of billboards on our highways. She suggested that Scenic America be nominated as a project to receive money from the Growing Fund.

September 2007 Catch the Wave

Mary Kent, Susan Lorentzen, Diana Madsen, Darlene Kasten, Evie Madsen, Nancy Plumeri, Barbara Sanford, Bernice Swain, Judy Buehler, Phyllis Alexander, Lorraine Ciemniecki and Laurie Skorge

Plainfield Country Club
Plainfield, NJ

September 2007 Catch the Wave

Mary Kent, Susan Lorentzen, Diana Madsen, Darlene Kasten, Evie Madsen, Nancy Plumeri, Barbara Sanford, Mandy Zachariades, Bernice Swain, Judy Buehler, Phyllis Alexander, Lorraine Ciemniecki and Laurie Skorge
Plainfield Country Club
Plainfield, NJ

September 2007 Catch the Wave

Evie Madsen, Barbara Sanford, Bernice Swain and Jane Burner
Plainfield Country Club
Plainfield, NJ

September 2007 Catch the Wave

Mary Kent, Susan Lorentzen, Kathy Andrews, Sally Booth, Diana Madsen, Evie Madsen, Phyllis Alexander, Barbara Sanford, Darlene Kasten, Bernice Swain, Nancy Plumeri, Bernadette Neill, Jane Burner, Laurie Skorge, Bev Gorman, Judy Buehler, Lorraine Ciemniecki, Lauren Shepard
Plainfield Country Club
Plainfield, NJ

2007 President's Annual Report

Excerpt:

We also saw some transition in our membership this year. Two members, Carroll Keating and Barbara Sandford, are now Sustaining members. A staunch conservationist, Barbara was an Active member of our Garden Club for over 50 years and was integral in the formation of the Scenic America movement which fights unsightly billboards on highways and litter.

June 2006 Shakespeare Garden

Barbara Sandford dressed as "Auntie Litter"

End-of-the-Year Meeting

June 2006 Shakespeare Garden

Tucker Trimble, Barbara Sanford, Mary Kent
End-of-Year Picnic
Shakespeare Garden, Cedar Brook Park, Plainfield, NJ

June 2006 Shakespeare Garden

Judy Buehler, Elva Busch, Barbara Sanford, Jane Burner
Nina Weil (taking the photo in background)
Shakespeare End-of-Year Meeting
Shakespeare Garden, Cedar Brook Park, Plainfield, NJ

October 5, 2005 Joseph Webster Sandford

Joseph Webster Sandford, 62, formerly of Wethersfield, passed away Sunday (October 2, 2005) at his home in Clive, IA. Joe was a lifelong summer resident of his beloved Lake Wentworth in Wolfeboro, NH. He was born January 11, 1943 in Plainfield, NJ and is the son of the late Webster Sandford and Barbara (Tracy) Sandford. Joe attended Wardlaw and The Hill School and graduated from the University of Colorado with a Bachelor of Arts as well as a Masters in Public Administration. He was an aviator in the U.S. Navy during the Vietnam War serving as a Lieutenant. He acquired his law degree from the Massachusetts School of Law and practiced law until he retired several years ago. Joe is survived by wife, Valerie of Clive, IA with whom he found his idea of Heaven; his son, Charlie, a freshman at Iowa State University whom he has adored, nurtured, and guided; his loving mother, Barbara Sandford; his five sisters, Cindy Landreth, Tracy Whitehead, Kate Morgan, Sarah Sandford-Miller and Priscilla Sandford along with their spouses and children. All will remember him peddling his boat around the Lake supervising and visiting those who were about. On his trips away from the Point he was usually seen piloting his family's antique auto early in the day to avoid the traffic. Arrangements have been made through Lord Funeral Home of Center Ossipee. A Memorial Service will be held Saturday, October 8th at the Congregational Church in Wolfeboro beginning at 11:30 a.m. Private burial will be held at the family cemetery off Pleasant Valley Road in Wolfeboro following the service. Memorial donations may be made in his name to The American Heart Association or The Boy Scouts of America.

2005 January thru June Board & Meeting Minutes

2005 September thru December Board and Meeting Minutes

2005 Shakespeare-in-Bud

Bernice Swain & Barbara Sandford

Tucker Trimble's home, Westfield

May 2005 PGC Conservation Chronicle

Editor: Elva Busch

Right Bite
Barbara Sandford brings to our attention information from the Shedd Aquarium in Chicago which she recently visited. She found a handy guide for making smart and healthy choices when buying fish for our tables. The best choices are fish that are abundant, well managed and caught or farmed in environmentally friendly ways. Proceed with caution, the guide tells us, when there are concerns about the way the fish are caught or farmed. The fish to avoid, at least for now, come from sources that are overfished or caught or farmed in ways that harm other marine life or the environment. The recommended list includes farmed catfish, caviar and clams, Canadian snow crab, U.S. lobster, farmed oysters and mussels, wild-caught salmon, farmed Rainbow trout and tilapia, among others.

Ask questions. Where is the seafood from? Is it farmed or wild-caught? How was it caught? For tons more info, check out the website:
www.sheddaquarium.org

Click on the Conservation icon and the Right Bite icon to learn more about what's safe to eat and about sustainable seafood. Thanks, Barbara!

June 2005 Conservation Chronicle:

Conservation Committee
This year's committee has been enthusiastic, committed and willing to work. Every member has contributed. The chairperson wishes to thank the committee members for their dedication this year. The committee has been comprised of:
Barbara Sandford Julie Shortridge
Mary Kent Diana Madsen
Phyllis Alexander Bev Gorman
Kathy Andrews Janet Burchett
Thank you to each and every one!

March 2005 General Meeting:

Barbara Sandford reported at the March meeting on the 'Invasive of the Month' the Norway Maple tree.

April 20, 2005 General Meeting Minutes page 2

Conservation Committee

Circa 2004

Phyllis Alexander, Bev Gorman, Kathy Andrews, Janet Burchett, Darlene Kasten and Barbara Sanford

2004 February thru June Board & Meeting Minutes

2004 September thru December Board and Meeting Minutes

2004

2004

2004

Barbara in New Hampshire

circa 2003
Photo by Jeanne Turner

Barbara in New Hampshire

circa 2003
Photo by Jeanne Turner

Barbara in New Hampshire

circa 2003
Photo by Jeanne Turner

Barbara in New Hampshire

circa 2003
Photo by Jeanne Turner

Tuesday, August 26, 2003 New London Garden Club Celebrates 75th Year With Flower Show

Jane Tracy is Barbara Tracy Sandford's mother.

Jane Tracy offered her property, the Morgan Homestead, as New London's first hospital which is now the Tracy Library on Main Street. She hired the Olmstead Brothers from Brookline, Mass., to design the library gardens and she co-founded the New London Garden Club in 1928. The new Community Garden at the Tracy Library once again reflects the original designs of these talented men and its current care is under the collaboration of Garden Club members and other volunteers from the area. Tracy operated the first greenhouse in New London, opened a 9-hole golf course, which later beams public, and was a member of a summer theater founding committee.

2003 September thru December Board and Meeting Minutes

2003 October thru December Newsletters

2003 December Newsletter

2003 January thru June Meeting Minutes

June 11, 2003

Barbara Sandford spoke on the topic of billboards on our nation's highways. She asked our club to spear head a drive to make New Jersey's highways billboard free.

September 2004 - June 2005 Newsletters

February 5, 2003 Letter from Zone IV Director Diana Madsen to Barbara Sandford

Sunday, November 3, 2002 15-room Queen Anne Home on Stelle Avenue

This is the home that Webster Sandford grew up.

2002 May Newsletter

[photo of Barbara's signature for the February 2002 Meeting sign-in sheet]

May 2002 – Barbara Sandford enters the Horticulture Show with her Fringe tree.

2002 October thru December Newsletters

Announcing Horticulture Show at Barbara Sandford's April 2003

2002 January thru June Meeting Minutes

February 2002: Barbara Sandford spoke about objections to billboards along 287.

2002 February thru June Newsletters

June 2002 Newsletter announces Barbara Sandford to serve as Club Historian.

2002 January thru June Meeting Minutes and Sign In Sheets

2002 February thru June Newsletters

2001 January thru June Meeting Minutes

Mention of Barbara Sandford and the "beautification committee's" work on the original courtyard garden at Plainfield High School.

2001 Newsletters May 2001 includes Barbara's tribute to Mrs. Willoughby Frost titled "A Fond Memory for a Heck of a Lady"

2001 January thru June Meeting Minutes and Sign in Attendance Sheets

2001

A Fond Memory of a Heck of a Lady

May 2001 Newsletter

Mrs. Willoughby Frost

Word has come that Mrs. Willoughby Frost has passed to her reward – and a "great reward" it should be!

Virginia, as you may be aware, is one of the Plainfield Garden Club's honorary members, an honor well deserved. We are all so proud of her exceptional talents – we were often in awe of what she could accomplish in so many fields.

One of her projects which I remember was with others running the Junior League Garden Club – it was a great way to inform the uniformed about gardening, and mostly about flower arranging, so there would be people somewhat trained to join the Plainfield Garden Club.

We had regular classes and projects to work out, beginning with three flowers (unbought – one had to grow or steal the flowers) and greens. Then Virginia or her sister, Dorothy de Hart, or Marion Loizeaux would criticize our work and highlight our errors. That was the fun part! She could be funny – "Well, clearly someone spent money on this one," or "You didn't need to cut down the whole tree for a few greens. Go out, look up, and find a branch that is growing the direction the way you want it – then cut that branch!"

Virginia was a respected GCA judge. She worked hard in the Shakespeare Garden – trimmed the topiaries, etc. She was also a landscapist in planning a project – or pointing out how to bring back to size a too large or vigorous Victorian shrub, removing a tree, or suggesting an improvement in design.

The Plainfield Garden Club decided to put in a "vest-pocket" park (which were the current rage at the time), and we found a narrow plot on Park Avenue which would suit the purpose. Virginia drew the plans and we planted it accordingly – letting her beatus into visiting the park each day for watering and trash pick-up. It was duly admired and very successful.

Another first for Plainfield city streets: Virginia and I guessed Jean Stewart went to a GCA meeting and came home with the idea to plant trees in the sidewalks along the curbs! After much study as to variety and spacing, the club bought a dozen Moraine Locusts with tiny blow-away leaves to give filtered shade. They turned out to be a real demonstration, as the city went ahead the next season and bought seventy-five more! Though 35 - 40 years old now, they still line Front Street, and Park Avenue from Front to the railroad bridge.

When the annual Flower Show was announced in New York City, Virginia and the girls all put their heads together to compete. Several times there were big landscape classes – a back door landscaped wiht proper planting – Virginia always in the thick ot if, bringing home the blues.

Or if she competed on her own, she got her material, books and containers, and locked herself in an upstairs room, sometimes for days, until all was set. Soak the wisteria vine in the bathtub, curve it this way or (change) that – the bed was important. The family was "on its own" at these times – but this meant so much to Virginia, there were often tears of frustration. She cared, she wanted it right, and the "blues" flowed in.

Mrs. Frost knew her duty, too: drove the Hartridge carpool, worked endlessly at the church (behind the scenes), had punch parties before dancing school, and all that. A wonderful entertainer, with everything "just so". She had her feisty side too – I have to mention that to give a well-rounded picture – but she could speak up at times for us all to hear.

Barbara Sandford


2001 Jan Mar Apr May Newsletters

From the Corresponding Secretary file

postmarked Oct 25 2002

From the Corresponding Secretary file

Thomas Nash Cochran

Thursday

Dear Betty,

My brothers and I are very grateful for the superlative efforts of the Plainfield Garden Club team in making Mother's memorial service such a success.

Until I visited the kitchen of the Guild Room at the Church, I had not realized how considerable an effort was required to make the event such a success.

Our thanks to you and your team – we could not have done it without you!

Sincerely,
Tom Cochran

January thru June 2000 Executive Board Meeting Minutes

2000 January through June Meeting Minutes

Excerpt from January 19, 2000:

Other Business: Barbara Sandford was unable to attend the meeting but she wants us to know "Every litter bit hurts."

2000 September thru December Meeting Minutes

Courier News April 8, 2000

Serving Central Jersey since 1884

Henry M. Freeman Publisher
Richard A. Leonard, Editor
Marilyn E. Dillon, Managing Editor
Keith Ryzewicz, Editorial Page Editor

April 8, 2000 Page A-7

GUEST EDITORIALS

The guest editorals appearing below have been selected from recently received letters to the editor that we consider particularly effective in sharing responsible views on public issues

Trees along Route 22 carelessly destroyed

Fifty-five years ago, Spencer Miller, Jr., the Commissioner of the state Department of Transportation, and Ross Pell, the DOT Landscape Designer, bought extra right-of-way on both sides of the newly established Route 22 in order to make special plantikngs to honor the solidiers killed in World War II. The Garden Club of New Jersey then established the Blue Star Memorial Highway on this land.

The first 12 miles of this highway started at North Drive in North Plainfield. A blue star was given to the mother of each boy who gave his life. The Garden Club of New Jersey designed the landscaping and purchased the trees (including many dogwoods and hollies) and shrubs to adorn this area, with the hope that it would enhance the scenery of all highways so designated; the trees also serve surrounding areas as a buffer from highway noise.

Now the plantings that have matured are being whacked down for the construction of the Watchung Square Mall. We only were told the highway was to be widnened and a new traffic light installed at the entrance to the mall. We trusted the buffer zone of trees would be allowed to remain, but now it seems they are changing the landscape completely with the sanction of the DOT. Most of the 55-year-old trees have already been cut, and while roughly $16,000 has been allocated to new landscaping, it will never be the same.

The despicable deed is done!

Scenic New Jersey thinks it is just plain wrong that plans made so long ago and carefully tended by others should be so carelessly destroyed. Board members of the Blue Star Memorial Drive, who meet twice a year in Trenton to oversee the Memorial Highway, ought to have stuck to their guns and said "no" to the developers.

By Barbara T. Sandford
president of Scenic New Jersey of Plainfield

Blue Star Memorial Highway Route 22

Photos of the Blue Star Memorial Highway Destruction along Route 22 in Watchung and Misc. Photos from Plainfield

March 31, 2000

May 2000 Newsletter

Tucker and Barbara attend the Garden Club of American annual meeting in Cleveland.

Ramona Ferguson, unidentified man, Barbara Sandford

Shakespeare-in-Bloom 2000
Photo by Ted Turner

Shakespeare Garden 2000

Barbara with a musician from Ars Musica

Shakespeare Garden 2000

The Dovecote

Ramona Ferguson (partially hidden) Barbara Sandford and unidentified gentleman

Shakespeare Garden 2000

Welcome to the Shakespeare Garden

Unidentified PGC member with Barbara Sandford

May 7, 2000 High Tea in Honor of Barbara & Her Many Contributions to Plainfield

Barbara Tracy Sandford

Painted by Plainfield GC member Geraldine Acomb
This portrait of Barbara hangs in her Denmark Road home

2000 Active Plainfield resident will be honored at a tea

2000 Retirement from Scenic America Board.

"She was a founding member" and "Written by Ray"

May 5, 2000 Letter from Frank H. Blatz, Jr.

Dear Barbara,

Never has a person been so deserving of the honor which is to be paid to you this coming Sunday. Unfortunately we will be out of town and unable to attend this tribute to an extraordinary woman. You have also been a source of support, effort and energy for the City of Plainfield and for us personally as well. How can we ever forget the magical entrance you made to the Beaux Arts Ball with Webby as Charlie Chaplin?

The enormous number of hours that you dedicated to the Beautification Committee have inured to the benefit of all the citizens of Plainfield. Your plantings at the train stations and the implementation of your concept of children's gardens on vacant lots throughout the City not only aesthetically converted eye sores but educated all of the children involved.

We thank you for all your efforts on behalf of our community. You have made memorable and lasting contribution and we all have been enriched by your presence and your friendship.

With great admiration and affection,

November 2000 Newsletter Barbara's tribute to Mrs. Charles A. Eaton

December 2000 Newsletter

Barbara recalls the infamous 1962 canoe trip

2000 January thru June Executive Board Meeting Minutes

2000 January thru June General Meeting Minutes and Sign-in Attendance

2000 September thru December Meeting Minutes

The Baltimore Sun February 21, 2000

http://articles.baltimoresun.com/2000-02-21/news/0002210337_1_turnpike-new-jersey-billboards

Follwoing road through hear of New Jersey
Turnpike is fast lane to personality of Garden State

SECAUCUS, N.J. – Every car owner eventually meets that one road in life with a personality that must be confronted or avoided, cajoled or negotiated on a daily basis, and perhaps no road has a personality as widely known as the New Jersey Turnpike, the service entrance to New York City.

The turnpike is the fast lane to New Jersey's personality. It is everything everybody else says about New Jersey – paved, crowded, smelly in the summer, bleak in the winter, a passage to somewhere more desirable.

When New Jersey was a dumping ground, the turnpike was its loading dock. When racial profiling was still an official state secret, the turnpike was its prime hiding place.

So it's no surprise that the Turnpike Authority's plan to put the first advertising billboards on turnpike land has caused some soul-searching. The authority rationally decided that since billboards on private land were already visible from the turnpike, why not make money by erecting its own billboards and renting them? The plan is to build eight two-sided billboards in the stretch between Elizabeth and the Vince Lombardi service area, hardly the Loire Valley to begin with.

The idea has come and gone over the years. Now that the authority is soliciting bids to build the billboards, some conservationists, public officials and drivers are objecting, in a Jersey kind of way: they see it as the turnpike resigning itself to the world's mistaken opinion of the state.

"I think a state agency should be looking to enhance an image, not detract from it," said Mayor James Cassella of East Rutherford, a town with a football team that still won't admit it's in New Jersey.

Meg Maguire, a former New Jerseyan and president of Scenic America, a Washington conservation group, said the road speaks for the state. "It's an industrial state in the north and an agricultural state in the south," she said. "If you start putting up billboards, it's a sellout state." (She said she had written to Gov. Christine Todd Whitman, but the governor's picture is already on anti-smoking billboards overlooking the turnpike from private land.)

Closer to home, Barbara Sandford, the president of Scenic New Jersey, also hates billboards, but understands the turnpike's limitations. "It's doing the best it can," she said, in a tone of voice you might hear at a parent-teacher conference. "It's just engineered to get you from here to there. It's not supposed to be pretty."

Wearily, Edward Gross, the executive director of the Turnpike Authority, defends his road. "The turnpike is a highway, and it has a function," he said. "There's a lot of development around the turnpike, but it's not the doing of the turnpike."

It is a safe, vital conduit for people and goods, he pointed out, and will be enhanced by a $41 million overhaul of its rest stops.

The road has an unadorned honesty, and there's a certain majesty to the great waves of wetland grass, the maze of the Bayway refineries and the mesas of capped landfills.

"It's a vigorous, muscular, masculine aesthetic," declares Angus Kress Gillespie, a Rutgers professor of American studies.

It can grow on you. Jack Eisenberg, working the parts counter at Industrial Truck Body off Exit 13A, opposes billboards. "I'm not for anything that hurts the scenery," he said with a straight face.

January 20, 1999

Helen Goddard and Ruth Crocker Floral Arranging Workshop
Crescent Avenue Presbyterian Church, Plainfield, NJ

Photo by Jeanne Turner

Elisabeth Loizeaux seated
Standing Marty Samek, Barbara Sandford and Toddy Pond

April 1999 Newsletter

Congratulations Barbara Sandford! Barbara was honored by Scenic America with their Stoffard Award, recognizing her "exceptional lifetime effort to control billboards and to protect our natural beauty." Barbara is a co-founder of this 20-year old organization.

April 1999 Newsletter

Congratulations Barbara Sandford! Barbara was honored by Scenic America with their Stafford Award, recognizing her "exceptional lifetime effort to control billboards and to protect our natural beauty." Barbara is co-founder of this 20-year old organization.

Scenic America's Stafford Award recognizes a diverse group of individuals and organizations whose leadership in fostering scenic conservation has had significant positive impacts, both locally and nationally. The award is named for former United States Senator Robert Stafford of Vermont, for his efforts to reform the federal Highway Beautification Act and his longstanding concern for the environment. Senator Stafford himself was the first recipient of the award.
www.scenic.org

January 1999 The Garden Club of New Jersey

Listed as "Life Member"

Garden Club of New Jersey Meeting Minutes April 26, 1999

ROADSIDE/SCENIC AMERICA: Chairman Sandford reported that she has resigned from the Scenic America Board in Washington after 20 years of service. The New Jersey Roadside Council is one of the six founders of Scenic America. They will try to bring Scenic New Jersey on board as Scenic America affiliate. She urged members to join their campaign to enlist help of Senators and Assemblymen as well as the Governor of N.J. in reducing billboards and combating the development of wetlands and open space in New Jersey.

Thursday, May 20, 1999 The Courier-News

Woman works to keep state's countrysides

by Christine Retz
Correspondent

Barbara Sandford has won a Stafford Award from Scenic America for her lifetime efforts to fight billboards and to preserve natural beauty.

Scenic America is the only national nonprofit organization dedicated to preserving and enhancing the scenic character of America's communities and countrysides.

Stafford Awards are presented to individuals or organizations that have made exceptional efforts to preserve and enhance natural beauty and the distinctive character of their communities.

The awards are named for former U. S. Senator Robert Stafford, R-Vt., an advocate of scenic conservation.

"Barbara Sandford is one of the few people who had the vision to recognize the need for a national organization dedicated to scenic conservation and the tenacity to turn that vision into a reality," said Meg Maguire, president of Scenic America. "Her leadership and commitment have earned our thanks."

Sandford is founder of Scenic New Jersey, which strives to preserve and enhance the scenic character of New Jersey's communities and waterways.

She recently wrote Christie Whitman to oppose the state's plan for a four-lane highway through South Brunswick.

"The route of the proposed highway runs directly through wetlands which are protected under current state law, and must be preserved," Sandford wrote.

"Highway funds should be spent on maintaining and repairing existing roads and bridges, many of which are deteriorating," according to the letter.

Sandford said her group is not against development but would like to see businesses and homes that easily fit into the landscape.

"Inappropriate and unplanned development is happening all over New Jersey, eating up our rural areas at a mind-boggling pace," she said. "Transportation planning should encourage a less sprawling development pattern rather than helping to increase sprawl."

PROFILE
BARBARA SANDFORD

Residence: Plainfield
Education: After early schooling at Hathaway Brown in her native Cleveland, Sandford attended Colby-Sawyer College in New Hampshire.
Occupation: "My occupation has been my volunteer program. For 28 years, Sandford headed the Plainfield beautification program.
Family: She married Webster Sandford in 1938, and together they had 6 children: Tracy, Joseph, Lucinda, Kate, Sarah and Priscilla. There are 9 grandchildren "and I'm the mother of a grandmother."
Hobbies: Music, especially the opera and symphony. She is a member of a church bell choir.

Thursday, May 20, 1999 The Courier-News

November 15, 1999 Letter to Governor Whitman

November 15, 1999 Letter to Governor Whitman from Barbara Sandford

October thru December 1999 General Meeting Minutes & Sign In Sheets

August 12, 1999 The Westfield Leader

OUR 108th YEAR – ISSUE NO. 32-99 232-4407 FIFTY CENTS
The Westfield Leader – Serving the Town Since 1890 –
Thursday, August 12, 1999 USPS 680020
Periodical – Postage Paid at Westfield, N.J.
Published Every Thursday

Garden Club Names Winners Of Patriotic Show Awards

WESTFIELD – The Garden Club of Westfield recently presented "America the Beautiful," a Memorial Day Salute Standard Placement Patriotic Flower Show, at four area homes on May 6.

Members of the Garden Club of Westfield, as well as the general public, were allowed to submit entries.

The National Council Top Exhibitor Awards were presented to the top exhibits in the categories of Design, Horticulture, Educational and Youth.

In the Design division, Ruth Paul, a member of the Garden Club of Westfield and Chairwoman of the flower show, won the Designer's Choice Award for her blue ribbon exhibit. She also took home the Tricolor Award.

The Holiday Excellence Award, given to the exhibit judged to be the finest in the entire Design Division, was presented to Eva Wiley, also a member of the Garden Club of Westfield.

The Award of Horticultural Excellence was given to Ruth Metz, another member of the Garden Club of Westfield, for her Moth Orchid. The Arboreal Award went to Nancy Julian from the Basking Ridge Garden Club, for her lilac double white.

Three Awards of Merit were also presented. Joanne Sullebarger, a member of the Garden Club of Westfield, won the Award of Merit for Tulipa "May Wonder." Kay Cross, a member of the Rake & Hoe Garden Club, won Awards of Merit for both her Lenten Rose and her Hedera Helix, varigated-ivy.

Barbara Sandford, a member of the Garden Club of Westfield, won the Educational Award for her exhibit on scenic New Jersey. The Youth Award for Design for Juniors was presented to Brittany Lanam, a member of the Rake and Hoe Garden Club Youth. Brittany also won the Youth Award for Horticulture.

For intermediate designers, Bethany Carr won the Youth Award for Design, and Allison Grow won the Youth Award for Horticulture. Bethany and Allison are both members of the Rake and Hoe Garden Club Youth.

The Sweepstakes Award in Design, given to the exhibitor earning the most points in the Design Division, was awarded to Mrs. Paul. Craig Stock, of Craig Stock Landscape Design, won the Sweepstakes Award in Horticulture for garnering the most points in the Horticulture Division.

Elsie Seastream, a member of the Garden Club of Westfield, received the Novice Award for her design.

Awards of Appreciation were given to four judges, as well as Mrs. Cross, Ms. Julian, Marilyn Litvack and Carol Iuso for their invitational door designs.

The Garden Club of Westfield is federated with the National Council of State Garden Clubs and the Garden Club of New Jersey District 5, Piedmont Plain. Proceeds from the club's flower show will benefit civic projects and scholarships.

Dues Bill

1998-1999 PGC Annual Report

1998 Winter Party at Carroll Keating's

Jeanne Turner and Barbara Sandford

Jennifer Higgins, Carroll Keating, Barbara Sandford

1998 Garden Club of New Jersey Resignation from the Roadside/Scenic America

April 7, 1998 The Garden Club of Westfield

June 1998

Thursday, June 25, 1998

Caption: SHARING GARDENING TIPS . . . Members of the Garden Club of Westfield recently met at the home of Louise Roche for their annual plant exchange. Pictured left to right, are: Lecia DeHaven, Barbara San(d)ford and Jennie Williams

April 15, 1997 The Garden Club of New Jersey

1996 Jan - Jun Meeting Minutes

January thru June 1996 Board and General Meeting Minutes

1996-1997 PGC Annual Report

1995 Common Cause 25th Anniversary Honors

www.commoncause.org

Please note PGC Member Mrs. Archibald (Frances Perkins) Cox '25 son is the Chairman Emeritus of this organization.

1995 May and June Board and General Meeting Minutes

1995-1996 Year Book of the Plainfield Garden Club

1995-1996 Annual Report

1994-1995 Annual Report

1994 Gold Medal Certificate for the New Jersey Roadside Council

The Star-Ledger Friday, May 14, 1993 Blue Star Highway

Mass planting along Rt. 22 rededicates a salute to vets

This article found in Barbara's memorabilia.

1993 Wisteria at the Pennsylvania Hospital in Philadelphia

Two sets of photographs were found in Barbara's memorabilia in a folder labeled "Wisteria." On one of Barbara's last visits (if not the very last) she told the Club to plant the Pergola with Wisteria. (The Olmsted Brothers had thought the very same thing in 1927.)

The first set of photos show Barbara with some unidentified person visiting the Wisteria and gardens at Philadelphia's old Pennsylvania Hospital. The Wisteria is not in bloom.

The second set of photos are just of the fully blooming Wisteria and surround Azaelas in the garden at Pennsylvania Hospital. The envelope in which they were mailed is dated May 6, 1993.

1993 Philadelphia

Left to right: Cindy Landreth, Barbara Sandford, Tracy Whitehead

Cindy and Tracy are Barbara's daughters

1993 Philadelphia

Barbara Sandford and Victor King

1993 Philadelphia

Barbara Sandford and Victor King

1993 Philadelphia

Barbara Sandford, Marc Whitehead, Tracy Whitehead, Cindy Landreth

1993-1994 Year Book of the Plainfield Garden Club

1993-1994 Year Book of the Plainfield Garden Club

June 6, 1992 Historical Society of Plainfield Secret Gardens Tour

June 6, 1992 Historical Society of Plainfield Secret Gardens Tour

1. Drake House
2. Shakespeare Garden
3. Victorian Hideaway, 935 Madison Avenue

4. Holly, Box and Ivy, 836 Arlington Avenue
King, Mrs. Victor R. (Elizabeth J.) '48

5. Green-Wreathed Carriage House, 825 Carlton Avenue
Lare, Mrs. William Sloane (Dorothy) '54

This is the Carriage House to 1127 Watchung Avenue
Ginna, Mrs. Daniel F. (Katherine Whiting Lewis) '15

6. England Revisited, 922 Hillside Avenue
Atterbury, Mrs. Albert Hoffman (Emma H. Baker) '15

7. Hillside in Bloom, 1314 Highland Avenue
Noss, Mrs. Henry (Edith Edwards Tyler) '66

8. Elegant Serenity, 1332 Prospect Avenue
Van Boskerck, Mrs. Thomas Rowe (Lucy Otterson) '15

9. Hidden Harmony, 1401 Chetwynd Avenue

10. Petals on the Paving, 1081 Rahway Road
Barlow, Mrs. DeWitt Dukes (Mary Lee Brewer), Jr. '65

11. Woodland Idyll, 1275 Denmark Road
Sandford, Mrs. Webster (Barbara Tracy) '50

A romantic "summer cottage" with rustic shingles and diamond-pane windows was erected in the wooded environment of Sleepy Hollow as Plainfield's heyday as a summer resort drew to a close, and the passing years have not diminished its sylvan charm. Bayberry borders the lawn, while trees in infinite variety – beech, cryptomeria, holly, dogwood, pear, red oak, franklinia – continue the woodland theme. Within earshot of the cottage, the children's playhouse restates the home's architectural design in diminiutive form. It was brought here from another family property simply because it matched the style and mood of this house in the hollow.

Nestled beside the playhouse is a circular garden, walled and paved with brick. Planted with spring bulbs, roses and early-blooming flowers, it is as fresh, colorful, fragrant and beautifucl as a summer bride's bouquet. And, indeed, it is a garden of the heart, the gift of a man and a woman to each other on their silver wedding anniversary.

Let's steal away from the world to follow a pine-needle path through dappled sunlight to the private garden of a very public gardener., chairwoman of the Plainfield Beautification Committee for the last 25 years. Established a half-century ago upon a formal Italian plan, the garden has now matured into a grove of slender cedars, underplanted with broad-leaf evergreens and flowering trees. Ivy, moss and ferns, primroses, may apple, ginger, violets, sweet woodruff and other native windings have been encouraged to spread across the woodland floor, returning the garden to the semblance of a forest glade. Here, in blissful solitude, the enchantment of bygone days weaves its spell.

April 25, 1992 The Historical Society of Plainfield

1992-1993

1992-1993 Year Book for the Plainfield Garden Club

1991 Annual Meeting Folder of Scenic America

1991-1992 Year Book of the Garden Club of America

1991-1992 New Jersey Committee Board Meeting Minutes

PGC Members Joan Vivian and Barbara Sandford on the Board.

1989 -1990 Annual Program Report

Our Christmas tea was held at the home of Mrs. Webster Sandford, her co-hostesses were Mrs. William Elliott, Mrs. Victor King and Mrs. John Tyler. The extremely talented Emily Brown and Janice Haer entertained us with a varied musical performance entitled "A Folk Christmas." We exchanged gifts from hand and hearth.

1989: Barbara Tracy Sandford '50 served as the Garden Club of America Zone IV Representative to the Medal Award Committee

From the Corresponding Secretary file

not dated, presumed to be 1991

Elizabeth –

These are the people who contributed to the PGC in memory of Betty Fitzpatrick.

One list is for your reference – I guess letters need to be written.

One list is for the Fitzpatrick family – Send it to the Sleepy Hollow address and I'm sure they will get it. Anne

From the Corresponding Secretary file

1990-1991 Year Book for the Plainfield Garden Club

1990 Exhibitions Annual Report

The Harvest Show at the Frelinghuysen Arboretum was held in September. Barbara Sandford won a third prize in her class, and Betty Hackman and Nancy Kroll received an honorable mention for their joint arrangement.

1989-1990 Year Book of the Plainfield Garden Club

Barbara's Third Place Ribbon 1989 Harvest Show

From the 1989-1990 Annual Report:

"The harvest Show at the Frelinghuysen Arboretum was held in September. Barbara Sandford won a third prize in her class, and Betty Hackman and Nancy Kroll received an honorable mention for their joint arrangement."

September 29, 1989 Blue Star Memorial Highway Dedication

Garden Club of America Zone IV Meeting April 1988

Garden Club of America Zone IV Meeting April 1988

Undated letter from Jane Burner to Barbara Sandford

Found in Barbara's memorabilia from the late 1980's.

Undated letter from Jane Burner to Barbara Sandford

1988 Correspondence from the Archives of Barbara Tracy Sandford

This is a sample representing correspondence and documents found in the archives of Barbara Sandford. Most of the documents pertain to her dealings within the Garden Club of America. She served at that time as "Liaison to the Hospitality Committee" of GCA. Within the file was also a newsletter title "The Foothills Follower" which relates to the Garden Club of New Jersey.

1988-1989 Year Book of the Plainfield Garden Club

1988 Archives

Contributions for the Polly Heely Memorial Fund

Mrs. Murray Rushmore
Mrs. E. J. Fitxpatrick
Mrs. F. Gregg Burger
Mrs. Philip Nash
Mrs. Frederic Pomeroy
Mrs. Alexander Kroll
Mrs. C. Northrop Pond
Mrs. Theodore Budenbach
Mrs. Homer Cochran
Mrs. Dabney Moon
Mrs. Webster Sandford
Mrs. Alden Loosli
Mrs. Robert Loughlin
Mrs. Robert de Graff
Horse Shoe Rad, [not legible] NY 11765
Total $430.00

From the Corresponding Secretary File, Jane Craig

1988 Plainfield City Hall Lawn Cherry Tree Ceremony for Police Officers

From the Archives of Barbara Tracy Sandford
Fred Blennger (sp?) plays "Taps"

July 13, 1987 Certificate of Appointment to Plainfield's Cultural and Heritage Commission

1987 Archives

Beautification: Mrs. Webster Sandford


This is just a small sampling of meeting minutes, correspondence and notes from the memorabilia of Barbara Tracy Sandford. Barbara was the Garden Club of American Zone IV (NJ) Director in 1987. 1987 is the same year Zone IV hosted the Annual Meeting of the Garden Club of America.

Also mentioned assisting with the planning and execution of the Annual Meeting are PGC Members: Kroll, Hackman, Hunziker, Fitzpatrick, Reid, Vivian, Madsen, Booth, Tyler and King.

1987 Documents From the Archives of Barbara Tracy Sandford

1987 Founding of the New Jersey Committee of the Garden Club of America

Sally Booth recalls that she, Barbara Sandford and Joan Vivian were the three members from the Plainfield Garden Club that help organize and found the New Jersey Committee which consisted of the 12 Zone IV (New Jersey) member clubs of the Garden Club of America.

1987 Archives

From the Corresponding Secretary file

Contributors in Marge Ladd's Memory for the Shakespeare Garden

Mrs. Philip Nash
Mrs. Lawrence Heely
Mrs. Richard Eckert
Mrs. Webster Sandford
Mrs. June [not legible]
Standish Ave and Wood Ave
Mrs. Bruce Reid
Mrs. Northrop Pond
Mrs. Alden De Hart
Mrs. E. J. Fitzpatrick
Mrs. William Elliot
Mrs. Charles Eaton Jr.
Mrs. William Shepherd

Total $445.00

May 11 - 13, 1987 Garden Club of America Annual Meeting in New Jersey

Barbara Sandford's Name Tag

To see Barbara's attendee folder: May 11 - 13, 1987 Garden Club of America Annual Meeting in New Jersey

1987-1988 Annual Report

1987-1988 Directory of the Garden Club of America

1986-1987 Directory of the Garden Club of America

1986 Archives

Beautification: Mrs. Webster Sandford

1986 October Zone V Meeting GC of Philadelphia

Barbara attends the Garden Club of America Zone V meeting in Philadelphia in her role as GCA Zone IV Director

1986 October Zone V Meeting GC of Philadelphia

1986 GCA Meeting Minutes From Barbara Tracy Sandford Archives

This is a sampling of documents found in Barbara's memorabilia dating from 1986. Most pertain to the Garden Club of America Executive Board meeting minutes. It was Barbara's first year as serving as the GCA Zone IV Director.

1985-1986 Year Book of the Plainfield Garden Club

1985-1986 Year Book of the Plainfield Garden Club

September 11, 1985 Garden Club of America Zone IV Civic Improvement Award

September 11, 1985 Garden Club of America Zone IV Civic Improvement Award

1985 Nomination for the GCA Zone IV Civic Improvement Award

The Plainfield Garden Club

The Plainfield Garden Club would like to propose Barbara Sandford for the Civic Improvement Award which will be given at the Zone IV meeting in October.

Barbara has been the instrumental impetus in all the efforts to beautify Plainfield particularly its business district and historic sites. She was appointed by the mayor in 1968 to organize the Beautification Committee and her involvement with beautification continues today and has expanded. She has served on the Beautiful and Clean Community Systems Committee, the Anti Litter and Clean City Program and on the City Commission on the Downtown Development Committee. She is "Aunty Litter" in costume for the schools.

She organized, planted and maintained the gardens along the banks of the railroad stations, the Madison park triangle, and been responsible for the town fathers purchasing 300 to 400 trees throughout the city. As a trustee of historic Drake House, she served as chairman of the Grounds Committee which restored the property to its former grandeur. After the riots in the west end of Plainfield in 1968, Barbara met with the black community and together they planned and planted a children's garden as a step to restoring interracial relations in a devastated area. Barbara combines her warmth, good humor and superb leadership to gain the cooperation of the people involved to complete the projects she understaffs. She has received recognition from the mayor and city council of Plainfield for her efforts on behalf of the city's beautification.

Barbara became a member of the Plainfield Garden Club in 1954. She served on many committees, worked diligently on the Iris beds at Cedarbrook Park, chaired the plant sales and served as President. Her involvement with the Garden Club of America has included serving on two Legislative and Conservation Committees for the past six years, the National Coalition of Scenic Beauty since 1980 and its treasurer in 1965. She was Vice-Chairman of Conservation for four years. Barbara has also been on the board of the Garden Club of New Jersey for ten years as chairman of the Roadside Council and Billboard Committee. She is a former trustee of the Crescent Avenue Church which included chairing the Grounds Committee and a member of the Plainfield Junior League.

Therefore the Plainfield Garden Club is proud to recommend Barbara Sandford who as accomplished so much to be a recipient of the Civic Achievement Award in recognition of her continued service to the community of Plainfield and the state of New Jersey.

Mrs. Robert Hunziker
Mrs. Robert Vivian
Mrs. Robert Hackman

1985 Nomination for the GCA Zone IV Civic Improvement Award

Thursday, December 6, 1984 Eighteenth Anniversary Program of the Mayor's Beautification Committee

"Bless your heart, Esther" – written in by Barbara

1984 Archives

City Beautification: Mrs. Webster Sandford

1984 Questover Designers Showhouse Program

Questover Program pages 1 through 55

Questover Program pages 56 through 106

Questover Program pages 107 through 131

1984-1985 Year Book of the Plainfield Garden Club

1984-1985 Year Book of the Plainfield Garden Club

Club History by Anne Marie v. G. Seybold

1984-1985 History of the Plainfield Garden Club by Anne Marie v. G. Seybold

This document was found in Barbara's carefully saved memorabilia and had never been seen before. Much of the information contained was new to current members.

Program

Mrs. Webster Sandford, who has been dedicated to the Plainfield Beautification Committee since its inception in 1966 and is now its president, showed slides of various areas in the city landscaped and maintained by the Committee. We also had speakers from other garden clubs.

Special events merit special mention:

In October, 1965 the fiftieth anniversary of the Club was celebrated with a beautiful birthday party – a formal reception at the Monday Afternoon Club. Mrs. Edward Ladd, III, the general chairman, and her Committees left no stone unturned to make the affair the great success that it was. Several past presidents and two charter members were among the honored guests. A pictorial history of the Club's activities highlighted the evening. The slides showed the plantings of Moraine Locusts on Park Avenue around the YWCA, the Salvation Army building, the Drake House Museum and the planted window boxes on downtown structures. We saw pictures of the Cornus collection and the Shakespeare and Iris Gardens. The decorations carried out the anniversary theme with golden touches everywhere. For a grand finale curtains opened to reveal six husbands, bedecked with aprons, seated behind a long work table! At a given signal the Men's Challenge Class got under way and frantically dealt with weird mechanics, even more weird plant material, and coffee can containers. Time was called and, by audience acclamation, horrible prizes were awarded and photographers snapped flash pictures. With a toast to the future Mr. Webster Sandford extolled the Club ladies and offered condolences to the husbands who must survive all kinds of crucial moments. A splendid time was had by all.

1983 Plainfield Beautification Display

From Barbara Tracy Sandford's memorabilia. These 5 negatives were found in an envelope dated May 26, 1983. The envelope was addressed to Barbara from PGC Member Betty Hackman. One photo is labeled "Community Gardens 2nd St - Liberty St."

May 1983 Plainfield Beautification Display Community Gardens 2nd St - Liberty St.

May 14, 1983 Centennial The Wardlaw Hartridge School

Founders of Scenic America

March 6, 2013

Mary Kent was given the photograph (which is really just a copy made of a photo) below by the NAL Chairman, Melissa McAdams. It is not clear how Melissa came to have the this copy, but we are happy she shared it!

1983 Photo titled: Founders of Scenic America Ellie Kelly (standing left) & Barbara Sandford (standing right) Seated, Marion Fuller Brown

Marion Fuller Brown, who as a state representative in Maine sponsored legislation that banned billboards throughout the state – a law that was upheld by the United States Supreme Court – died on June 3 at her farm in York, Me. She was 94. [Mrs. Brown passed away June 16, 2011] To learn more about her incredible life: Marion Fuller Brown, 94, Friend of Nature

Ellie Kelly is a member of the St. George's Garden Club, Zone VI. In 1971, she won the Zone Conservation Award and is a former NAL chairman.

And of course since we all know Barbara, we know about Scenic America. Barbara, having joined the PGC in 1950, is passionate about eliminating billboards from our nation's highways. She shares a special connection with Marion Fuller Brown with her family's summer home in New London, NH. To read more: Barbara Sandford

Scenic America is the only national 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated solely to preserving and enhancing the visual character of America's communities and countryside. We accomplish this mission through national advocacy efforts and technical assistance services, local and national projects, and the support of our state affiliates.

Throughout the country, our most cherished scenic resources and hometown assets are being obscured by a blizzard of monstrous billboards,badly sited telecommunications towers, a tangle of overhead lines, and a hodgepodge of visual clutter. Open space is being lost. Our natural and cultural heritage is being buried under unconstrained development and poorly designed transportation systems. America's beauty and community character are being obliterated by a steel curtain of visual spam.

But at Scenic America, we believe we have a choice about how we want to live.
www.scenic.org

Founders of Scenic America

Ellie Kelly, Barbara Sandford & Marion Fuller Brown
circa 1983

Memorial to Katharine Gould Foster 1984 found in Barbara Sandford's archives

Katharine Gould Foster 1984

It is with great sadness that we record the death of Katharine Gould Foster on Ja. 30th.

Kay first joined the Plainfield Garden Club in 1969, and true to her enthusiastic nature, she was happy to accept the responsibility of being a member. Whenever help was needed for a project, Kay was the first to volunteer, and whatever she undertook was done graciously, thoroughly and with enthusiasm.

She served as Vice President briefly, and with her great executive ability we hoped she would go on to be President, and it is our loss that she was unable to continue.

Kay was Horticulture Chairman in 1976-1977. Later as a member of the Horticulture Committee she volunteered to take the Cedarbrook Park Iris Gardens in hand. It was a major and noble effort to enlist others to help her on her hands and knees to weed, fertilize and restore the beds.

Kay also worked faithfully every year in the Vest Pocket Park. When the fence was replaced she herself helped create it and re-attach the espalier.

It was typical of Kay to give eager support to all Garden Club activities. Along with her many civic interests she gave a hand to the Beautification Committee planting annuals in early spring.

The untimely death of Kay Foster is a great loss, and we shall miss not only her willingness to help whatever the cause, but also the warmth of her friendship and engaging smile.

Memorial to Katharine Gould Foster 1984 found in Barbara Sandford's archives

November 1982

Shakespeare Garden plaque removed by vandals in city

by Victoria Shannon
Courier-News Staff Writer

. . . 'what anyone else would want with the plaque is beyond me. To us, it's got historical and emotional value. If it's not melted own by now, we'd like it back, no questions asked.' Barbara Sandford garden club member

PLAINFIELD – The latest act of vandalism to strike the Shakepseare Garden in Cedar Brook park has given the club that tends the plot a "countenance more in sorrow than in anger," to quote from "Hamlet."

Gone is the heavy, bronzehe plaque imbedded in stone announcing the garden's entrance to visitors since 1928.

Saddened are the members of the Plainfield Garden Club, which has maintained the small section of Union County park since 1915.

"We'll probably never be able to replace it, " said Barbara Sandford, a garden club member and city resident.

It's not that no one will know what the Shakespeare Garden is without the plaque leading the way; its history has frequently made interesting reading in newspapers and magazines, she said.

All the plants in the small garden are mentioned in the plays of Elizabethan playwright William Shakespeare, and the garden is used to stage the bard's dramas, put on by the city's Shakespeare Club. The club, founded in 1887, is said to be the nation's oldest Shakespeare club still meeting.

"I used to be a member, " Sandford said of the society, "but I don't like Shakespeare."

Instead, her times goes to the garden club, which meets every Wednesday to do the necessary pruning, replanting and general maintenance in the Shakespeare Garden.

On a Wednesday about a month ago, club members noticed that the plaque, bolted onto a large boulder, was missing. Club members believe it could have been removed only using some sort of tools.

"We've had quite a bit of vandalism over the last year or so, " Sandford said. "But what anyone else would want with the plaque is beyond me. To us, it's got historical and emotional value.

"If it's not melted down by now, we'd like it back, no questions asked."

Based on the current price of bronze, Sandford speculated that the plaque could be worth $600. Plainfield and Union County police ahve looked into the theft but have not come up with any leads.

She and others in the Plainfield Garden Club are anxious for its return and at a meeting yesterday even discussed offering a reward for information concerning its whereabouts.

The plaque is about 18 by 24 inches and weighs – "Who knows? No one's lifted it up since 1928," Sandford said.

Beneath a relief of the master himself, the plaque welcomes the public with the inscription, "Here's flowers for you, " from Shakespeare's "A Winter's Tale." Another quotation and a summary of the garden's designers concludes the text.

Among the numerous plants to be found in the garden – and in Shakespeare's day, about 1600 – are myrtle, lilies and roses, and mulberry, holly and apple tress.

Members of the Plainfield Garden Club are lamenting the thefit of the bronze plaque, pictured above, from the Shakespeare Garden in the city's Cedar Brook Park.

Courier News – November 1982

November 18, 1982 Courier-News Shakespeare Garden plaque removed by vandals in city

Caption: Members of the Plainfield Garden Club are lamenting the theft of the bronze plaque, pictured above, from the Shakespeare Garden in the city's Cedar Brook Park.

By Victoria Shannon
Courier-News Staff Writer

PLAINFIELD – The latest act of vandalism to strike the Shakespeare Garden in Cedar Brook Park has given the club that tends the plot a "countenance more in sorrow than in anger," to quote from "Hamlet."

Gone is a heavy, bronze plaque imbedded in stone announcing the garden's entrance to visitors since 1928.

Saddened are the members of the Plainfield Garden Club, which has maintained the small section of the Union County park since 1915.

"We'll probably never be able to replace it," said Barbara Sandford, a garden club member and city resident.

It's not that no one will know what the Shakespeare Garden is without the plaque leading the way; its history has frequently made interesting reading in newspapers and magazines, she said.

All the plants in the small garden are mentioned in the plays of Elizabethan playwright William Shakespeare, and the garden is used to stage the bard's dramas, put on by the city's Shakespeare Club. The club, founded in 1887, is said to be the nation's oldest Shakespeare club still meeting.

"I used to be a member," Sandford said of the society, "but I don't like Shakespeare."

Instead, her time toes to the garden club, which meets every Wednesday to do the necessary pruning, replanting and general maintenance in the Shakespeare Garden.

On a Wednesday about a month ago, garden club members noticed that the plaque, bolted onto a large boiler, was missing, Club members believe it could have been removed only by using some sort of tools.

"We've had quite a bit of vandalism over the last year or so," Sandford said. "But what anyone else would want with the plaque is beyond me. To us, it's got historical and emotional value.

"If it's not melted down by now, we'd like it back, no questions asked."

Based on the current price of bronze, Sandford speculated that the plaque could be worth more $600. Plainfield and Union County police have looked into the theft but have not come up with any leads.

She and others in the Plainfield Garden Club are anxious for its return and at a meeting yesterday even discussed offering a reward for information concerning its whereabouts.

The plaque is about 18 by 24 inches and weighs – "Who knows? No one's lifted it up since 1928," Sandford said.

Beneath a relief of the master himself, the plaque welcomes the public with the inscription, "Here's flowers for you," from Shakespeare's "A Winter's Tale." Another quotation and a summary of the garden's designers concludes the text.

Among the numerous plants to be found in the garden – and in Shakespeare's day, about 1600 – are myrtle, lilies and roses, and mulberry, holly and apple trees.

December 19 1982

Cannonball Museum Hosts Tea Party

"Abigail of Cannonball House cordially invites you to a Christmas tea party on SUnday, Dec. 19 from 2 to 4 p.m. in the Victorian Room". This is the invitation extended by Abigail, the antique doll who resides at Cannonball House Museum, to her "doll friends" owned by Mrs. Webster Sandford of Plainfield.

Abigail was acquired several years ago by Mrs. Wm. Elliott, president of the Scotch Plains-Fanwood Historic Society. The blonde, curly-headed doll had been packed away in a trunk for many years before she was displayed in the window of Addy's Antique Shop. There Mrs. Elliott spotted her and brought her "home" to the old museum house where she greets visitors every Sunday afternoon.

Abigail will be wearing her very prettiest party dress when she serves tea and cookies from an old Staffordshire tea set. Her guests will include: a 70 year old blond china head doll wearing a pink silk organdy dress, black kid slippers tied with bows, a blue hat covered with lace and carrying a matching silk parasol. Another guest will be a 100 year old doll with fixed blue eyes. She will be wearing a period wedding dress and her entire trousseau will be displayed including all her lacey undergarments, bustles, and going-away suit. The Campbell Soup twins will also be there as will an old china doll with brown eyes and red hair. Mrs. Sandford inherited many of these dolls from family members and through the years she has added to her collection. She hopes that some of her dolls will be busy with Christmas preparations – making cookies, decorating the tree, etc.

March 1, 1982 Certificate of Appointment to the Beautification Committee

1982-10-18 Letter from Edith K. Meffley

Edith K. Meffley, a member of the Ridgefield, CT garden club writes to Barbara regarding land she inherited called "Good Luck Point" in Barnegat Bay at Bayview Avenue and Lavalette Avenue, Berkeley Township, New Jersey, just south of the Toms River bridge.

Edith sent Barbara a pamphlet by Dan W. Lufkin titled "The Spoiler's Hand – The Rage of Gain" Social, Political and Environmental Considerations of Land Use. Only the the title page was scanned.

March 18, 1981 Meeting Minutes

New Jersey Roadside Council

On behalf of Mrs. Sandford, who was absent, Mrs. Seybold said that the Roadside Councils are joining together as the "National Coalition to Preserve Scenic Beauty," with the primary goal of protecting the beauty of our nation's highways. This new organization will be able to coordinate the efforts of many diverse groups across the country into one strong national advocacy.

March 18, 1981 Meeting Minutes

circa 1981 Barbara is in desperate need of a watering cart by Adele deLeeuw

February 28, 1980

May 19, 1980 Board Meeting Minutes

Toddy Pond, Evie Madsen, Jane Craig, Betty Hackman, Barbara Sandford, Bernice Swain

Barbara Sandford at the Shakespeare Garden

September 1979 Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) News

Mrs. Webster Sandford, President, New Jersey Roadside Council, underscored and concurred completely with Dorsey's testimony.

U.S. Department of Transportation, Washington, DC

Editor's Note: Barbara had been involved a good amount of time with an organization called "New Jersey Roadside Council." In the 1990's, she wished to take the New Jersey Roadside Council and make it into "Scenic New Jersey" – an off-shoot organization of Scenic America. She found this very difficult to do.

May 1, 1979 Webster Sandford passes away

WHEREAS, The Plainfield City Council was deeply saddened by the death on May 1, 1979, of Webster Sandford, a leading citizen of Plainfield for many years; and

WHERAS, Mr. Sandford, as a lifelong resident of Plainfield, was active in many community activities including his leadership position in the Crescent Avenue Presbyterian Church, his service as a trustee of Hartridge School, and his participation in the Plainfield Shakespeare Society; and

WHEREAS, Mrs. Sandford served his community in an exemplary manner as a member of the Plainfield Common Council in 1944 and 1945, and as a member of the Board of Education from 1946 to 1954, including a term as president; and

WHEREAS, Mr. Sandford had a distinguished legal career culminating in a partnership with the New York law firm of White and Case; Now, therefore, be it

RESOLVED, That the Plainfield City Council expresses its sincere sympathy to members of the Sandford family on their loss. Be it

FURTHER RESOLVED, That the City of Plainfield, in recognition of the outstanding contributions that Webster Sandford made to the community, will provide a living memorial to his name in the form of a tree to be planted at a location selected by his wife, Mrs. Barbara Sandford.

Adopted by the City Council May 21, 1979

1979 -1980 Special Committees of the Plainfield Garden Club

City Beautification: Mrs. Webster Sandford

Shakespeare Garden 50th Anniversary Party

Barbara Sandford
June 1978

Shakespeare Garden 50th Anniversary Party

Back of Photo

Barbara Sandford serving punch
Background Mary Rosettis

1978 Anniversary of the Shakespeare Garden

Top Photo: Barbara Sandford

Bottom Photo: Annette Trewin and Dodie Roome

April 12, 1978 The Times Mrs. Webster Sandford? A Very Special Citizen

by Edith Randall

Mrs. Webster Sandford, chairman of Plainfield's Beautification Committee, known to some as "Auntie Litter," is the guiding spirit behind much that is beautiful in the downtown Plainfield area. She has lived in Plainfield for more than 40 years, and raised six children here.

She has been a member of the Plainfield Symphony Society, Muhlenberg Hospital Auxilary, and on the Board of Republican Women. Mrs. Sandford also has been active with the Garden Club, the Roadside Council of the State, and the Downtown Policy Committee.

However, her primary concern has been the Beautification Committee, whose purpose has been to involve all citizens in Plainfield's aesthetic improvement and maintenance. Its slogan is "Keep Plainfield Beautiful," and Mrs. Sandford has been its chairman since 1972.

Mrs. Sandford's fellow committee members all agree that she is a very special person who is easy to work with and who thoroughly enjoys what she is doing. It is not unusual to see her late at night watering some forlorn looking plant.

All over town eyesores have been replaced by a pretty bed of flowers or a lovely little tree. On almost any warm spring day one can see committee women on their knees in the heart of town planting flowers or trees or guiding the placement of a bench to form a mini park.

Plainfield has long been known as a city of tree-lined streets. Mr. Dominick Zampello, Superintendent of the Shade Tree Bureau, plants all the trees, and here is a lovely variety: locust, zelkova, callery pear, sawtooth oak and linden.

Tom Judson and the Kiwanis Club are responsible for the landscaping near the railroad stairs on Watchung Avenue.

Mrs. Sandford as also spearheaded the concept of gardens for children and apartment dwellers. School children were taught the fundamentals of gardening and given tools and guidance.

Elmwood Park Gardens, Berkeley Terrace Gardens, and the Richmond Towers Garden Club are examples. Mr. Peter Ciampa and Mr. Nathaniel Henderson have been of special help in these projects.

In 1973 an anti-litter group, chaired by Helga Roberts, was formed as a division of the Beautification Committee, because litter can make the loveliest of community unsightly. Trash cans were decorated by local students and distributed all over town.

Local merchants are requested to help keep their front sidewalks clean. An especially fine example of merchant cooperation is Mr. James Henderson Jr. of McDonald's. The area around his store is always clean.

Plainfielders owe a debt of gratitude to Mrs. Sandford and to the large group of volunteers who work with her. "Pride in community is what it's all about," says Mrs. Sandford.

Unedited version, written by hand:

Mrs. Webster Sandford
by
Edith Randall

Mrs. Webster Sandford

It was a bright, sunny day for Plainfield's annual Fourth of July parade. The tree-shaded streets were lined with happy people waving flags and little children carrying balloons. Across from us old Mr. Roach was hawking his wares. A patriotic float had just passed when all alone, with a bucket and a broom, came a lovely smiling lady. On her back she carried a large sign "Auntie Litter."

That lady was Mrs. Webster Sandford, the chairman of Plainfield's Beautification committee and the guiding spirit behind much that is beautiful in our downtown area. Mrs. Sandford has lived in Plainfield for more than forty years, and raised six children here. Through all these years Mrs. Sandford has been a devoted worker for the good of her community. Along the way she has belonged to the Plainfield Symphony Society, Muhlenberg Hospital Auxilary, and on the Board of Republican Women. In recent years most of her effort goes to organizations that are concerned with the betterment of our environment – the Garden Club, the Roadside Council of the State, and at present the very important Downtown Policy Committee. But always first and foremost in her interest is the Beautification Committee in which she has given generously of her time.

This city agency was revitalized in 1967 as the Mayor's Beautification Committee. It's purpose was to effectively recruit and direct organizational and individual interest and support of the city's aesthetic improvement, to assume the continuity of the beautification effort, to provide a coordinating agency for municipal beautification efforts and to show others that Plainfield cares. Later other goals developed but always the slogan was, "Keep Plainfield Beautiful!" In 1972 Mrs. Sandford took over as chairman and has been its leader ever since.

Board members, when interviews, all agreed that Mrs. Sandford is a very special person, easy to work with and always anxious to share the work and the credit. "She puts her heart into what she is doing," commented Mary Woods, recording secretary. "And what is more she thoroughly enjoys what she is doing."

"Barbara really cares about Plainfield and all of its people," said Ann B. Fisher, corresponding secretary.

"She's very much concerned about spending money. If she can, she'll do it herself rather than pay it to have it done," added Harold Druse, treasurer of donated funds.

"Mrs. Sandford can never be replaced," remarked Helga Roberts, anti-litter chairman. "Plainfield is lucky to have such a concerned woman."

"She sees the good in everyone," said Hildegarde Hellerson, the first chairman and presently in charge of our recycling program. "Barbara is very dedicated. It would not be unusual to see her at eleven o'clock at night watering some sad-looking plant."

This could not be most anywhere that an eyesore has been replaced by a pretty bed of flowers. In fact almost any warm spring day you can see groups of women down on their knees digging, fertilizing, planting. They are preparing a pleasant spot where weary shoppers can rest awhile or friendly onlookers can sit an chat. Roomy benches, gracious trees, and lovely flower arrangements are a joy to the eye and a lift to the spirit. The mini-park at Park Avenue and Front Street has a gurgling fountain which has a cooling effect even on the hottest day. At the City Hall corner mini park there is a frost-free drinking fountain provided by the Rotary Club for thirsty passers-by. At Central Avenue and W. Front Street there is another attractive sitting place.

Then there are the trees – Plainfield's biggest asset. Even in her darkest hour Plainfield was described as a quite tree-lined town. In the past many trees have been planted by the city but for the continuing effort we owe a vote of thanks to Mrs. Sandford and her helpers and to Mr. Dominick Zampella, superintendent of Shade Tree Bureau. Mr. Zampello does all the planting. The trees were placed an paid for by the committee or donated by loyal friends of Plainfield. It is interesting to note the variety – locusts, zelkovas, callery pears, saw-toothed oaks and little leaf lindens. We should look up and enjoy them. They are a gift to us.

Trees and parks are not the only projects of this active group. If you see a bank of flowers along the railroad tracks, you will known someone has been working there. Tom Judson and the Kiwanis are responsible for the attractive landscaping by the railroad stairs on Watchung Avenue. Parking lots are not exactly feasts for the eye but planters with colorful growing things can raise the eyes above the black asphalt. Outside the shopping area the members of this council have planted Hogan's Circle at East Seventh and Franklin Places, the Police Station gardens and have put a Welcome to Plainfield sign on South Avenue. Historic spots have not been forgotten. The Drake House grounds are in their care. In 1976 a Liberty Tree was placed in the middle of Library Park.

A garden for children! That was Mrs. Sandford's dream. In 1973 she presented such a plan to her committee and it has subsequently become her pet project. It was and is for school age children, nine to twelve years old and for apartment based adults. With them she wanted to share the joy of gardening. She feels that "We can instill in our children the basic fundamentals and love of gardening that will interest them the rest of their lives."

It was a well-planned project from the very beginning. Outstanding garden experts were consulted. Students were met in their classrooms and given basic gardening concepts. Numbered tools were given to each prospective gardener. Pupils voted on and chose the name for their own garden club. Elmwood Park Gardens. There is also one in the East End Berkeley Terrace Gardens and more recently the Richmond Towers Garden Club.

Mr. Peter Ciampa, a retired engineer, has been with the project from the beginning. He plans and lays out the individual plots. Working with him is Mr. Nathaniel Henderson, waterer, advisor, and general supervisor. This year the Plainfield Science Center under the leadership of Mr. Booker Showers has been of great help.

However, to quote one of the children's slogans, "All the beauty goes unseen when litter makes the world unclean." In 1973, the Beautification Committee and the city decided to establish an anti-litter group, chaired by Helga Roberts. They set up an intensive campaign in the schools and the community at large to move the people to keep Plainfield clean. Mrs. Roberts felt that pride in their town and their school would be a good set of values to give our future citizens.

The anti-litter group provides trash cans beautifully painted by the students from Hartridge, Wardlaw and Plainfield High and Junior High Schools. They are distributed all over town. Merchants are requested to help keep sidewalks in front of their stores clean. Many do not comply but a notable good example is Mr. James Henderson Jr.'s of McDonald's restaurant. It is attractive and always clean.

"Pride in community is what it's all about," says Mrs. Sandford. "And caring enough to do something about it. We must have the dedication to do it and the determination to carry it through."

Plainfielders owe a debt of gratitude to Mrs. Webster Sandford and to the large group of volunteers who work with her. The best tribute we can give is for all of us to support her with our whole-hearted cooperation.

1. Stoop and pull a weed
2. Loosen some dirt
3. Water if necessary
4. Be sure your own property is attractive
5. Keep our city clean!

Plainfield will then once again be the Queen City of the East.

April 12, 1978 Unedited, handwritten article by Edith Randall

March 25, 1977 Letter from Celeste Moll to Barbara Sandford

March 25, 1977 Letter from Celeste Moll to Barbara Sandford

March 25, 1977 Letter from Celeste Moll to Barbara Sandford

March 25, 1977 Letter from Celeste Moll to Barbara Sandford

left side of the Star Ledger article

March 25, 1977 Letter from Celeste Moll to Barbara Sandford

right side of the Star Ledger article

August 2, 1977 City Gardening project successful

Caption: A tree may grow in Brooklyn, but these Plainfield residents have more edible greenery flourishing in their neighborhood garden on E. Second Street.

By D. W. Nauss

PLAINFIELD – Nate Henderson and the Rev. William Jackson were walking gingerly up and down the narrow paths wich were lined with row upon row of green vegetation.

Every now and then, the two men would stop at a healthy looking plant, crouch down and talk about the vegetable while delicately handling it.

"Do you know what this is?" Henderson asked while stooping over a low-growing vine dotted with small yellow blossoms. "This is peanuts," he said, not waiting for an answer.

With his fingers, he then dug under the ground's surface to reveal a white fruit about an inch long in the familiar shape of a peanut. Inside it was solid and meaty, with the nut not yet fully formed.

The tour continued as, no more than 50 feet away, cars rushed by and across W. Second Street, the commuter trains occasionally roared through town. Dressed in blue jeans, the tow men talked fervently about the joys of farming in the center city.

"You don't have to live country to be a farmer," said the Rev. Williams, looking over the small but very green plot near Liberty Street as if it were the Ponderosa.

And these two men, who are transplanted from below the Mason-Dizon line, and many other city residents, have proved that you can take them out of the country, but you can't take the country out of them.

The farming experiment is the brainchild of the city's Beautification Committee and is designed particularly for apartment dwellers who have no access to vacant land.

The lot, which was until recently filled with concrete, litter, and broken glass, is owned by the city. It is divided into 54 plots, each nine feet by 15 feet.

A little of everything is grown in the garden: beets, string beans, eggplant, black-eyed peas, turnip greens, sweet potatoes, cabbage, cucumbers and watermelons.

Henderson visits the garden daily from 7 to 11 a.m. and does much of the general maintenance. Otherwise, the gardens are tended individually by tenants. Some are obviously better kept than others.

Timmy Anderson of 120 Elmwood Place, just around the corner from the garden, keeps a watchful eye on his plot, which includes tomatoes and cucumbers. He said he likes to eat the results of his labors and what he can't eat, he gives to his grandmother.

Another happy gardener is Zeddie Allen of Elmwood Gardens. She said it is sometimes hard to tend to the garden after working for eight hours at her regular job, but it is usually worth it.

"I'm from the South, where we always had a garden," she said. "When the vegetables are fresh, they're really good."

The plot is also used by other groups to provide an educational and recreational experience for some city children. For instance, both the Plainfield Science Center and the South Second Youth Center maintain gardens tended by their youngsters.

The program is fairly cheap as well. Barbara Sandford, chairman of the Beautification Committee, said about $300 in Safe and Clean Neighborhoods money is needed yearly, with the remaining costs paid by donations.

"It's a marvellous thing to do with vacant lots," Sandford said. "I would like to see it go city-wide. There are a lot of vegetable growers in the city."

Sandford said there are also small plots being gardened now at Berkeley Terrace and near Richmond Towers.

August 19, 1974 Certificate of Appointment to Plainfield's Anti-Litter Committee

1977 - 1978 Special Committees of the Plainfield Garden Club

City Beautification: Mrs. Webster Sandford

July 4, 1976 Dedication of The Liberty Tree, Library Park - Plainfield, NJ

February 25, 1976 Letter from Betty Hackman

February 25, 1976 Letter from Betty Hackman

Wednesday, March 3, 1976 The Plainfield Times

1976 -1977 Special Committees of Plainfield Garden Club

City Beautification: Mrs. Webster Sandford

1975-1976 The Junior League of Plainfield

found in memorabilia

1275 Denmark Road

Plainfield Public Library
http://collections.plainfieldlibrary.info
/collections_browser/search;collection
=blueprints/search_results;architect
=detwiller;collection=blueprints;_page
=4/blueprint;id=12004;num=91/


Collection Detwiller
Title Addition & Alterations To Garage
Description Alteration and addition to garage for Mr. & Mrs. Webster Sandford at 1275 Denmark Road
Building Type Residence
Work Type Alteration and/or Addition
Elevation Yes
Condition Acceptable

Blueprint ID D-12004
Permit NOP1350
Year of Permit 1962
Microfilm Roll 234
Microfilm Frame 623
Condition 1003
Address 1275 Denmark Road
Historic District
City Plainfield
Architect Charles H. Detwiller, Jr.
Architect Firm
Owner Webster Sandford
Business Owner
City of Plainfield
Planning Department
Historic District Addresses
Address 1259-1275 Denmark Road
Block 930
Lot 21
Year Built 1895
Architectural Style Shingle
Historic District Netherwood Heights

1975 Images from Barbara Tracy Sandford Archives

February 1, 2014

This is the last one: 1975 Plainfield, New Jersey
Barbara capped off her slide collection with final images of the Elmwood Garden Club, the Pear Trees she planted along various streets and a Bicentennial-themed parade.

1975

Mrs. Webster Sandford is Plainfield's Queen

Plainfield Public Library Archives

Mrs. Webster Sanford is Plainfield's queen

Who is the Queen or our Queen City?
Who really is responsible for its beauty?
Who plans, plants, cultivated and cares for its beauty spots?
Who radiates beauty wherever she goes?
She is not Miss America; she is Mrs. Webster Sandford, the truly beautiful Queen of Plainfield.

Edward W. Taylor

1975

November 15 -17, 1975 New Jersey Federation of Shade Tree Commissions

Barbara is asked to be a speaker at the Fiftieth Annual Meeting of the New Jersey Shade Tree Commissions

June 1975 Plainfield Beautification Committee

Barbara Sandford as Aunty Litter

June 1975 Plainfield Beautification Committee

Barbara Sandford

1975 Elmwood Garden Club

This is a photo/postcard. The back is marked "February 1975"
Barbara Sandford is in the center, back row

1974-1975 Directory

circa 1975

undated photo. Barbara Sandford center, right

1974 Images from Barbara Tracy Sandford slides

January 28, 2014

On August 8, 1974 my father called me inside from playing with the neighborhood kids to watch Richard Nixon resign the office of President. This was an historic moment, the most notable day of 1974, and he wanted to make sure all his children witnessed it. Forty years later I recall it with clarity.

The unshakable stance Archibald Cox took against Nixon is one of great pride for Plainfield. For us long-time members of the Club, we are never surprised to learn of the grand accomplishments of our members' children. The ladies, besides being wonderful gardeners and flower arrangers, were excellent people themselves. The apples do not fall far from the trees.

Archibald's cousin's wife, PGC member Esther Perkins, founded the first recycling center in Plainfield in 1974. Esther worked with her dear friend Barbara Sandford on all Barbara's Beautification Committee projects: Downtown, the Railroad Stations and the now very successful Children's gardens.

Get a glimpse of what now is Barbara's 8 years of work: 1974 Plainfield, New Jersey

1974 Junior League Designer Showcase: The Martine House

The program lists "Miss Saidee Sandford"

1974 Designer Showcase Martine House Cover to Page 25

1974 Designer Showcase Martine House Page 26 to End

In addition to saving the 1988 Program for the Designers Showhouse of Cedar Brook Farm (aka The Martine House) which was organized by the Muhlenberg Auxiliary, PGC Member Anne Shepherd also kept the 1974 Designers Showcase of the very same home, organized by the Junior League.

Within the program pages, you will find mentioned many PGC members. They include: Clawson, MacLeod, Kroll, Davis, Wyckoff, Stevens, Loizeaux, Swain, Hunziker, Connell, Foster, Dunbar, Elliott, Fitzpatrick, Gaston, Hackman, Holman, Lockwood, Morrison, Royes, Rushmore, Sanders, Williams, Barnhart, Bellows, Burger, Burner, Carter, Clendenin, DeHart, Detwiller, Eaton, Eckert, Fort, Frost, Gonder, Keating, Laidlaw, Loosli, Madsen, Mann, Marshall, Miller, Moody, Moon, Morse, Murray, Mygatt, Barrett, Peek, Perkins, Pfefferkorn, Pomeroy, Pond, Royes, Samek, Sandford, Sheble, Stevens, Shepherd, Stewart, Stout, Trewin, Vivian, Zeller, Cochran, Mooney and Hall.

May 1, 1974 Barbara Sandford's dues notice

September 1974 Plainfield Beautification Committee

Barbara Sandford

September 1974 Plainfield Beautification Committee

September 1974 Plainfield Beautification Committee

Barbara Sandford, center, in white

Plainfield Beautification Committee

not dated – found with Barbara Tracy Sandford memorabilia dating from 1974

August 5, 1974 The Daily Journal

Caption: Mrs. Webster Sandford and a group of inner city youngsters develop their green thumbs as they tend to the Plainfield Beautification Childrens Gardens.

Inner City "Farmers" Dig Garden Chores

August 5, 1974 The Daily Journal

August 5, 1974 The Daily Journal

May 24, 1974 The Daily Journal

by William Kennedy
Journal Staff Writer

PLAINIELD – About 20 years from now Mrs. Webster Sandford hopes that on a very hot summer day in the heart of this city someone says, "those shade trees certainly make it a lot cooler here."

Mrs. Sandford, co-chairman of the mayor's beautification committee, has been working diligently since the group was formed in 1966 to promote shade tree planting throughout what she calls "Center City." It is the hope of her committee that all streets in the downtown business disrict will eventually have trees spotted in the sidewalks at curbside.

"The city council has appropriated $10,000 a year for our Plainfield beautification program," Mrs. Sandford said. "But we have received contributions from many different individuals, organizations and merchants to plant trees."

More than 600 trees have been planted since 1966 by municipal employees after they were bought by the committee.

This year's project included the planting of Dutch elm trees in the sidewalks along Watchung Avenue from Central of New Jersey Railroad bridge to the YMCA.

"They don't look like much this year, " Mrs. Sandford said of the scrawny trees. "But next year they will look good and they will eventually reach a height of 20 or 25 feet."

The Dutch elm are so named because they were brought from the Netherlands where they were grown to resist the elm disease which has been ravaging elm trees in this country. The new breed of trees is guaranteed to fight off the beetles which get into the elm bark and eventually kill the tree.

A variety of trees have been planted in the business district. Mrs. Sandford said, including morain locusts, callory pears, zelkova, sawtoother oaks, holly trees, and little leaf lindens.

"We are running these projects on a shoestring," Mrs. Sandford said of her budget, "but the committee of 17 members and about 40 volunteer workers has done a great deal with limited financing."

Mrs. Sandford also credited the shade tree department for its efforts in planting the trees, and other municipal employees for their continuous care of them.

Next year Mrs. Sandford said the Stillman School area will be the committee's target, and she hopes that trees can be planted along E. Sixth and Second Streets to complete the business district project.

Caption: With one down and more to go, Mrs. Webster Sandford of the Plainfield Beautification Committee picks up her gear and is on her way to tidy up another tree.

May 24, 1974 The Daily Journal

November 20, 1974

November 20, 1974

Elmwood Garden Club mid 1970's

Elmwood Garden Club

In the mid 1970's, Barbara founded "Childrens Gardens" or garden clubs within Plainfield schools in her efforts for the PGC as well as the Mayor's Beautification Committee. This collage was found in her memorabilia. The Elmwood Garden Club sign hung on her basement wall on Denmark Road.

1973 Images from Barbara Tracy Sandford

January 26, 2014

1973 was an historic year for our nation. The Watergate scandal occupied most headlines and the stand-off between Nixon and his nemesis, Plainfield's own son, Archibald Cox, riveted not only Plainfield and the U.S., but the world.

Archibald Cox grew up at 1010 Rahway Road. "Archie's" mother was Plainfield Garden Club member Frances Perkins Cox '25.

In May 1973, Professor Cox (Harvard Law) was named special prosecutor to the Watergate scandal. It was he that demanded Nixon release the tapes and he refused Nixon's attempts at compromise. It was this tough stand that eventually led to Nixon's resignation.

Also in May 1973, the Washington Post, upon learning of Cox's appointment, was quick to announce that Archibald Cox was in no way related to Nixon's new son-in-law, Ed Cox. (Remember he and Tricia Nixon were married in the White House rose garden in 1971.) Hmm.

Well, the PGC suspects that there is some DNA that floats between the two men. At the very least, the Washington Post missed the familial relationships between the two "Cox" factions – and probably because they were known to one another through the female sides of the family, which is frequently ignored when tracing genealogy.

Nixon's son-in-law, Edward Ridley Crane Cox, was named for his great-grandmother, PGC member Annie Ridley Crane Finch '21 who lived in "Graystone" on Park Avenue and was a fellow PGC club member with Archibald's mother, Frances. Archibald had many relatives in the PGC (most notably the Perkins and Tracy families) so other than the PGC (and most likely Archibald) no man made the press at the time any wiser to their "circle of acquaintance" back in Plainfield.

Meanwhile Barbara Tracy Sandford began a new endeavor: Childrens Gardens. She solicited large corporations (Bell Labs, Sears) and received monies to start the gardens. Most notably, she started the Elmwood Garden Club, near the now famous Elmwood apartments in the West End. Local award-winning filmmaker Alrick Brown is working on a new film titled My Manz which is about growing up in the Elmwood Garden Projects of Plainfield.

To see what Elmwood looked like in '73 and other parts of the Queen City:

1973 Plainfield, New Jersey

1973-1974 PGC Directory

1973-1974 Beautification and Shade Tree Chairman

September 1973 Plainfield Beautification Committee

This photo is from the Barbara Tracy Sandford memorabilia. It was 1 of 17 slides found.

Slide stamp: MAY73
Handwritten notation: Lang Adult Gardeners Mrs. Hall

NOTE: Barbara Tracy Sandford far right

November 8, 1973 The Plainfield Times

Beautification Awards Highlight City Dinner

Dorothy Perrucci

PLAINFIELD – The Plainfield Beautification Committee held its 7th Annual Awards Program at the Arbor Inn last Tuesday night attended by more than 150 persons. Mayor Frank Blatz, chairman of the Beautification Committee, and Mrs. Barbara Sandford, co-chairman, cohosted the awards dinner.

Mayor Blatz praised the work of the committee, begun in 1967 during the administration of former mayor George F. Hetfield, and said, "We are still in business and looking good." Blatz added that the success of the Beautification Committee depended on total community support. "The track record speaks for itself. The Children's Garden was a good example of little people and big people working together."

The evening's main attraction was a built-to-scale replica of the Children's Garden on W. Second St., which this past summer provided an opportunity for city youngsters to grow their own vegetables, fruit and flowers. In September the children, with the assistance of members of the Beautification Committee, harvested much of what they had grown during the summer.

In a brief skit, Mrs. Sandford appeared as "Aunty Litter" and described the Committee's new IBOTPUL (I Bend Over To Pick Up Litter) campaign. Holding a broom and pushing a litter cart, Mrs. Sandford explained the "fun" in picking up bottles, cans, and debris from city streets and tossing them in proper disposal units.

During the slide presentation, the Children's Garden and other projects the Committee has initiated were shown. Also shown were grounds for which responsible individuals were awarded beautification certificates. Mrs. Sandford explained that the fountain at Madison Park on the corner of E. Front St. would be switch to a single spout in the near future.

Mayor Blatz presented awards to area businesses for their contributions of equipment, plants, and seeds and to individuals who helped youngsters maintain the garden throughout the summer.

Beautification certificates were presented to local businesses, organizations and individuals for continuing maintenance and upkeep of municipal and private grounds. Carman Rea, 1004-1002 Putnam Ave., was honored for having "the greenest, most weed free, and most beautiful lawn in town."

Caption: BEAUTIFICATION DISCUSSED – Plainfield Mayor Frank Blatz, chairman of the City's Beautification Committee, and co-chairman Mrs. Barbara Sandford discuss the program for the Beautification Committee's 7th Annual Banquet Night held at the Arbor Inn last evening (Photo by Dorothy Perrucci)

November 8, 1973 The Plainfield Times

October 26, 1973 Bell Labs news

Caption: Bell Labs' John Croot (second from left) and Robert Lang of New Jersey Bell watch as a fence post hole is drilled by a New Jersey Bell lineman. Building the fence was one of the first stages of the project. Also watching are Mrs. Webster Sandford, chairman of the Plainfield Mayor's Beautification Committee (with umbrella) and Mrs. Burton Cathie, coordinator of the Planned Demonstration School project.

October 26, 1973 Bell Labs news

October 26, 1973 Bell Labs news

1973 Childrens Gardens

As a spin-off from her work on the Plainfield Beautification Committee, Barbara Sandford started several civic gardens called "Childrens Gardens" throughout Plainfield. Each were had a corresponding "garden club" name and organization. Barbara then began networking local businesses, civic organizations and individuals to help create these gardens.

Her first endeavor was a vacant lot on the block bordered by Elmwood Place, West Second Street and Liberty Street. This garden was called "Elmwood Garden Club"

For more information and photographs: 1973 Plainfield Childrens Gardens by Barbara Sandford

1972 Slide Show from Barbara Tracy Sandford Archives

January 1972 was the beginning of the Watergate scandal and the end of President Nixon, thanks to our own Plainfield Garden Club's Mrs. Cox's son (more on that later in '73 and '74) Barbara Sandford was busy in town planting trees, shrubs and flowers. These images capture the '72 fire department and "Chief for a Day" event; more Netherwood improvements; and other shots of the Queen City. Enjoy!

1972 Plainfield New Jersey

1972 Plainfield Beautification Committee Madison Park

Barbara Sandford

Click here for more information and photos

Thursday, June 29, 1972 City gets more trees and shrubs

Caption: Members of Plainfield Beautification Committee spruce up front of Plainfield Police Divison Headquarters with flowers as part of annual program. Left to right are Mrs. Webster Sandford, Mrs. Richard B. Tyler and Mrs. Craig Harvey

June 29, 1972 Courier News Photo by Fred Keesing

Mrs. Webster Sandford, Mrs. Richard B. Tyler and Mrs. Craig Harvey

1972 National Audubon Society

May 10, 1972 Letter to Barbara Sandford from Florence P. Dwyer

January 13, 2014 Release of slides dating from 1971

If you were living in Plainfield in 1971, you may have driven a new Datsun 1200 Sports Coupe that would have cost you $1,866 and paid for gas at .33 cents a gallon. Perhaps you would have driven to the movies to see Love Story or The French Connection. A movie ticket would have cost you $1.50.

In 1971 Barbara Sandford was making great strides in beautifying the eyesore that was Madison Park and other areas of town. Compared to the images from 1967 and 1968, she was enjoying quite a bit of success. Barbara's friends in the Plainfield Garden Club were also hard at work. Never-before-seen photos of Esther Perkins and Anne Marie Seybold have been discovered. Does anyone recognize the other women?

1971 Plainfield

April 1971 Plainfield Beautification Committee

This photo was converted from a slide found in Barbara Tracy Sandford's memorabilia. This slide is 1 of the 7 slides found in a slide box. They were rubberband together and wrapped around them was a piece of stationery from "FMC Corporation, Niagara Chemical Division" with the handwritten note "Rotary – City Hall"

Slide Stamp: APR71
Handwritten notation: None

October 19, 1971 Mayor's Annual Beautification Committee Fifth Annual Award Dinner

excerpts: Mrs. Seymour Perkins Jr. received a special award for her organizations of successful recycling program in Plainfield.

Mrs. Webster Sandford exhibited a group of slides showing various areas of the city before and after the Beautification Committee undertook projects.

Spontaneous applause greeted views of the flower beds in Madison-Park, the plantings, now five years at Depot Place, and at the Netherwood Station.

October 19, 1971 Mayor's Annual Beautification Committee Fifth Annual Award Dinner

1971 Special Committees of the Plainfield Garden Club

Dept. for Plainfield
Beautification Comm.
Shade Tree Comm.
Roadside Council

Mrs. Webster Sandford
1275 Denmark Road
Plainfield, NJ 07062

1971 Gold Medal Certificate for the New Jersey Roadside Council

June 5, 1971 The Voice

The History of the Club to 1970 by Mrs. Henry Noss

Then in 1967 Mrs. Bush-Brown, co-author of America's Garden Book (our Bible) gave a talk describing the transformation of blighted slum areas in Philadelphia by the residents under her supervision into happy streets and some beautiful tiny parks. Slides before and after testified to the truth of her words, spoken to us, our collaborators the Spade and Trowel Club – and to the mayor of Plainfield.

Thus was sparked the formation of Plainfield's Beautification Commission on which we have always been represented. This commission, plus such projects as our very own special work on the Vest Pocket Park, have been replacing bleak areas in our town every since.

October 1970 Plainfield Beautification Committee

Barbara Sandford

Plainfield Beautification Committee

Not dated, but found in Barbara Tracy Sandford's archives with papers from 1970.

Caption: In cooperation with the Plainfield Beautification Committee and the city Shade Tree Commission, N. J. Bell Telephone Co. donated 14 trees to be planted at Park Avenue, and West Fifth Street, adjoining the company parking lot and building. Admiring one of the newly planted trees is chairman of the Beautification Committee, Mrs. Webster Sandford; plant supervisor, J. J. Simko and community relations manager, Robert C. Laing, right.

Monday, October 26, 1970 Mayor's Beautification Committee Fourth Annual Banquet

Mrs. Webster Sandford, Mr. Dominick Zampello, Superintendent of Shade Trees for the City of Plainfield, and Mrs. Charles B. Hellerson, Co-Chairman

November 16, 1970 Beautification Committee's Work Plainfield is more park-like

Excerpt: Mrs. Charles B. Hellerson, who is now co-chairman with Mayor Frank H. Blatz, as chairman, and Mrs. Webster Sandford, a former chairman, have been largely responsible for the committee's many accomplishments, especially in its early days when the annual budget was "about $50."

The two women persuaded many businessmen and other interested citizens and civic groups to underwrite or to assist finically in various projects or to buy trees for the committee to plant.

Now the Beautification Committee has a limited amount of city funds available to beautify and plant on city-owned property such as Library Park or the City Hall Grounds. And its other projects are made possible by donations from the service, garden and civic clubs, and concerned individuals.

"A typical Beautification project was the landscaping of the parking lot along the railroad track at Watchung Ave. and E. Front St," Mrs. Sandford explained.

"The planting along the embankment, underwritten by the Plainfield Garden Club, cost more than $400. But the cost of the labor, shoring up of the bank, fertilizer and topsoil, before the planting could begin, doubled that figure," she added

1970 Gold Medal Certificate for the New Jersey Roadside Council

October 27, 1969 Plainfield Woman Honored For Beautification Efforts

PLAINFIELD – Mrs. Webster Sandford of 1275 Denmark Road was presented a special recognition award for service as member and chairman of the Shade Tree Commission and Beautification Committee from 1965 to 1969 last night at the third annual banquet of the Mayor's Beautification Committee.

Mayor Frank H. Blatz, Jr., making the presentation in the Arbor Inn, Piscataway, paid tribute to the hundreds of hours contributed by Mrs. Sandford in her effort to make Plainfield a beautiful city. Blatz is chairman of the Plainfield Beautification Committee.

Slides of "before-and-after" scenes of the city taken by Mrs. Charles B. Hellerson, co-chairman, of areas were shown. Mrs. Hellerson was last year's recipient of the special award.

A skit entitled, "Our Alley Is Clean – Is Yours?" was presented by the Junior Woman's Club of the Monday Afternoon Club. Music was furnished by Hubie Scott's Jazz Band.

The invocation was pronounced by the Rev. William G. Geiger, pastor of Netherwood Reformed Church.

Former Mayor George F. Hetfield was applauded for his efforts to transform the Queen City into "Marigold City." He had donated thousands of marigold plants for planting in Plainfield.

Little Roxanne Brown, nurse for the day, and John Polunas, fireman for the day, both winners in the antilitter contests, received the plaudits of the crowd. Both youngsters were garbed in appropriate costumes.

Blatz presented certificates to the following organizations and persons for their contributions toward the beautification of Plainfield:

Caption: Mayor Frank H. Blatz Jr. presents special recognition award for service to Mrs. Webster Sandford at third annual banquet of Mayor's Beautification Committee

January 7, 2014 Film of 1970's, slides taken by Barbara Tracy Sandford

What was Plainfield like in 1970? Or for that matter, New Jersey or the US? Thanks to the late Barbara Tracy Sandford, we can all enjoy a look back to 1970 – the year of Kent State, the Beatles' break up, and the first Monday Night football debut with Howard Cosell.

Click here: 1970 Plainfield, New Jersey

Barbara photographed various civic projects produced by her Beautification Committee from 1967 to the early 1980's. Stay tuned for more film from over a decade of her good works.

1969 Film of Barbara Tracy Sandford slides

The year 1969 was memorable. The nation's headlines were filled with news of Nixon's 1st year in the White House; anti-Vietnam War demonstrations; Woodstock; Neil Armstrong's walk on the Moon; and the Miracle Mets.

Barbara Sandford was busy here in Plainfield with beautifying the new public library and park; inspiring the Club with the Vest Pocket Park civic project; and finally garnering some recognition from the mayor's office for her efforts. See it all here: 1969 Plainfield

Tuesday, October 28, 1969 The Courier-News

Mayor Frank H. Blatz presents special recognition away for service to Mrs. Webster Sandford at third annual banquet of Mayor's Beautification Committee last night

1969 Barbara Sandford's blue ribbon for show hosted by Garden Club of Watchung

1969 Barbara Sandford's blue ribbon for show hosted by Garden Club of Watchung

back side

January 7, 2014 Film of 1967, slides taken by Barbara Tracy Sandford

An infamous year for Plainfield and Barbara Tracy Sandford had just begun her decades-long vocation of cleaning up parts of her city.

Please visit the 1967 Archives and read the letter dated August 21, 1967 to Barbara at her summer home in NH, written from Bev Reid on the state of Plainfield:

"Hear you were down briefly so perhaps you saw for yourself the trees all cut down on the railroad tracks opposite the Police Station. I was horrified and took Virginia [Frost] down. We investigated inside and were told the Police wanted to clear the area there so a sniper could not hide in the trees and inhibit the Police Force in another riot situation. I can understand this – and all the more reason for roses or pyracantha on the banks – let someone with a gun get mixed up with THAT! It still looks stupid and severe – but what can you do –"

Bev then goes on to complain about the color of the benches for "bus people" being "obvious."

This video is much shorter: 1967 Plainfield

August 21, 1967 Letter from Bev Reid to Barbara Sandford

August 21, 1967 Letter from Bev Reid to Barbara Sandford

Barbara,

Just a line re "P.field Beauty." Hear you were down briefly so perhaps you saw for yourself the trees all cut down on the railroad tracks opposite the Police Station. I was horrified and took Virginia down. We investigated inside and were told the Police wanted to clear the area there so a sniper could not hide in the trees and inhibit the Police Force in another riot situation. I can understand this – and all the more reason for roses or pyracantha on the banks – let someone with a gun get mixed up with THAT! It still looks stupid and severe – but what can you do –

#2. Containers in front of The Needle & Consommers Liquor I vote as being the prettiest in town. They are lush-blooming and I think bear copying. Red geraniums, white cascade petunias, ageratum (sp?) stunning. Mrs. H's in front of Commerce is blooming but stupid with that TREE! I don't think any flowers have been planted in front of Blairs-Vogue etc. which goes on with my duties. I have been around and do think yew or arborvitae should go at the station – but I think we should wait and do a spring planting. I was talking to Dom. Toresco and he doesn't think the plants will get a chance to become well enough established before the Earth freezes – I would hate to see so much money go into each pot and be taking a chance on it living. Go ahead set the pots up on the platform – then come middle of Nov. we could stick a cut scotch pine in for Christmas and I think you'll be amazed at how long that will last and be attractive. Come spring – bang in goes our living green and a whole season of being able to acclimate.

Thats all from me. Am on to the hills Saturday. Will watch carefully whats done abroad perhaps some new ideas will sprout forth. One last thing – the benches for bus people are being painted green & yellow – they should not be so obvious 00

See you in October. hope your getting a well deserved rest & not running a hotel. Love, Bev

August 21, 1967 Letter from Bev Reid to Barbara Sandford

June 13, 2012 Photo sent in from Frederic Detwiller ca. 1965

This was taken circa 1965 at Cath Detwiller's home on Clarke's Lane

June 13, 2012
Sally Kroll wrote in to say that these four women are Cath Detwiller, Betty Fitzpatrick, Anne Marie Seybold and Barbara Sandford

Barbara Sandford's personal invitation to the 50th Anniversary Party in 1965

1965 50th Anniversary of the Garden Club

Barbara Sandford on left, Hazel Lockwood and Victoria Furman

1965 50th Anniversary of the Garden Club

Webster Sandford on right.

1965 Anniversary Party

Barbara Sandford seated with pink corsage, second from right.

1915-1965 History of the Plainfield Garden Club

1915-1965 History of the Plainfield Garden Club

April 23, 1965 Garden Club History Reviews Past 50 Years

A history of the Plainfield Garden Club was presented to members Wednesday by Mrs. Edward H. Ladd 3rd at the club's annual meeting in the home of Mrs. Edgar F. Davis, 1080 Rahway Rd. Mrs. Alexander Kroll was co-hostess.

The history has been published to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Garden Club, which was formed in 1915.

The first part of the history was written by a charter member, now deceased, Mrs. Thomas Van Boskerck. The second part, covering the years from 1940-1965, was written by Mrs. Gerald Furman, and highlights the accomplishment of all the departments of the club.

Special emphasis is given to the three continuing projects: the Shakespeare Garden started in 1927; the Dogwood Collection, sponsored since 1946; and the Iris Garden begun in 1932; all in Cedar Brook Park. These three gardens have received national recognition and many awards for excellence.

The Union County Park Commission has just named the dogwood planting, "The Harriette R. Halloway Cornus Collection," in appreciation of the club's many years of service to park activities. Miss Halloway, 90, is the Garden Club's oldest living member and an authority on cornus and iris.

Mrs. Edwin J. Fitzpatrick, nominating chairman, present the slate of officers which was elected as follows: President, Mrs. Wayne J. Holman Jr.; first vice president, Mrs. David Sanders; second vice president, Mrs. F. Gregg Burger; treasurer, Mrs. William K. Dunbar Jr.; recording secretary, Mrs. C. Northrup Pond; and corresponding secretary, Mrs. C. Benson Wigton Jr.

Mrs. Holman and Mrs. Sandford will attend the annual meeting of the Garden Club of America in Cleveland, Ohio from May 10-14. Mrs. Holman will present a resume of recent program given by members of the Plainfield Club on the botanical background of the mallow plant family.

Mrs. John Wells of Valley Road, Watchung, said the club will again give scholarships to the Audubon summer camps or the N. J. State School of Conservation at Stokes Forest, as has been done since 1941. School teachers and scout leaders are eligible to apply for the scholarships.

A colored movie, entitled "Wings Over Blitzen," was shown, picturing wildlife in its natural state in the Malheur Wildlife Refuge near Burns, Ore.

Tea followed the meeting. Mrs. C. Benson Wigton and Mrs. Blanche P. Nash presided at the tea table, which was decorated with an arrangement of white spring flowers.

February 10, 1964 Letter to the Drake House by Barbara Sandford

Dear Mrs. Mann,

The Plainfield Garden Club wishes to resubmit its landscape plan for Drake House Museum in applying for the Sears Roebuck grant of 1964 "New Jersey – Preservation of the Past."

Because the Historical Society and the Junior League of Plainfield have been working away on the inside of "Drake House, Plainfield's only museum" and because of our plan and small efforts to "do something" for the grounds around Drake House, "the need has sprouted" and, praises be, the city Tercentenary Committee looked favorably upon our project and agreed to undertake all the work of the following paragraph. They are in the process of spending almost $5,000 donated to them by the city for paint, labor, bricks and laying medium on the driveway. It is most thrilling and heart warming.

You will notice that this plan has been redrawn with several changes; i.e., the driveway has been enlarged to permit parking and the mouth of the drive has been widened to allow cars to proceed in and out at the same time. Some "off center" planting behind the sign in the form of an American Hornbeam hedge has been added to hide the cars from the street. The walks are being created from blue stone flag to brick and new a new walk is added for convenient approach to the side street. The flag pole has been reset and is of a type that can be lowered for painting and repairs. The museum itself has received a coat of paint and looks very trim.

Along with the Spade and Trowel Garden Club has put in a memorial planting (again according to our plan) of three white dogwood trees and 100 vinka plants.

But for the drought last fall, the Drake House landscape committee would have had the area for the gardens leveled and put in a random planting across the back line of white pines and hemlocks with clumps of rhododendrons and laurel intersperced. This to be done at the first possible chance this spring. The next day ! we plan to begin laying out the brick paths of both the herb garden and the knot garden and to fertilize and seed the lawn.

Mrs. Harry Brokaw Smith will be in charge of planting the herb garden. Last years grant was earmarked for leveling and laying out the brick paths. This years grant, if we are lucky, will go toward the small hedge of holly which surrounds that garden.

With this tremendous boost, we feel at last that the ball is rolling and with luck, our goal will be reached.

Our goal? To have the grounds around Drake House a true demonstration of landscaping as it was in 1777, when Washington stood on the porch and directed his troops in the battle of the Short Hills.

Plainfield's part in the celebration of New Jersey's Tercentenery is to reenact this battle in June with the help of the Queen's Guard, an R. O. T. C. unit of Rutgers University.

Please help us to be ready.

Respectfully submitted,

Barbara T. Sandford
Plainfield Garden Club

Thursday, December 17, 1964 The Courier News

Plainfield Garden Club Meets in Lee House, Scotch Plains

The Plainfield Garden Club was entertained yesterday in historic Lee House, home of Mr. and Mrs. William P. Elliott at 11 Black Birch Rd., Scotch Plains.

Two new members were welcomed by Mrs. Wayne J. Holman, president. Co-hostesses were Mrs. Victor King and Mrs. James R. Bird.

Mrs. Bird introduced the program of readings on "The Symbols and Legends of Christmas" given by Mrs. A. D. Seybold and Mrs. King. As the symbols were describe, they were displayed b Mrs. Benson Wigton Jr.

A letter of congratulations from Mayor Robert C. Maddox to the club member Mrs. Alden DeHart has received a state award in the "Green Thumb Competition" of the New Jersey Tercentenary Commission for her work as chairman of the grounds committee of Drake House.

A member of the Plainfield Historical Society, she supervised outdoor plantain at the museum with funds for the planting donated by the Plainfield Garden Club. She also was awarded a special rose bush which will be planted at Drake House in her name in the spring.

Presiding at the tea table were Mrs. Holman, Mrs. William S. Tyler, Mrs. Webster Sandford, Mrs. Noah C. Barnhart, Mrs. J. Harold Loizeaux and Mrs. Charles H. Detwiller.

Thursday, December 17, 1964 The Courier News

The Courier-News
Plainfield, N. J., Thursday, December 17, 1964

Garden Club Entertained at Historic Lee House

By VICTORIA FURMAN
(Club Member)

The Plainfield Garden Club was entertained yesterday by Mr. and Mrs. William P. Elliott in the historic Lee House, located at 11 Black Birch Rd., Scotch Plains.

The ghosts of the historic homestead must be rattling their skeletons with joy this Christmas season because at last, through the efforts of the owners, the house has achieved the charm and beauty it deserves.

The guests stepped over the threshold to a scene of great charm. In the center hall stood a Christmas tree on which members hung gifts of candy, wrapped as ornaments. Later the gifts were taken to Lyons Veterans Hospital where for many years the club has contributed greens and gifts at Christmas.

The president, Mrs. Wayne J. Holman, conducted the meeting and welcomed two new members. The hostess, a member of the club, was assisted by Mrs. Victor King and Mrs. James R. Bird.

Stormy History
A varied and sometimes stormy history has characterized Lee House since 1725, when the original small structure was built at the corner of Cooper and Terrill Rds., by the Lee family. During the Revolutionary War, the house was on the line of march of both British and Colonial armies, and many a tired soldier warmed his feet at its open fires.

The little house was moved to Raritan Rd. in 1828, to be joined to another farmhouse built in 1750 by Moses Frazee. One hundred thirty-five years later, Mr. and Mrs. Elliott had the house moved to its present location. Barns and other small buildings were moved also, and now are grouped around Lee House in companionable symmetry.

The Elliotts have added a wing to the house and restored the old brick and stone, the ceiling beams and original floor boards to keep it authentic Early American home.

The program was announced by Mrs. Bird. Readings on "The Symbols and Legends of Christmas" were given by Mrs. A. D. Seybold and Mrs. King, with incidental music played on the harp b 12-year old Joyce Heiman. As the symbols were described, they were displayed by Mrs. Benson Wigton Jr.

The first of the symbols, an "Advent Wreath," was made of evergreens with four white candles, which are traditionally lighted one at a time on each of the four Sundays during the Advent Season.

Gold Angel
A gold angel brought from Oberammergau, Germany by Mrs. Seybold, was displayed as the second symbol. The reading explained that angels are used throughout the world in forms varying from rough clay figures to the finest of wood carvings and porcelains.

Among symbolic Christmas greens are holly, ivy and mistletoe. Long ago it was thought that holly was the man's plant, ivy the woman's and the one brought into the house first indicated which sex would rule the house that year.

Bells, used to proclaim the joyful tidings, were shown and that beloved yuletide symbol, the Christmas Tree. According to one story, Martin Luther in 1528 cut down a small evergreen tree and carried it into his house, where he fastened candles to the branches and lighted them to share with his family the wonders of the Christmas sky.

A beautiful creche was shown as the most holy and revered symbol. The program ended with angelic tones of the harm and the beloved Christmas blessing, "Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace, good will toward men."

Afterwards guests adjourned to the dining room to exchange greetings before the centuries old fireplace. The tea table was decorated with brilliant red poinsettia massed in an old brass milk pan. Brass candlesticks and an antique samovar, from which coffee was served, completed the picture of early American hospitality.

Presiding at the tea table at intervals were Mrs. Wayne J. Holman, Mrs. William S. Tyler, Mrs. Webster Sandford, Mrs. Noah C. Barnhart, Mrs. J. Harold Loizeaux and Mrs. Charles H. Detwiller Jr.

Plainfield Public Library Archive

1962

BEFORE MODERN KITCHENS – Mrs. Webster Sandford (left) and Mrs. Frederick M. Lockwood demonstrate how the kitchen in the historic Drake House in W. Front St. must have looked in Revolutionary days. Both have served as president of the Plainfield Garden Club which is sponsoring a "Maytime at Drake House" Saturday for the benefit of the landscaping fund. The house and grounds are being restored to their original condition.

Plainfield Public Library Archive

This photo and event took place after 1962

BEFORE MODERN KITCHENS – Mrs. Webster Sandford (left) and Mrs. Frederick M. Lockwood demonstrat how the kitchen in the historic Drake House in W. Front St. must have looked in Revolutionary days. Both have served as president of the Plainfield Garden Club which is sponsoring a "Maytime at Drake House" Saturday for the benefit of the landscaping fund. The house and grounds are being restored to their original condition.

Plainfield Public Library Archive

This photo and event took place after 1962

BEFORE MODERN KITCHENS – Mrs. Webster Sandford (left) and Mrs. Frederick M. Lockwood demonstrate how the kitchen in the historic Drake House in W. Front St. must have looked in Revolutionary days. Both have served as president of the Plainfield Garden Club which is sponsoring a "Maytime at Drake House" Saturday for the benefit of the landscaping fund. The house and grounds are being restored to their original condition.

February 20, 1962

1961 Archives

April 25, 1961 Courier News

Mrs. Webster Sandford of 1275 Denmark Rd., president of the Plainfield Garden Club, and Mrs. Frederick Lockwood of 969 Oakland Ave., program chairman, will attend the annual meeting of the Garden Club of America to be held in Honolulu.

Mrs. Sandford will leave Plainfield tomorrow to visit her brother-in-law and sister, Mr. and Mrs. Frank R. Carvell of Rialto, Calif., before joining Mrs. Lockwood in Los Angeles Monday.

From Los Angeles they will fly to Hawaii, where they will be entertained by the Garden Club of Honolulu. They also will take a plane trip to the outer islands of Hawaii and Maui and on May 11 will fly to Tokyo.

Highlights of their two-week stay in Japan will be a trip to the Imperial Palace as guests of the Crown Prince and Princess, a three-day visit to Kyoto, and a reception to be given by the Prime Minister for members of the Garden Club of America.

1961 Barbara Tracy Sandford Archives from the GCA trip to Hawaii and Japan

The following documents contain photos of menus, vintage postcards, letters, books on Ikebana and much more from Barbara's trip in April through May 1961 to Hawaii and Japan. Barbara, and her dear friend Hazel Lockwood, were delegates to the Garden Club of America's annual meeting in Hawaii. An optional trip to Japan was added on after the meeting. Barbara had described this trip as one of the most fantastic experiences in her life.

1961 Barbara Tracy Sandford photographs from Japan

1961 Barbara Tracy Sandford trip to Hawaii and Japan: PART 1

1961 Barbara Tracy Sandford trip to Hawaii and Japan: PART 2

1961 Barbara Tracy Sandford trip to Hawaii and Japan: PART 3

1961 Barbara Tracy Sandford trip to Hawaii and Japan: PART 4

1961 GCA Japan Trip Itinerary and letter from Mrs. James E. Bovaird


February 7, 2014

From: susan ehrenkranz <susan.ehrenkranz@gmail.com>
Subject: Thank you
Date: February 7, 2014 7:25:09 AM EST
To: kentmary@me.com, SUSAN FRASER <Susan.King.Fraser@gmail.com>

Dear Susan and Mary,

A much delayed thank you for the marvelous treasure trove the Plainfield Garden Club has presented to the Garden Club of America. Barbara Tracy Sanford's collection of memorabilia from her GCA trip to Hawaii and Japan is a valuable record of an exciting time and place of our organization. We are so fortunate that you recognized this - we are simply delighted to have it in our collection.

We are planning to arrange Mrs. Sanford's photos, menus and other ephemera in the Headquarters' display cabinet. I'll let you know when that happens and will be sure to send you a photo to share with your club.

I hope you are both managing to make it through the snow and ice in what seems like an extraordinarily long winter. Please extend sincere thanks from the GCA Archives to the members of your club for your far-sighted thoughtfulness and generosity.

Warm regards,

Susan Ehrenkranz
GCA Chairman of Archives

To view the memorabilia, see: Barbara Tracy Sandford '50

1961 GCA Trip to Hawaii and Japan, Barbara Sandford and Hazel Lockwood

Japan
Barbara Sandford far left

1961 GCA Trip to Hawaii and Japan, Barbara Sandford and Hazel Lockwood

Japan
Barbara Sandford top right in dark dress

1961 GCA Trip to Hawaii and Japan, Barbara Sandford and Hazel Lockwood

Japan
Barbara Sandford on the gentleman's left, holding fur

1961 GCA Trip to Hawaii and Japan, Barbara Sandford and Hazel Lockwood

Japan
Barbara Sandford disembarking the bus

1961 GCA Trip to Hawaii and Japan, Barbara Sandford and Hazel Lockwood

Japan
Barbara lower left holding white purse

1961 GCA Trip to Hawaii and Japan, Barbara Sandford and Hazel Lockwood

Japan
Barbara Sandford far left

1961 GCA Trip to Hawaii and Japan, Barbara Sandford and Hazel Lockwood

Japan
Barbara Sandford center holding movie camera

May 26, 1961

June 15, 1961

June 15, 1961

May 21, 1959

June 14, 1961 Meeting Minutes

The Plainfield Garden Club met today June 14th for a picnic at the home of Mrs. Robert T. Stevens on Woodland Avenue.

After the business meeting Mrs. Webster Sandford, pres. and Mrs. Frederick M. Lockwood, program chairman, reported on the annual meeting of The Garden Club of America, which they attended recently in Honolulu, Hawaii.

They showed slides and movies of the Islands of Maui and Hawaii and then told the Club of their further visit to Japan where for two weeks with other members of the Garden Club of America, they were guests of the Japanese American Society.

Receptions for groups were given at, The Akasaka Detached Palace in Toyko where they were received by the Crown Prince and Princes; at the Prime Minister's Official Residence by Foreign Minister and Mrs. Zentaso Kosaka, and at the American Embassy by Ambassador and Mrs. Edwin O. Reischaur.

Formal dinners were given by the The American-Japan Society, Society for International Cultural Relations, and the Japan Tourist Association at the Imperial Hotel in Toyko and in Osaka by the Governor of Osaka Prefecture, Mayor of Osaka, President of Osaka Chamber of Commerce & Industry, and the President of America-Japan Society.

Mrs. Sandford and Mrs. Lockwood showed pictures of the three garden parties they attended. Mr. and Mrs. Shojiro Ishibashi, President of Japan Landscape Architets, garden The Nomura Garden and at Oiso, former Prime Minister, Shirgeru Yoshida, now Chairman of the Welcome Committee of Japan, received them with this messafe of welcome. "The doors of our hearts and gardens are opened without reserve for your full enjoyment. It is our ernest hope that you will throughly enjoy the scenic beauties of our land and the spirit of fellowship and hospitality of our people."

Special performances in their honor were given at, The Imperial Palace Musci Hall to see the Geisha girls dance the famous Cherry Dance as guests of the Mayor of Keyto and at Senke Kaikan Hall, the traditional Tea Ceremony. Gifts from all these people and places were displayed on a bright red Japanese banner for the Club to help illustrate bring to life this most unusual trip.

Notebook marked "Japan"

Contains descriptions of perhaps slides that have yet to be found.

Mote & wall of Imperial Palace in Toyko

Mrs. Oso and Hazel at lunch given by Gov. and Mrs. Azure (?) at Chingan-so Restaurant used to be private
Country folk dances for our pleasure

These are girls in regular Japanese Theater. All actors are men.

Women buying oranges at streetside market

Police escort of our seven buses

Pool & Tea house at Mr. Ishibashi
Pres. of Japan Landscape Comm.
Mrs. Arais
Sambeien Garden – Yokohana and farm house with bamboo tal??

Great Bronze Buddha at Kamakura
Incense burner

Oiso
Clematis & rose garden of former Prime Minister Yosheida – now the real head of political Japan

Golden Camp - red banners

View from hotel window in Miyan – Osh-ita - tile rooftops

Train ride to Nagoya

Nagara River at Gifu for Cormor?? Fishing

Welcome luncheon at Hashokan by Governor & Mayors of Najoya Tea Company

Nagoya Castile & moat

Deer ??? in at Nara
Fountain for ??? hands & mouth before going into Horyinja Shrine Worlds oldest wooden buddha

George Robinson & Mr. Smith who was sent to cover our trip & reactions for the State Department

Todaiji Temple housing colossal bronze image of Buddha

Kasuja Shrine – temple of lanterns – 3000– given as memorial gifts
Oldest Cryptomeria tree

Green tea covered with bamboo mats as shelter

Goldfish store at streetside

Hawaii - April 26

The world from the air
Denver
Bryce Canyon

Hawaiian Village - hotel was built by Henry Kaiser
True Hawaiians who modeled costumes from the museum formally worn by queens

Diamond Hill house and garden tour

Begonia court

View of Honolulu & Diamond Head from gardens

Monkey Pod and Jacaranda Tree
Chinese Garden

Courtyard by tea house
orchids at Mrs. Walkers on trip of Oahu day

Japanese dry garden. Raked sand take the place of water.
1st reg?? garden – too busy

plant

Royal palms at Dilling ?? houses – several place where had a picnic.
Orijjanal missionary house brought board by board from Conn.

Pineapples

View at breakfast from Moana terrace
Lava coast line

Maui – beach where tidal wave came in
Wet rugged mountains

Largest banyan tree in the world
Dillingham ?? ancestral homes 1717

Lahania Molichaki

flying from Maui to Hawaii

Creator of Mona Kela

Creator of Mona loa
Hanging baskets
rainbow art Hilo from Naualoa Hotel

Rainbow waterfall

Black lava beach ast Mt. Shipaua ??

Beefsteak plant – also bus limousine
Millet pond – used to be home of one of the Hawaiian kings

Crater of Hale mau mau from Volcano House

Conservation meeting of G.C.A. was on eruption of Hale in 1959

Black Sand beach

1958 Check Book

No. 1332
Dec. 16, 1958
Barbara Sandford
$87.46

May 17, 1957 Club Commemorates Founding of Iris Garden

Caption: GARDEN MARKER VIEWED – Standing before the marker commemorating the 25th anniversary of the Iris Garden in Cedar Brook Park are (left to right) Mrs. Frederick Lockwood, Victor B. King, Jr., John C. Wister, Mr. Richard Tracy and Miss Harriette R. Halloway, founder of this garden. (Courier photo by E. T. Wiggins)

The Plainfield Garden Club and guests yersterday dedicated the the entranceway of the of the Iris Garden in Cedar Brook Park.

Miss Harriette R. Halloway, found of the garden and chairman of the garden of the Iris Garden [not legible] the project was started in 1932, was presented a medal by Mrs. Frederick M. Lockwood, president of the Garden Club.

The medal is [not legible] "from the grateful members of the Plainfield Garden Club Harriette R. Halloway founder and director of the Iris gardens of Cedar Brook Park, Plainfield, 1932 - 1957."

[Not legible] viewed a recently installed [not legible] tablet marking the anniversary of the garden.

"Excercise in Perfection"
Victor R. King, president of the Union County Park Commission, led the gathering [not legible] the garden display was "an excercise in perfection is [not legible]," he said.

The park commission provides the setting for the garden and have [not legible] in the project [not legible]

W. [not legible] Tracy, executive had of the Park Commission when the Iris Garden was started paid tribute to Miss Halloway for her "tireless work and painstaking effort."

Another speaker was Dr. John C. Wister of Swarthmore, Pa., president of the American Iris Society when the garden was started and author of [not legible] article about the garden in the current issue of the Journal of the New York Botanical Gardens.

Miss Halloway spoke briefly and [not legible] on the work of the [not legible] who care for the Iris Garden. She introduced Kenneth Smith, one of the largest contributors of plants to the garden [not legible]

Mrs. Lockwood presided at the program. Guests included members of [not legible] garden clubs and contributors to the garden.

The Iris Garden Committee includes Mrs. Morris E. Benton, Mrs. Alden de Hart, Mrs. Lockwood, Mrs. Donald E. Luce, Mrs. William K. Dunbar, Jr., Mrs. C. Northrop Pond, Mrs. Webster Sandford, Mrs. Arthur D. Seybold, Mrs. John R. Wells, Mrs. Willian G. Wigton, Mrs. Robert MacLeod, vice chairman, and Miss Halloway, chairman.

Special slides [not legible] for the chairman were Mrs. Charles A. Eaton, Jr., Mrs. F. Willoughby Frost ad Mrs. Edwin M. Treat, Jr.

Mrs. Victor M. King was chairman of the special committee assisted by Mrs. J. Harold Loizeaux, Mrs. E. B. Newberry, and Miss Margaret Tyler. Also cooperating were Mrs. N. C. Barnhart, Jr., Mrs. William P. Elliott, Mrs. Homer Cochran and Mrs. H. I. Flanders.

Hostesses (not legible)
Other hostesses were Mrs. William W. Coriell, Mrs. Leslie E. Fort, Mrs. William A. Holliday, Mrs. Richard M. Lawton, Mrs. Robert T. Stevens, Mrs. C. Boardman Tyler, Mrs. William S. Tyler. Mrs. Thomas Van Boskerck and Mrs. Orville G. Waring.

The Iris Garden now has more than 1,800 named varieties properly labeled, representing all types of Iris and totaling more than 75,000 plants.

The main part of the garden is [not legible] caring Iris [not legible] and is expected to be is good blooms thorugh the rest of the month.

Introduction in Rhyme and Skit for Garden Club Meeting May 1956 by Marge Elliott

Introduction

Imagine that you are our garden club
type here the powers that be
What things go on in a garden club
you'll be surprised to see

The cast are famous actresses
All brought at great expense
So please be kind to others, my friends
Lest they should take offense.

The President's name is Hazel
And its Lockwood – thats for sure
She presides as "to-the-manner-born"
But her arrangements – they are poor.

Elizabeth King of Programs – She's
all fluttering, cooing and coy.
To find the right speaker for just the right day
Is her constant delight and her joy.

Introduction in Rhyme of Skit for Garden Club Meeting May 1956 by Marge Elliott

Hospitality chairman is Barbara
Sandford's the rest of her name
She's very smart but sarcastic
the "country tweed type" is this dame.

Conservation is Anne Marie Seybold
She is a lady who knows what is what
She has no time for the frivilous
In her ways she's terribly sot.

Abie Mooney – our wonderful speaker
Rosa Bunda – she has quite a past
And now you know all that you need to
about our illustrious cast.

So please let the music be quiet
I see the house lights are low
Put on the fools and the spotlights
All right – curtain ready? Let's go!

Introduction in Rhyme and Skit for Garden Club Meeting May 1956 by Marge Elliott

Page 2

Ways and Means Chairman is Shirley
Bernhart we're meaning of course
She's breathless, naive and appealing
But hasn't the sense of a horse.

Marrion Loizeaux is chairman
of membership – looks la-de-da
But don't let that big hat delude you
She's a great one for making faux pas.

Fanny Day has charge of the minutes
Madame Secretary – no less –
But I must in confidence tell you
All her reports are a mess.

Heely – that's Polly the Treasurer
Does weird things to the books
She was never good at her figures
And so for the balance – gad - zooks!

Introduction in Rhyme of Skit for Garden Club Meeting May 1956 by Marge Elliott

December 8, 1955

OUCH! Mrs. Homer Cochran (left), treasurer of the Plainfield Garden Club, yells "Ouch!" as she sticks her finger while making wreaths in the home of Mrs. Linden Stuart Jr., 980 Hillside Ave., for Lyons Hospital. Others (left to right) are Mrs. F. N. Lockwood, first vice president; Mrs. Webster Sandford, chairman; Mrs. Robert I. Stevens, wife of the former Army secretary; and Mrs. John S. Anderegg, co-chairman

December 8, 1955 Mrs. Webster Sandford

Plainfield Library Archive

1954

GARDEN CLUB TO HOLD FAIR – Mrs. Webster Sandford, special events chairman, sets marker for display of the Plainfield Garden Club Fair May 14-15 at Crescent and Park Aves. Looking on (left to right) are Mrs. Edward H. Ladd, windowbox arrangements; Mrs. H. I. Flanders, plant materical chairman; Mrs. Victor King, club president, and Mrs. Morris F. Benton, fair chairman.

1954 Mrs. Webster Sandford

1954 - 1970 296 Images from Plainfield Library Scrapbook

April 16, 1954

April 16, 1954

1949-1950 Program

This small brochure was found in the bottom of a box belonging to Barbara Tracy Sandford '50. It may have been one of the first things given to Barbara when she joined as a Junior Member of the Club in 1950.

12/22/13

1949-1950 Program

Sunday, June 26, 1938 The Cleveland Plain Dealer

Sunday, June 26, 1938 The Cleveland Plain Dealer

Sunday, June 26, 1938 The Cleveland Plain Dealer

Webster Sandford

Found next to the 1938 Cleveland Plain Dealer wedding announcement in Barbara's memorabilia. A Club member speculated that this was taken in Wolfeboro.

Residence of Mrs. Frederick Sandford, 112 Sycamore

In this illustrated book, the Courier-News has sought to present some of the representative homes of The Plainfields and adjoining territory, together with such other buildings of interest and importance as would serve to convey an idea of the physical attractioins of one of the most beautiful and healthful cities in the Metropolitan District. The homes reflect the desirability of this community as a place of residence.

The churches, schools, clubs and public buildings pictured serve to give the stranger some conceptions of the beauty of the city and its right to be termed the "Queen City" of New Jersey.

With picturesque Watchung Hills as a background, this section with all its natural advantages, plus a progressive spirit, coupled with high class local governing bodies and a live Chamber of Commerce, is pecularily adapted for home sites and, as a result, it has enjoyed a steady and healthy growth for many years.


publication circa 1917

January 02, 1938 New York Times

TROTH ANNOUNCED OF BARBARA TRACY; Cleveland Girl's Engagement to Webster Sandford Made Known at a Reception SPRING NUPTIALS PLANNED Bridegroom-Elect, an Attorney with a New York Firm, Was Graduated From Harvard

Mr. and Mrs. James Jared Tracy gave a reception today at their home in Shaker Heights, at which they announced the engagement of their daughter, Miss Barbara Tracy, to Webster Sandford, son of Mrs. Joseph Webster Sandford of Plainfield, N. J., and the late Mr. Sandford.

December 05, 1931 Harvard

HARVARD, OXFORD TO MEET TONIGHT IN FOURTH DEBATE
British Company Makes Last-Minute Refusal to Carry Speeches–Good Weather Conditions Forecast
NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED
December 05, 1931

Broadcasting from stations in England and America, members of the Harvard Debating Council and The Oxford Union will stage the first transoceanic meet in the history of debating. It comes as something of a surprise that the speeches will not be heard in England owing to the policy of the British Broadcasting Company, the sole authorized radio agency in the country, of refusing to broadcast controversial subjects.

The debate will be preceded by a talk from New York by James W. Gerard, war-time ambassador to Germany. The National Broadcasting Company, which is bearing the entire costs of this debate, estimated at $35,000, will cooperate with the English company in transmitting the speeches.

"Cancellation of Debts"

The subject of the debate: "Resolved, That, in the interests of world prosperity, the war debts should be cancelled," selected by G. W. Wickersham, former United States Attorney General, and now chairman of President Hoover's Law Enforcement Commission, will be opened by A. J. Irvine of Oriel College, Oxford, speaking for the affirmative. The negative side of the question, will be upheld by the next speaker, P. C. Reardon '32. To obviate the additional expense of shifting back and forth between speeches, and to accord with the split-argument nature of the debate, the next talker will be a Harvard man, D. M. Sullivan '33, who will support the affirmative. The last prepared speech will come from England, when E. D. O'Brien of Exeter College, gives a negative argument. These talks will last about nine minutes each.

Two rebuttal speeches will end the debate, each one covering five minutes. P. H. Cohen '32, will sum up the negative arguments of the Harvard and Ox- gium.

Arthur Willing Patterson, of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Eugene Edwin Record, of Brookline.
William Barry Wood, Jr., of Milton.
For Treasurer
Joseph Rawson Collins, of Cincinnati, Ohio.
Alexander Cochrane Forbes, of Wellesley.
Peter Morton Whitman, of Katonah, New York.
For Orator
Frederick Charles Fiechter, Jr., of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Augustin Hamilton Parker, Jr., of Charles River.
Paul Cashman Reardon, of Quincy.
Frederick Fessenden Wilder, of Brookline.
For Chorister
David Dodge Boyden, of Boylston.
Robert Ulrich Jameson, of Grand Rapids, Michigan.
Geoffrey Whitney Lewis, of Brookline.
For Ivy Orator
Joseph Wright Alsop, Jr., of Avon, Connecticut.
Loftus Eugene Becker, of Tonawanda, New York.
Budd Emile Pollak, of New York, New York.
For Poet
George Caspar Homans, of Boston.
Eiting Elmore Morison, of Peterberough, New Hampshire.
For Odist
James Rufus Agee, of Rockland, Maine. Donald Bruce Edmonston, of Winthrop. Stanislaus Pascal Franchet, of Boston.
For Senior Class Album Committee
James Sherman Barker, of Dorchester. Rene Cheronnet Champellion, of Newport, New Hampshire.
Richard Norman Clark, Jr., of Atlanta, Georgia.
Crispin Cooke, of Buffalo, New York.
Ethelbert Talbot Donaldson, of Tuckahoe, New York.
Alexander Graham Bell Fairchild, of Miami, Florida.
John Sleeper Hartwell, of Bronxville, New York.
John Howland, of Quincy.
Eliot Fette Noyes, of Cambridge.
Joseph Webster Sandford, Jr., of Plain-field, New Jersey

1920 Muhlenberg Hospital Womens Auxiliary

Mrs. J. W. Sandford
433 Stelle Avenue

1909 Plainfield Directory

Sandford, Joseph W, real estate, h 530 W 7th

1909 Plainfield Directory

Plainfield CC

http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=F70C12FC3A5414728DDDA10994D0405B818CF1D3

New York Times August 18, 1901

CUP GOLF AT PLAINFIELD

Results of Weekly Marches at Hillside and Park Clubs.

PLAINFIELD, N. J. Aug. 17 – Notwithstanding the warm weather, there was a good attendance at the links of the Hillside Golf Club today. In the contest for the Mellick Cup, played this morning, Miss Maude Van Boskerck carried off the honors, the scores being: Miss Maude Van Boskerck 116, 12 - 104; Miss Herwarden, 110, 4 - 106, Miss May Holly, 137, 30 - 107; Miss May Wharton, 150, 35 - 115; Miss Louise Holly, 172, 25 - 137.

In the play for the Golf Committee Cup on the Hillside links, T. R. Van Boskerck led W. L. Glenny today by three points. The scores were: T. R. Van Boskerck, 92, 12 - 80; W. L. Glenny, 88 6 - 83; Walter Peterson, 99, 15 - 84; W. C. Faber, III, 27 -84; C. W. Abbott, 94, 8 - 86; C. A. Stevenson, 116, 24 - 92; C. C. Burke, Jr., 111, 19 - 92; E. W. Hedges, 115, 22-93; J. W. Sandford, 107, 13 -94; E. W. Newkirk, 122, 27 - 95; H. C. Tracey, 123, 17 - 96; L. H. Van Buren, 113, 15 - 98; J. R. Blake, 118, 18 -100; H. C. Munger, 114, 12 - 102; R. Rushmore, 127, 20 -107.

There was a comparatively small field in the weekly competition for the President's Cup at the Park Golf Club, and first and second honors went to Joseph L. Myers and Charles L. Nichols, respectively, who are newcomers in the race, while Charles B. Morse took third place. Senator Charles A. Reed still leads for the trophy.

The score cards better than 100 were: Joseph L. Myers, 117, 30 - 87; Charles L. Nichols, 119, 30 - 80; Charles B. Morse, 107, 15 - 92; William R. Faber, 113, 21 - 97; H. G. Phillips, 124, 25 - 90; Henry C. Wells, 118, 19 - 99.

November 2, 1894 New York Times

http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=F00917F63A5515738DDDAB0894D9415B8485F0D3

Sanford - Murray

PLAINFIELD, N.J., Nov. 1 – There was a brilliant wedding in the Crescent Avenue Presbyterian Church at 7:30 o'clock this evening, when Miss Minnie Breckenridge Murray, daughter of John W. Murray of the German Insurance Company of New York, was married to Joseph Webster Sanford, Jr., son of Joseph W. Sanford of Westervelt Avenue. A large assemblage of society people witnessed the event. The Rev. Dr. William R. Richards, pastor of the church, performed the ceremony. The church was elaborately decorated with palms and chrysanthemums.

The bride wore a handsome gown of white corded silk, and carried a bouquet of beautiful roses. The maid of honor was Miss Augusta Knox Murray. The bridesmaids were Miss Stella Place, Miss May Sanford, and Miss May Murray of Plainfield, and Miss Grace Brewster of New York. Albert Arthur Tilney was best man. The ushers were Percy H. Stewart, George S. Beebe, Howard W. Beebe, Fred W. Walz, Walter F. Murray, and James E. Murray. A reception followed a the home of the bride's parents.

November 2, 1894 New York Times

Sanford - Murray

PLAINFIELD, N.J., Nov. 1 – There was a brilliant wedding in the Crescent Avenue Presbyterian Church at 7:30 o'clock this evening, when Miss Minnie Breckinridge Murray, daughter of John W. Murray of the German Insurance Company of New York, was married to Joseph Webster Sandford, Jr., son of Joseph W. Sanford of Westervelt Avenue. A large assemblage of society people witnessed the event. The Rev. Dr. William R. Richards, pastor of the church, performed the ceremony. The church was elaborately decorated with palms and chyrsanthemums.

The bride wore a handsome gown of white corded silk and carried a bouquet of beautiful roses. The maid of honor was Miss Augusta Knox Murray. The bridesmaids were Miss Stella Place, Miss May Sanford, and Miss May Grace Brewster of New York. Albert Tilney was best man. The ushers were Percy H. Stewart, George S. Beebe, Howard W. Beebe, Fred W. Walz, Walter F. Murray, and James E. Murray. A reception followed at the home of the bride's parents.

October 21, 1894 New York Times

Cards of invitation have been issued to the marriage of Miss Minne Breckenridge Murray, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John W. Murray of Central Avenue, to Joseph Webster Sandford, Jr., of West Seventh Street, on Thursday evening, Nov. 1, at 7:30 o'clock, in the Crescent Avenue Presbyterian Church.

1275 Denmark Road

Bliss Hall, James Jared Tracy House, Millionaires Row, Cleveland

Description Once part of "Millionaires' Row" along Euclid Ave., the James Jared Tracy house was renamed "Bliss Hall" and used as a women's dormitory, 1943-1951. It was named in honor of Loretta Bliss who contributed for the furnishings. The house was razed in 1951 to make way for a parking lot.
Subject Fenn College
Bliss Hall
Dormitories
Euclid Avenue (Cleveland, Ohio)
Cleveland State University
Location Depicted Cleveland (Ohio)
Collection Cleveland State University Archives Photograph Collection

Bliss Hall, First Floor Living Area

Bliss Hall, Dining Room

Bliss Hall, First Floor Living Area

Bliss Hall, First Floor Living Area

Bliss Hall, First Floor Living Area

Bliss Hall, Bedroom

Bliss Hall, Bedroom

Bliss Hall, James Jared Tracy House on Millionaire's Row, Cleveland

America's Successful Men of Affairs, The United States at Large 1896

Barbara's grandfather, James Jared Tracy

JAMES JARED TRACY, financier, Cleveland, O., is a descendant, through the line of his mother, Catharine Lansing, from early colonists, emigrants from Holland, who founded the village of Lansingburgh, N.Y. His father's ancestors were English people, who settled in Norwich, Conn., in 1642. Gardiner Tracy, the father, was a very intelligent and able man, originally a printer and bookseller, who published The Lansingburgh Gazette, 1800-26, and The Western Recorder in Utica, N.Y., 1826 - 40, and for many years was a member of the New York Legislature. James J. Tracy was born in Lansingburgh, Dec. 3, 1819, and attended school mainly in Utica. At the early age of fourteen, he went to work in a wholesale dry goods store in Utica and two years later was sent to Cleveland, where for fifteen years he was prosperously employed in banking. On account of ill health, he then gave up banking, and has since been occupied with the management and improvement of real estate in Cleveland, but has other interests, especially in the factories of the city, and was vice president of The Brush Electric Co., until that concern was sold to The Thomson-Houston Electric Co. He is now vice president of The Society for Savings and, while never in political office, is one of the two surviving original trustees of The Case School of Applied Science. Mr. Tracy is an ardent Republican in politics and in private life an original member both of the Ark, a club formed in 1840, and of the Union club. April 25, 1883, he married Jane A., daughter of George Foote of Detroit, Mich., and has two children, James Jared and Catharine Lansing Tracy.

1894 Western Reserve Historical Society

Barbara's father, James J. Tracy, was a neighbor to John D. Rockefeller, on Millionaire's Row, Euclid Avenue, Cleveland. They were also both patrons of the Historical Society.

Foote Family Genealogy 1907

JANE ALLYN, b. Detroit, Mich., Nov. 8, 1857; m. Fortress Monroe, Va., Apr. 25, 1883, James Jared, son of Gardiner Tracy. He was b. Lansingburg, N. Y., Dec. 3, 1819. She was educated at the Detroit Seminary and Cleveland Seminary. Res., 3535 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, O. James Jared Tracy was b. in Lansingburg, N. Y., Dec. 3, 1819. His father was for many years a printer and published at Lansingburg, editing the "Lansingburg Gazette" for many years. IN 1825 the family moved to Utica, N. Y., where he lived until his death. James J. received a common school education, and at the arly age of 14 began to earn his own living. He moved to Cleveland at the age of 15 (1836) when it was a village of less than 5,000. He has lived in Cleveland all these years, amassing, by careful attention to business, a comfortable fortune. He is hale and hearty at the age of 87 years, attending daily to his business affairs. He was 63 years old before marrying for the first time, and his wife was many years his junior. His son is now a Senior at Harvard College, and expects, after taking a mechanical engineering course at Harvard, to return and make his home in Cleveland. His dau. is at school in Bryn Mawr, Pa. Ch: (1) James Jared Tracy, Jr., b. Feb. 27, 1884. (2) Catharine Lancing Tracy, b. Feb. 20, 1888.

Millionare's Row, Euclid Avenue, Cleveland

A. John D. Rockefeller, 3920 Euclid Avenue
B. James Jared Tracy, 3535 Euclid Avenue

John D. Rockefeller's House, 3920 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland

September 18, 2013 Barbara Remembered at the Presidents Council Meeting

September 18, 2013 Meeting Minutes from the GCA Zone IV Presidents Council Meeting in New York

New York Times May 13, 1914

FREDERICK SANDFORD, 48 years old, died on Monday at his home, 112 Sycamore Street, North Plainfield. Mr. Sandford was one of the owners of the Watchung Spring Water Company. He had just returned from Florida, where he spent the Winter. Mr. Sandford was a member of the B.P.O.E. of Plainfield. He is survived by his widow.

October 14, 2013 Email Exchange with Sally Solmssen, New Jersey Committee of the GCA

Plainfield Garden Club <plainfieldgc@gmail.com>
Oct 6 (8 days ago)

to CHILX1
Dear Sally,

Congratulations on putting together a wonderful meeting this week with Margaret Roach and Marty Van Allen. I truly learned a lot. As usual, I took some pictures and put together a little virtual memory book for the Plainfield Garden Club members that could not be present. Here is the link in case you are interested:

Margaret Roach and Marty Van Allen star at the New Jersey Committee Fundraiser

I also really enjoyed viewing the portion of Rumson's Centennial Celebration video with Millicent Johnsen. What a fascinating story about the Fresnel Lens. As you probably know, the same week that Millicent passed away we also lost our dear Barbara Sandford who was one of the founding members of the New Jersey Committee. She was thrilled this past February when the article was published in the Bulletin about the Committee and very proud her name was listed.

In case you are not aware, we have put together an online album of Barbara's huge accomplishments both within the PGC and the GCA. Included is that page of the Bulletin. Barbara's family has been most appreciative of this online tribute. If interested, you can read it at this link:

Mrs. Webster (Barbara Tracy) Sandford '50

Thank you again for all you do.

Sincerely,

Susan Fraser
co-President

Plainfield Garden Club
Founded 1915
www.plainfieldgardenclub.org


chilx1@comcast.net
9:38 AM (21 minutes ago)

to me
Dear Susan,
Thank you so much for your email. I've had no email service for a few days and am finally able to check out Plainfield's website. The NJ Committee extensive coverage is fantastic! I will pass the link on to our committee. I am glad you enjoyed the day and reported to your club about it.

I was so pleased to see Barbara Sanford's album. She was one great lady and a favorite of mine. When I was Zone Chair quite a few years ago, she called me about Scenic America which I joined and tried to publicize. I often ask people if they know the 4 US states that have no billboards; they usually don't unless they live in Alaska, Hawaii, VT or Maine. Recently, I saw that they had a beautiful write up on Barbara as a founder.

The Plainfield site is so amazing; we should have a Zone IV workshop, so we can try to emulate you.
Best,
Sally

October 30, 2013

When you are a member of the PGC for 63 years, you are bound to collect a few garden club-related items. And this is very true of Barbara. The Barbara Tracy Sandford Archives – Step 1

October 30, 2013 1275 Denmark

Plaque outside the front door

October 30, 2013 1275 Denmark

1930 New Jersey Roadside Council sign in the basement

October 30, 2013 1275 Denmark

The "Beautification" bookshelf in the basement

October 30, 2013 1275 Denmark

Sign on the wall in the basement

October 30, 2013 1275 Denmark

File cabinet in the basement

October 30, 2013 1275 Denmark

Barbara's grow lights and other garden stuff in the basement.

October 30, 2013 1275 Denmark

Barbara's prized Franklinia tree from Bartram's Garden in Philadelphia.

October 30, 2013 1275 Denmark

Barbara's Franklinia

November 14, 2013

Coming down the kitchen steps as you look left you see the sweet playhouse or summer house beyond the brick circle garden.

Today would have been Barbara's 95th birthday.

November 14, 2013

Many a garden club party was held in the center of the brick wall circle garden with fountain. (And no doubt a few skits!) Note the gorgeous red Japanese Maple – perhaps planted by Barbara in fond remembrance of her 1961 trip to Japan.

November 20, 2013: Tucker Trimble remembers Barbara telling her that when the brick circle garden was built, Evie Madsen stood on the wall to give her report during one of the Club's meetings.

November 14, 2013

The inside of the brick circle are borders with scalloped edges in old brick.

November 14, 2013

Note the interesting design of the focal point fountain.

November 14, 2013

Looking back at the house

November 14, 2013

November 14, 2013

The "bottom" of the garden has curving secret paths that lead to different spaces and ornaments. The entire garden is tiered – the side lawn, leading to the brick wall circle garden and then another tier to the bottom garden. This may have been where childhood friends of the Sandford children had their pretend weddings & many fond memories.

November 14, 2013

Beautiful moss-covered stone steps offers another way down to the secret garden. There are several steps like these. The bones of the garden point to a well trained designer and are reminiscent of Lucy Van Boskerck's garden at 1332 Prospect Avenue These gardens were supposedly designed by the Olmsted Brothers Landscape Architecture firm in Brookline, Mass. The Olmsted firm designed the Shakespeare Garden in Cedar Brook Park as will as Mrs. Jared Tracy's, Barbara's mother, gardens in New Hampshire.

November 20, 2013: Sally Genung Booth said she can remember when these gardens were put in. She thinks the '60's or the '70's. She said the garden was a gift from Webster to Barbara.

November 14, 2013

A pretty , multi-tiered pond at the bottom of the garden.

November 14, 2013

November 14, 2013

The long winding grassy path along the back of the property. Leads you through an opening in a very pretty lattice fence.

November 14, 2013

Another large stone revealed. How much fun would it have been to run along these "trails" and play within these still-pretty planting beds.

November 14, 2013

The carriage house/garage with hay loft door.

November 14, 2013

The entrance into the historic neighborhood and the back of Barbara's house.

September 17, 2007 Frank R. Carvell

Monday, September 17, 2007

Memorial services for Frank R. Carvell, Sr., 92, of Paducah will be held 11 am Tuesday at Grace Episcopal Church. Reverends Tim Taylor and Elizabeth Wade will officiate. Burial will follow in the Grace Episcopal Church Memorial Garden.

Frank was born in Cleveland, Ohio on December 15, 1914 to the late Dr. Frank R. Carvell and Georgina Fisher Carvell Cochran. He was a 1932 graduate of Collingwood High School in Cleveland and a 1936 graduate of Case Institute of Technology (Case-Western Reserve University) in Cleveland, where he also completed his post graduate work in Chemical Engineering. Prior to the outbreak of World War II, he was a member of the United States Coast Guard and Naval Reserve.

He was a chemical engineer for Brush Laboratories in Cleveland as well as for B.F. Goodrich Chemical Company, working at their tire, chemical and rocket fuel plants in Akron, Cleveland, and Avon Lake, Ohio as well as Rialto, California and Calvert City, Ky. He was a member of the American Chemical Society, a longtime member of the Paducah Housing Authority and following retirement, the Service Corp of Retired Executives.

He was a member of the congregation of Grace Episcopal Church in Paducah where, over the years, he served on the church vestry in various capacities.

As a member of Paducah Country Club since 1993, he was a veracious golfer. He was also a supporter of youth sports and an avid fan of Paducah Tilghman High School football.

He is survived by his son, Frank Carvell, Jr. and wife Sharon of Paducah; daughter, Barbara Vargochic and husband Louis of Charlotte, North Carolina; four grandchildren, Trey Carvell and wife Heather of Wickliffe, Ky, Cynthia White and husband Scott of Kevil, and Matt and Ryan Vargochic of Charlotte, North Carolina; two great-grandchildren, Ann Tracy (Annie) White of Kevil and Saidee Karoline Carvell of Wickliffe. He is further survived by his housekeeper of many years, Mildred Walden of Paducah along with nieces, nephews, in-laws and many friends.

He was preceded in death by his wife, Ann Tracy Carvell and his parents, Dr. Frank R. Carvell and Georgina Fisher Carvell Cochran.

Memorial visitation will begin after 10 am Tuesday at the church.

The family would like to thank the caring efforts of Caring People Services, Lourdes Hospice, the 5th floor nurses and staff at Lourdes Hospital and Medco.

Memorial gifts may be made to Lourdes Hospice, PO Box 7100, Paducah, Ky 42002-7100 or Grace Episcopal Church, 820 Broadway, Paducah, Ky 42001.

Thank you note from Mrs. Fort

Only date: October 22nd best guess 1966 - 1973

Thank you note from Mrs. Fort

Thank you note from "Helen" with no date

Suspect this may be from Mrs. Miller circa 1974

Thank you note from "Helen" with no date

GCA Horticulture Award (front)

not dated (found with papers dating from the early '70's)

GCA Horticulture Award (back)

not dated

New Jersey Daffodil Society Second Place

Anemonella thalictriodes rue anemae

New Jersey Daffodil Society Third Place

Erythronium - Dogtooth Violet

Frelinghuysen Arboretum Harvest Show Third Place

Garden Club of America Zone IV Representative for Medal Award Committee

found in boxes late '70's - '80's

Minnie Murray Sandford

Minnie Murray Sandford's dress
c. late 1880's - 1890's
Given to Drake House November 2013 by the Sandford family

Minnie Murray Sandford

Minnie Murray Sandford's dress
c. late 1880's - 1890's
Given to Drake House November 2013 by the Sandford family

Other "Murray" relatives in the PGC include:
Joost, Mrs. Sherman Brownell (Marie Murray) '19
Murray, Mrs. James Everett (Alice Marshall) '20
Roome, Mrs. John Stanton (Dolores Murray or "Dody") '57
Rushmore, Mrs. Murray (Helen Joy)
Rushmore, Mrs. Townsend (Jean Betram Murray) '20
Tilney, Mrs. Albert Arthur (Augusta R. Murray) '20

Minnie Murray Sandford

Minnie Murray Sandford's dress
c. late 1880's - 1890's
Given to Drake House November 2013 by the Sandford family

Sampling of Barbara Tracy Sandford Archives 1965-1984

Sampling of Barbara Tracy Sandford Archives 1965-1984

The above 42-page pdf file contains a sampling of newspaper articles, correspondence and other documents from the memorabilia of Barbara Tracy Sandford. These items mostly pertain to the 1970's but there are some things from the late '60's and early '80's. Main topics include the Plainfield Beautification Committee/Annual Banquets; Plainfield Shade Tree Commission; Elmwood Garden Club; Children's Garden; New Jersey Garden Clubs; New Jersey Bell Labs; and correspondence within the civic government of Plainfield and Plainfield citizens at the time concerned with their environment.

For more information on this material please contact the Plainfield Public Library.

Calligraphy place card emblem DD Est. 1870

Stakes from the Plainfield Beautification Committee

Round signs for the Plainfield Beautification Committee

Willow Oak Tree Planting

Willow Oak Tree Planting

These photos were found in an envelope marked "Willow Oak Tree Planting" with no other information.

Plainfield Beautification Committee Photographs

1976-1984 Plainfield Beautification Committee Photographs

Plainfield Historical Society Memorabilia From the Archives of Barbara Tracy Sandford

This is a sampling of materials saved by Barbara Sandford in her "Plainfield Historical Society" file.

Plainfield Historical Society Memorabilia

Index (73 pages)

*Many mentions of Barbara throughout. Includes photos of her home in 1992; photos of her working at Drake House 1991; and a photo from 1968 with Charles Detwiller and Mrs. deHart.

Photos from the Archives of Barbara Tracy Sandford ca 1980's

Photos from the Archives of Barbara Tracy Sandford ca 1980's

These photos are of a floral design workshop held in Barbara's home, 1275 Denmark Road, conducted by PGC member Marge Elliott. One photograph shows Jeanette Morse, Anne Marie Seybold and Peg Brook.

Jeanne Turner writes the following:

3 ladies I knew fairly well... Lady on left is J Morse ( Jeannette)
I believe, who was a great friend of Barbara. If the deer were kind I still have a plant She gave me. Lady in middle is Anne Marie Seybold who use to tell us fascinating Stories of growing up in Germany in a time when her family were part of the Royal Connection..we saw each other every Thursday as we restored costumes in the tower Room at The Drake House. Lady on right was Peg Brook who at one time was Treasure at the Historical Society Of Plainfield and had a home near Barbara in Wolfeboro, NH.

Third Place Ribbon

First Place Ribbon

Picea Pendula

November 30, 2013 Florence Smith, Barbara Sandford and Plainfield's Trees

November 30, 2013

One PGC Member that we have not discussed at length is Mrs. Garret Smith who joined the Club in 1927. Mrs. Smith, a member of the PGC for 43 years, was a renowned horticulturalist with a radio program broadcast nationally twice a week. She designed the Garden Club of New Jersey's emblem, was an author and wrote many newspaper and magazine articles – always drawing on Plainfield for her examples.

This week, an article she wrote on trees in 1941, was discovered with Barbara Sandford's memorabilia. Barbara had saved this article no doubt as she assumed the role of Plainfield tree advocate when Mrs. Smith passed away in 1970. In this particular article, Mrs. Smith reports on the variety and rarity of the many trees in Plainfield. She explains why Plainfield has so many trees and why so many of them are special – because the early Plainfield residents were very enthusiastic gardeners.

Moving forward some 67 odd years, another Plainfield resident began to notice the interesting Plainfield trees. Greg Palermo kept a blog about his findings and it comes as no surprise that the greater percentage of trees he used for examples in his blog, were trees found in PGC members' gardens. (Since we had not yet opened our archives, it is doubtful that Mr. Palermo knew this.) His blog gives credence to Mrs. Smith's assertion that the early residents of Plainfield were keen botanists and tree-huggers.

And of course it must be noted, that the two chroniclers of Plainfield trees – one in 1941 and the other in 2008 – both knew Barbara Sandford.

January 2, 2014 Garden Club of America's ConWatch

We received the following email today:

Hi Susan,
Happy New Year!
I am just alerting you to the new issue of ConWatch. We did an article about both Barbara and Katchen Coley who passed away in the last few months. I hope the Plainfield members will be pleased with the tribute. The issue is online on the GCA website.
All best,
Elva


Click here to read the article: What a Difference One Person Can Make Click here for the pdf version of the article.

Elva is the 1st Vice Chair for the GCA Conservation Committee as well as an Affiliate member of the PGC. When Elva learned of Barbara's passing, she wrote in and said that Barbara had been one of her mentors. Barbara and Elva shared a passion to protect our environment as well as a shared love of the PGC! Thanks Elva for a beautiful memorial.

Garden Club of America In Memoriam

BARBARA TRACY SANDFORD
Plainfield Garden Club, Zone IV

Barbara Tracy Sandford passed away September 2, 2013 at the age of 94. Joining in 1950, Barbara's 63 years of membership is the longest on record for the Club. Elected Club President in 1960, Barbara traveled to Hawaii for the 1961 GCA Annual Meeting and Japan side trip. She described it as "one of the best experiences of her life" and her souvenirs from this historic trip will be displayed at Headquarters. Barbara served as Director of Zone IV (1986-1988) and was the recipient of the Medal of Merit (1972). In her costumed role as "Aunty Litter," Barbara humorously reminded all to recycle and beautify their surroundings. She won the Zone Civic Improvement Award (1985). Barbara is best remembered for her founding role of Scenic America. She was honored in 1999 with the Stafford Award for her "exceptional lifetime effort to control billboards and to protect our natural beauty."

NOTE:
Past Zone Directors are honored with a memorial read aloud at Garden Club of America headquarters in New York at the Zone Directors meeting. The current Zone Director reads the memorial written by the honoree's Club. The memorial is then forwarded to the GCA Bulletin Editor, where it will be published in the next Bulletin's edition. The memorial cannot be longer than 150 words.

The memorial was written by current Plainfield Garden Club co-President Susan Fraser. It was read at headquarters by current Zone IV Director Anne Gates the first week of March, 2014.

February 7, 2014 GCA Accepts Barbara Tracy Sandford 1961 Memorabilia

February 7, 2014

From: susan ehrenkranz <susan.ehrenkranz@gmail.com>
Subject: Thank you
Date: February 7, 2014 7:25:09 AM EST
To: kentmary@me.com, SUSAN FRASER <Susan.King.Fraser@gmail.com>

Dear Susan and Mary,

A much delayed thank you for the marvelous treasure trove the Plainfield Garden Club has presented to the Garden Club of America. Barbara Tracy Sanford's collection of memorabilia from her GCA trip to Hawaii and Japan is a valuable record of an exciting time and place of our organization. We are so fortunate that you recognized this - we are simply delighted to have it in our collection.

We are planning to arrange Mrs. Sanford's photos, menus and other ephemera in the Headquarters' display cabinet. I'll let you know when that happens and will be sure to send you a photo to share with your club.

I hope you are both managing to make it through the snow and ice in what seems like an extraordinarily long winter. Please extend sincere thanks from the GCA Archives to the members of your club for your far-sighted thoughtfulness and generosity.

Warm regards,

Susan Ehrenkranz
GCA Chairman of Archives

To view the memorabilia, see: Barbara Tracy Sandford '50

March 10, 2014 Women's History Month: Barbara Sandford

Friend of the Shakespeare Garden, local blogger Bernice Paglia, devotes her column on "Women's History Month" to Barbara Sandford. Bernice uses an image of Barbara that was discovered in the slides the Sandford family gave to the Club. It is an early photo of Barbara dressed as "Aunty Litter."


March 10, 2014

The Star-Ledger published this today in honor of Women's History Month: Vintage Photos of Women's History in NJ

The 9th photo in captures PGC Member Eva Hamilton Van Hoesen as she was one of the first of three women to sit on a jury in 1921.

One of the other women, Florance Runyon of Plainfield, wife of state Sen. William N. Runyon, is related to PGC President Mrs. Leslie Runyon (Helen Osmun) Fort '22.

Query how they were chosen? Like today, had they voted in 1920 (when women in NJ were allowed to vote) and therefor their names were entered in the jury pool?

One of the most famous US suffragists was Plainfielder Lillian Feickert. Not surprisingly, she does not seem to have any ties to the PGC. Although the Club boasts many forward-thinking women of their time, as us old-timers know, there were many that preferred "not to rock the boat."

An example would be PGC member Mrs. Sherman Brownell (Marie Murray) Joost '19, an "in-law" of Barbara Sandford. In March 1915 she wrote a very unfortunate letter to The New York Times stating that women should just tend to the housekeeping and let men deal with "the questions of the day." Even more shameful, she was President of the Plainfield Branch New Jersey Association Opposed to Woman Suffrage.

March 17, 2014 Mrs. Webster Sandford's Memorabilia From 1961 Trip to Hawaii & Japan

I thought you might like to see this photo of the display that is currently at the Garden Club of American Headquarters. It looks wonderful- and you are welcome to stop by and see it any time!

All best,

Susan Ehrenkranz
Chairman, GCA Archives

March 19, 2014 GCA Zone IV web page

GCA Zone IV Page on www.gcamerica.org

Link above to Barbara Sandford's IM and photograph on the Zone IV webpage of the GCA Website.

There is also a wonderful display at GCA Headquarters of Barbara's souvenirs of the GCA trip that she took to Japan many years ago. A Must See!


Anne Bigliani
GCA Zone IV Chairman

April 15, 2014 GCA Bulletin

Did everyone receive their GCA Bulletin? The PGC is once again well represented within this issue. Click here to read the excerpts.

You may wonder why the Audubon article was included . . . Mrs. Lucy Bakewell Audubon was the great-aunt of PGC member Euphemia Bakewell Brower '38. The Plainfield Library has two original Audubon prints that were gifted to the Library from the now defunct Ladies Home of Plainfield. It is your Editor's strong suspicion that the Ladies Home of Plainfield (which was founded by many PGC members) was gifted the prints from Mrs. Brower or other Audubon relatives living in Plainfield.

Davidson Descdendants

http://www.frontiernet.net/~ftmjohn/PDFFiles/Davidson.pdf

DAVIDSON DESCENDANT LINES
byJohn Hanrahan
This presents the descendant lines recorded in my database. Open the Bookmarks Tab to see my Ancestral lines. Pages tab will make it faster to get to a page. Index will provide a list of names with page numbers those names can be found.
DAVIDSON ANCESTRY
1 Descendants of James Davidson
*1 James Davidson b: in Berwick-upon-Tweed, Northumberland, England
.. +Mary Struther b: in Norman Scotland or Norham, Northumberland, England m: 09 September 1796 in Berwick-upon-
Tweed, Northumberland, England
... 2 William Davidson b: 27 May 1797 in Berwick-upon-Tweed, Northumberland, England
... 2 Eleanor Davidson b: 22 March 1799 in Berwick-upon-Tweed, Northumberland, England
....... +Cornelius S. Nesbit b: in Berwick-upon-Tweed, Northumberland, England m: Abt. 1836
........ 3 Eleanor Nesbit b: 1837 in Berwick-upon-Tweed, Northumberland, England d: 1926 York, England
... 2 Bridget Davidson b: 10 May 1801 in Berwick-upon-Tweed, Northumberland, England
... 2 Roger Davidson b: 20 August 1803 in Berwick-upon-Tweed, Northumberland, England d: Bef. 1806 Berwick-upon-
Tweed, Northumberland, England
... 2 George Davidson b: 14 July 1804 in Berwick-upon-Tweed, Northumberland, England
....... +Ann Struthers
*... 2 Roger Davidson b: 19 April 1806 in Berwick-upon-Tweed, Northumberland, England d: 11 May 1875 Plainfield, New
Jersey
....... +Jean Bertram b: 22 April 1808 in Parish of Stobo, Peebleshire, Scotland d: 06 April 1857 New York City, New York
m: Abt. 1830 in Berwick-on-Tweed, England
........ 3 James Davidson b: Bef. 1834 in Scotland
............ +Elsie Baverstock/Bavistock
........ 3 Elizabeth Davidson b: 05 February 1834 in Berwick-upon-Tweed, Northumberland, England d: 13 January 1912
New York City
............ +Stephen Eugene Kirby b: Abt. 1830 in New York City m: Abt. 1855 in Possibly New York
............. 4 Jean Bertram Kirby b: Abt. 1856 in New York
................. +Filley
............. 4 Frederick E. Kirby b: Abt. 1858 in New York
DAVIDSON ANCESTRY
2
Descendants of James Davidson
............. 4 Mary S. Kirby b: Abt. 1860 in New York
................. +Thomas J. Knowles
............. 4 John Kirby b: Bet. 1860 - 1870 in New York
........ 3 Mary Struthers Davidson b: 01 April 1835 in New York
............ +John W. Murray, Sr. b: Abt. 1835 in Scotland d: Bet. 1890 - 1900 Not listed on 1900 Census m: Abt. 1856 in
Probably in New York
............. 4 William D. Murray b: July 1858 in New York
................. +Mary b: October 1860 in New York m: Abt. 1893 in New York/New Jersey
............. 4 John W. Murray, Jr. b: November 1860 in New York
................. +Amelia b: October 1861 in Rhode Island m: Abt. 1882 in New York/New Jersey
............. 4 Jean Bertram Murray b: Abt. 1862 in New York
................. +Townshed Rushmore

............. 4 Roger F. Murray b: 06 December 1864 in New York d: Bet. 1922 - 1923
................. +Nettie M. Hetfield b: Abt. 1869 in New Jersey
............. 4 Augusta R Murray b: Abt. 1867 in New York
................. +A. A. Tilney

............. 4 Mary Stephens Murray b: Abt. 1869 in New Jersey
................. +Joseph W. Sandford

............. 4 James E. Murray b: Abt. 1871 in New Jersey
................. +Alice Marshall
............. 4 Walter L. Murray b: Abt. 1873 in New Jersey
DAVIDSON ANCESTRY
3
Descendants of James Davidson
................. +Mary Van Horn
*........ 3 Jane Davidson b: 15 November 1836 in , Rockland, New York d: 01 January 1914 Iowa
............ +Cornelius V. Anderson, Sr. b: 19 April 1835 in New York City, New York, New York d: 15 May 1895 Davenport,
Scott, Ia., US m: 28 December 1858 in New York, New York Co, New York
............. 4 Cornelius V. Anderson, Jr. b: Abt. October 1858 in Died 1 month after birth d: Abt. 25 November 1858
Greenwood Cemetery, Brooklyn, New York
............. 4 Jane Elizabeth "Jen" Anderson b: 09 June 1859 in Williams, Brooklyn, Kings, New York d: 19 July 1923
Possible Davenport, Scott, Iowa
................. +Fred Genslinger b: Abt. 1862 in Illinois d: 02 March 1928 Possible Davenport, Scott, Iowa m: Bef. 1894 in
Iowa
............. 4 Eleanor "Ella" Anderson b: 06 May 1860 in New York d: 04 July 1888 Chicago, Cook, Ill
............. 4 Emma Louise Anderson b: 1863 in New York d: 1874 Illinois
*............. 4 Elizabeth "Libby" Anderson b: 23 September 1865 in Brooklyn, New York, New York, US d: 03 January 1951
DeWitt, Clinton, Ia., US
................. +Charles Francis Kent b: 05 June 1863 in Davenport, Scott, Ia., US d: 21 June 1944 DeWitt, Clinton, Ia., US
m: 09 May 1893 in Davenport, Scott, Ia, U.S.
............. 4 Benjamin N. "Ben" Anderson, Sr. b: 25 September 1867 in New Jersey d: 02 October 1959 Ilinois/California
................. +Madge VanPelt b: Abt. 25 December 1874 in Louisiana d: Ilinois/California m: 16 March 1897 in Possible
Chicago, Cook, Illinois
............. 4 Cornelia V. "Nealie" Anderson b: 08 April 1871 in Chicago, Ill d: 05 November 1941 DeWitt, Clinton, Iowa
............. 4 Frederick Eugene Anderson b: 16 February 1873 in Chicago, Cook, Ill d: 17 December 1917 Iowa
................. +Arianna Lorton b: 14 July m: Aft. 1910
........ 3 Eleanor "Ella" Davidson b: 16 July 1838 in New York City, New York d: 25 January 1908 Flushing, New York City,
New York
............ +Joseph/James Knowles, Sr. b: 10 February 1839 in New York City, New York d: 23 December 1916 Flushing,
New York City, New York m: 22 April 1861 in Probably in New York
DAVIDSON ANCESTRY
4
Descendants of James Davidson
............. 4 James Knowles, Jr. d: Died 4 1/2 years old
............. 4 Andrew Anderson Knowles b: Abt. 1864
................. +Anna Coles
............. 4 Charles E. Knowles b: Abt. 1866
................. +Jean N. Nesmith/Nesenilth
............. 4 Jean Bertram Knowles b: 31 March 1867 in New York d: 12 January 1954 Dundas, Ontairo, Canada
................. +Thomas A. Bertram b: 16 January 1864 in Dundas, Ontario, Canada d: 07 June 1954 Dundas, Ontairo,
Canada m: 02 November 1888 in Dundas, Ontario, Canada
............. 4 Elizabeth G. "Lyde" Knowles b: Abt. 1870 in New York
............. 4 William W. Knowles b: Abt. 1872
................. +Suzanne Rockwell
............. 4 Eleanor D. Knowles b: Abt. 1871 in New York
................. +Charles J. Lainge b: in Canada m: Abt. 1902 in ?New York
............. 4 Mary S. Knowles b: Abt. 1877 in New York
................. +Edward Chester Beard b: Abt. 1875 in Connecticut m: Abt. 1916 in New York
........ 3 William Davidson b: Abt. 1841
........ 3 Delia/Adelia Davidson b: 26 February 1845 in New York d: 06 January 1925 Probably in New Jersey
............ +Eric Nicholas Erickson b: 1844 in Norway d: Bef. 1900 New York/New Jersey m: Abt. 1867 in Probably in New
York
............. 4 Jean Bertram Erickson b: Abt. 1868
................. +James Hallock
............. *2nd Husband of Jean Bertram Erickson:
................. +Henry Hall
DAVIDSON ANCESTRY
5
Descendants of James Davidson
............. 4 Julius E. Erickson b: May 1870 in New York
................. +Ida L. Haywood b: January 1872 in New Jersey m: Abt. 1896 in New Jersey
............. 4 Roger W. Erickson b: June 1872 in New York
............. 4 Eric N Erickson b: August 1879 in New Jersey
... 2 James Davidson b: 15 October 1808 in Berwick-upon-Tweed, Northumberland, England
... 2 Mary Davidson b: 11 March 1811 in Berwick-upon-Tweed, Northumberland, England
....... +Thomas Marshall b: in Of or near London
... 2 Margaret D. Davidson b: 1814 in Berwick-upon-Tweed, Northumberland, England d: 1850 England
....... +Leonord Hazelden b: Abt. 05 July 1807 in Framfield, England d: England m: Bef. 1833 in England
........ 3 Leonard Hazelden b: Abt. 30 June 1833
........ 3 Mary Hazelden b: Abt. 01 May 1836
........ 3 Maria Hazelden b: 21 February 1838
........ 3 Bridget Davidson Hazelden b: Abt. 19 August 1842
........ 3 William Hazelden b: Abt. 1845
........ 3 James Davidson Hazelden b: Abt. 1847
6Index of Individuals
Amelia -Unnamed: 2
Anderson -Benjamin N. , Sr. (aka: Ben): 3
Cornelia V. (aka: Nealie): 3
Cornelius V. , Jr.: 3
Cornelius V. , Sr.: 3
Eleanor (aka: Ella): 3
Elizabeth (aka: Libby): 3
Emma Louise: 3
Frederick Eugene: 3
Jane Elizabeth (aka: Jen): 3
Baverstock/Bavistock -
Elsie: 1
Beard -
Edward Chester: 4
Ben -(name: Benjamin N. Anderson, Sr.): 3
Bertram -
Jean: 1
Thomas A.: 4
Coles -Anna: 4
Davidson -Bridget: 1
Delia/Adelia: 4
Eleanor: 1
Eleanor (aka: Ella): 3
Elizabeth: 1
George: 1
James: 1
James: 5
James: 1
Jane: 3
Margaret D.: 5
Mary: 5
Mary Struthers: 2
Roger: 1
Roger: 1
William: 1
William: 4
Ella -(name: Eleanor Davidson): 3
(name: Eleanor Anderson): 3
Erickson -Eric N: 5
Eric Nicholas: 4
Jean Bertram: 4
Julius E.: 5
Roger W.: 5
Filley -Unnamed: 1
Genslinger -Fred: 3
Hall -Henry: 4
Hallock -James: 4
Haywood -Ida L.: 5
Hazelden -Bridget Davidson: 5
James Davidson: 5
Leonard: 5
Leonord: 5
Maria: 5
Mary: 5
William: 5
Hetfield -
Nettie M.: 2
Jen -(name: Jane Elizabeth Anderson): 3
Kent -Charles Francis: 3
Kirby -Frederick E.: 1
Jean Bertram: 1
John: 2
Mary S.: 2
Stephen Eugene: 1
Knowles -Andrew Anderson: 4
Charles E.: 4
Eleanor D.: 4
Elizabeth G. (aka: Lyde): 4
James , Jr.: 4
Jean Bertram: 4
Joseph/James , Sr.: 3
Mary S.: 4
Thomas J.: 2
William W.: 4
Lainge -
Charles J.: 4
Libby -(name: Elizabeth Anderson): 3
Lorton -Arianna: 3
Lyde -(name: Elizabeth G. Knowles): 4
Marshall -Alice: 2
Thomas: 5
Mary -Unnamed: 2
Murray -Augusta R: 2
James E.: 2
Jean Bertram: 2
John W. , Jr.: 2
John W. , Sr.: 2
Mary Stephens: 2
Roger F.: 2
Walter L.: 2
William D.: 2
Nealie -(name: Cornelia V. Anderson): 3
Nesbit -Cornelius S.: 1
Eleanor: 1
Nesmith/Nesenilth -Jean N.: 4
Rockwell -Suzanne: 4
Rushmore -7
Townshed: 2
Sandford -Joseph W.: 2
Struther -Mary: 1
Struthers -Ann: 1
Tilney -A. A.: 2
Van Horn -Mary: 3
Van Pelt -Madge: 3

Hazel Lockwood

May 4, 2014

Thanks to PGC Archivists and Historians Jeanne Turner and Patti Dunstan, we now are able to enjoy a few of the films found in Barbara Tracy Sandford's basement last year.

This color home movie is of Barbara Tracy Sandford's trip to Japan in the Spring of 1961. Barbara was the PGC President and the Garden Club of America's annual meeting was held in Hawaii that year. Barbara, along with her good friend and PGC Delegate, traveled to Hawaii and then joined the GCA on the side trip to Japan. Barbara often remarked how this trip was one of the greatest experiences of her life.

1961 Japan by Barbara Tracy Sandford Part I

1961 Japan by Barbara Tracy Sandford Part II

Apologies for the silence – I did not have time to lay down a music track to further your enjoyment! The best bits are the scenes of the GCA ladies in their Mad Men suits, hats and gloves. Barbara was clearly missing her family as she captures many snippets of adorable Japanese children. Had to laugh out loud when Japanese billboards, taken from the bus, popped on the screen – Barbara probably considered starting "Scenic Japan" at that point!

The Other Face of Freedom This circa 1970's black-and-white film was discovered in Barbara Tracy Sandford's memorabilia. It was produced by the Road Information Program in Washington, DC. It begins with perhaps a more conservation-themed dialogue about how over-building and lack of planning hurts our nation's resources. However, it seems like the auto industry swooped in from Detroit and the film ends with this message: Highways are a tool for becoming a better America.

Enjoy a look back at some iconic images of our Nation and glimpse a little Mad Men-themed advertising. It will remind you of your grade school film strips ('memba those?). Even though this was made about 40 years ago, a lot is still the same. (Shout out to Diana – check out the image of the Admiral on the Mississippi under the Gateway to the West!)

2014 GCA Page

December 7, 2014 Mabel Hunter by Dan Damon

Remembering Mabel Hunter: Women to watch out for: Mabel Hunter, Ruth Dobson and Barbara Sandford. Memorial Day, 2000.

December 28, 2014

Local blogger Dan Damon wrote this article, Suspicious fire at historic Plainfield building, regarding a fire at the Samuel W. Rushmore building on South Avenue. Many Rushmore relatives have been members of the PGC including current Affiliate Member Ginny Rushmore.

To learn more about this prominent family, click on these member albums:

Rushmore, Mrs. Murray (Helen Joy)
Rushmore, Mrs. Townsend (Jean Betram Murray) '20
Joy, Mrs. James R. (Emma Prentice McGee) '33
Mooney, Mrs. Wandell McMaster (Alice Joy McGee) '47
Joost, Mrs. Sherman Brownell (Marie Murray) '19
Murray, Mrs. James Everett (Alice Marshall) '20
Roome, Mrs. John Stanton (Dolores or "Dody" Murray) '57
Tilney, Mrs. Albert Arthur (Augusta R. Murray) '20
McGee, Mrs. Harry Livingston (Susan M. Howell) '18
McGee, Mrs. Walter Miller (Mary Alice Yerkes) '22
Lockwood, Mrs. Frederick M. (Hazel Marshall) '52
Lockwood, Mrs. William L. (Amy M.) '25
Marshall, Mrs. Henry P. (Dorothy Burke) '30
Howell, Mrs. Josephus Halsey (Romaine Ray) '22
Chambliss, Mrs. Leopold A. (Anna Scott Yerkes) '50
Eddy, Mrs. Charles Brown (Ellen Coolidge Burke) '15

And through marriage on her husband's side, the late Mrs. Webster (Barbara Tracy) Sandford '50.

Plainfield firefighters responded early Saturday evening to a suspicious fire in a historic factory structure at South Avenue and Berckman Street.

The complex of three buildings, parts of which are over a hundred years old, most recently housed the Royal Apex Company, a manufacturer of gutters and other metal and plastic extruded products. The buildings have been vacant since 2007, when Royal Apex was bought out by Berger Building Products, Inc., and operations were moved to Pennsylvania.

Originally, the buildings housed the Rushmore Dynamo Works, owned by Plainfield entrepreneur and inventor Samuel W. Rushmore. Rushmore made his fortune in patents and manufacturing several key improvements in automobile technology.

Among his notable inventions – or improvements on those of others – are the automatic starter, cooling systems for internal combustion engines, the flared automobile headlamp, a searchlight, and locomotive headlights. At one time, half of all the automatic starters used in American automobiles were manufactured in the Plainfield location.

Rushmore sold the business in 1914 to the Bosch Magneto Company, with the proviso that the Rushmore name be used on its products for a number of years. When Bosch violated the terms of the agreement, Rushmore successfully sued (see here) for $100,000 (which would be over $2 million today).

Bosch, a German company with a U.S. branch, established a separate U.S. corporation, headquartered in New York City. Because of suspicions of its owners' loyalty, Bosch was nationalized in both the First and Second World Wars – with control returning to private hands in 1948.

Though several area fire companies responded to the blaze, it was quickly brought under control. A source told me the fire is suspected to be arson, a determination that will be made officially by arson investigators.

January 30, 2015

Just found this photo of Barbara, Jeanne, and "Mrs Drake." In costume.
Please send on to your sisters.

Dr Turner

February 27, 2015 GCA Fights Billboards

UNPRECEDENTED COURT FILING:

The NAL and Conservation Committees recently voted to recommend that GCA file an amicus brief in Scenic America v.the Federal Highway Administration, a federal court case concerning digital billboards. The recommendation was based on GCA's role in the 1965 Highway Beautification Act, its longstanding opposition to unsightly billboards, and its ongoing interest in preserving natural landscapes on our nation's highways. Executive unanimously approved the filing. The brief, filed December 29, 2014, was joined by the Sierra Club, the American Planning Association, and the Dark Sky Association.

The late PGC Mrs. Barbara Tracy Sandford '50, co-founder of Scenic America, would be thrilled!

Detwiller blueprints 1275 Denmark

August 8, 2015

Library offers trove of vintage Plainfield home blueprints for sale

Plainfield homeowners and history buffs are getting a one-of-a-kind opportunity as the Plainfield Public Library prepares to offer upwards of 3,000 blueprint originals from its Detwiller Collection for sale to the public.

The blueprints offered for sale are part of a trove of many thousands recovered from a dumpster at City Hall by the late Plainfield architect and artist Charles Detwiller.

While many of Plainfield's grand homes and mansion are among the blueprints (though fewer than originally, owing to some 'fingering' before strict controls were put in place), the appeal of the collection will be stronger for those who live in or admire the more modest vintage homes from the turn of the 20th century to the World War II era.

These homes include many classic Tudors and other 'cottage' and 'revival' styles, as well as 'foursquares', ranches and Cape Cods and more contemporary stules.

These represent the bulk of Plainfield's building stock from its most expansive period and they were often enough improved or expanded – giving rise to the need for plans showing the original building and the proposed alterations to be filed with the City's inspections department.

It is those blueprints, which have now been cataloged and digitized, that are being offered for sale. In library parlance, they have been de-accessioned, meaning that they no longer need be kept permanently by the Library and are available for dispostion to private parties.

The Library has a portal to the Charles Detwiller Blueprint Collection on its website (see here) and has made a complete list of the blueprints for sale also available online (see here).

The list is alphabetized by street name, and then number. However, I would advise reading the Library's instructions closely so you make the proper notations for your request (see here) – easing the staff's task in finding the item(s) in which you are interested. Paying attention to the suggested time frames needed and numbers of items per request will help you avoid headaches. So, please read and follow the instructions carefully – as carpenters like to say, 'measure twice, cut once'.

The sale will run from September 1 to November 13, 2015 in a two-step process –

You check the offerings to find items that interest you, making careful notations; and

You and the Library work out a pick-up appointment, at which you will be able to view the actual items and make a final decision on your purchase.

Single-page blueprints are priced at $50 each and multiple-page sets at $100. Cash or credit cards are fine, but the Library will not accept personal checks.

Proceeds of the sale will be used to finance the further digitization of the blueprint collection – meaning that we can look forward to another offering of materials at some future point.

The Detwiller Collection is absolutely unique in its size and scope, covering decades of Plainfield history and thousands of buildings throughout the city. Plainfield residents owe Charlie Detwiller a debt of gratitude for his perspicacity that cannot be repaid.

And we owe a debt of gratitude to Library Director Joe Da Rold for the vision that saw in these rescued documents an invaluable resource for the community, and devised means and methods of ensuring these fragile records would be available to Plainfield residents permanently through having them digitized.

EDITOR'S NOTE:
Mr. Detwiller is the late husband of PGC Honorary member Cath Detwiller. Mr. Detwiller's Aunt Laura was a long-time member of the PGC and a very talented botanical artist. Read about the Detwiller family here:

Detwiller, Mrs. Charles H. (Catherine or "Cath" Campbell), Jr. '57

Detwiller, Miss Laura Cecelia '29

And Mr. Detwiller's in-laws:

Campbell, Mrs. William Hall (Mabel C. Raper) '28

Davis, Mrs. F. Edgar (Dorothy or "Dottie" Campbell) '60

December 18, 2015

The Climes, They Are A-Changin'

Local writer Bernice Paglia mentions two members of the PGC in today's post:

Barbara Sandford
Mary Vic Griswold

March 23, 2016

Local blogger Dan Damon "borrowed" an image that we had posted from the late Barbara Sandford's memorabilia. Just another way we help preserve and give back to the Plainfield community. SEE HERE

November 21, 2018 Plainfield Holiday House Tour

It pays to have friends in high places! Brenda has once again used her might to secure for us advanced notice of the list of homes on the Saturday, December 1st Plainfield Holiday House tour:

* 1030 Central, Georgian Revival (1896), currently the Ducret School, former home of Mrs. Howard (Agnes Fales Strong) Huntington '19. The house is also affiliated with Mrs. Walter Miller (Mary Alice Yerkes) McGree '22 and Miss Bertha Virginia Zerega '23.
* 1023 Central Avenue, Georgian Revival Colonial (1926)
* 308 W. 8th Street, Queen Anne Victorian (1893)
* 1341 Prospect, French Normandy Tudor (1916), First the home of Mrs. Homer P. (Elisabeth Nash) Cochran '52 (who's descendant is the husband of Somerset Hills GC Tabby Cochran); and then the home of Mrs. William R. (Peggy) Barrett '67, daughter of beloved member Nancy Dwinnell Kroll (later Gordon) '60 and sister-in-law to Sally Kroll '80 and sister to Priscilla Kroll Farnum '80.
* 1420 Evergreen, Tudor (1926)
* 1112 Watchung Avenue, Georgian Revival (1921), Founding PGC Member Mrs. Frederick Washburn (Bertha Kedzie Cornwell) Yates '15 home with her sunken garden in the side yard!
* 750 Belvedere, Tudor Revival (1904)
* 1275 Denmark Road, Dutch Colonial (1935), the former home of our much beloved Mrs. Webster (Barbara Tracy) Sandford '50

Brenda adds, "If anyone wants to be a docent, the tour committee discount docents so we pay $15 instead of $35. Shifts are 10:00 to 12:30 and from 12:30 to 3:00, followed by a party at the historic art school DuCret. It's also where the boutique is held."

CLICK HERE TO SEE THE TOUR MAP


We have a long list of all the Plainfield homes & Gardens (in street alphabetical order) here. If you are going on the tour, be sure to check out the neighboring houses – they may have once hosted at PGC meeting!

September 17, 2019

Barbara would be so happy!

We are very pleased to pass along the news that the Reviving America's Scenic Byways Act of 2019 passed the Senate yesterday. It passed the House earlier this year and now heads to the President's desk for a signature. Many, who have preceded us, have worked hard on this important legislation. In fact, very insightful GCA members helped to found Scenic America and have continued the fight to keep America's scenic vistas protected. This is a perfect example of where our advocacy efforts have made a difference. – GCA

scenic.org
Mrs. Webster (Barbara Tracy) Sandford '50

September 23, 2019

2019 GCA NAL Attendee Christine Kamil shares this good news:

Last night the White House announced that President Trump signed into law the "Reviving America's Scenic Byways Act of 2019."

"A nice bit of news to share with the club. We worked on this during NAL this year." – Christine

As we reported on September 17th, GCA was optimistic this would happen and as PGC members, we should be especially excited as one of our own, Barbara Sandford, was a founding member. Lets collectively (and figuratively) raise a glass to "Auntie Litter" and her Very Strong opposition to billboards. She "got it" all those years ago and now our nation gets it now. Brava!

Previous post: Barbara would be so happy!

We are very pleased to pass along the news that the Reviving America's Scenic Byways Act of 2019 passed the Senate yesterday. It passed the House earlier this year and now heads to the President's desk for a signature. Many, who have preceded us, have worked hard on this important legislation. In fact, very insightful GCA members helped to found Scenic America and have continued the fight to keep America's scenic vistas protected. This is a perfect example of where our advocacy efforts have made a difference. – GCA

scenic.org
Mrs. Webster (Barbara Tracy) Sandford '50
"[Barbara] was a founder and served as President of the Roadside Council of NJ. She was a founding director of Scenic America in 1982 and received the Stafford Award in 1999, their highest honor."


Christine was joined in Washington by Peter Simone. CLICK HERE to read their report on the February 2019 Garden Club of America's National Affairs & Legislation conference.