Plainfield Garden Club








1946 Archives

This was obtained from the publication The History of the Plainfield Garden Club 1915 - 1965 by Victoria Furman

This was obtained from the publication The History of the Plainfield Garden Club 1915 - 1965 by Victoria Furman

This was obtained from the publication The History of the Plainfield Garden Club 1915 - 1965 by Victoria Furman

This was obtained from the publication The History of the Plainfield Garden Club 1915 - 1965 by Victoria Furman

This was obtained from the publication The History of the Plainfield Garden Club 1915 - 1965 by Victoria Furman

Miss Harriette R. Halloway

http://andyswebtools.com/cgi-bin/p/awtp-pa.cgi?d=plainfield-garden-club&type=3680

1941 - 1947 Club History by Etheldreda Anderegg

1941 - 1947 Club History by Etheldreda Anderegg

1941 - 1947 Club History by Etheldreda Anderegg version 2

[Editor's note: The original document was too faded to scan. This is a different version of a history written by Mrs. Etheldreda Anderegg from 1941 1947]

Plainfield Garden Club History
Continued to 1947

On May 14th, 1941 six years ago to-day in Cedarbrook Park the Anniversary Dogwood Trees were formally presented to the Park Commission. In making the presentation, Mrs. Arthur Nelson, president, said the garden club wished to make a gift of lasting beauty to mark its anniversary. Mr. Tracey responding for the Park Commissioners commended the club for its civic interest and declared the trees would bring a touch of beauty to thousands of lives. The gift was identified by a large boulder bearing a bronze marker. Mrs. Holliday as chairman of the Dogwood Tree Committee and of the Boulder Committee arranged the anniversary celebration.

That year, 1941, an article appeared in Horticulture in praise of our Shakespeare Garden.

A teacher of the Jefferson School staff was sent to the Audubon Nature Camp in Maine.

Handsome new yearbooks containing a revised constitution, membership lists and permanent covers with loose leaves were issued. About this time some of our members looking back upon some of our achievements of the past, and forward for new horizons to explore, agreed that once more we should storm the ramparts of the Garden Club of America. No organization in garden club circles offers to its members such a wide field of opportunities and assured prestige. This reporter has sat in many important national and state conferences were the effect of this prestige could be observed. When important decisions were due there was an intangible inference in the atmosphere which stemmed to imply "All those not members of the Garden State of America may now retire to the Jim Crow car."

Better to have failed in the high aim than to succeed vulgarly in the low one" said Browning.

So a committee to explore the possibilities of our being accepted for membership was named by Mrs. Nelson. With Mrs. Corriel as chairman, the committee consisted of Miss Elsie Harmon, Mrs. C. Boardman Tyler, Miss Elizabeth Browne, Miss William Tyler, Mrs. William A. Holliday, Mrs. James Devlin and your historian. Our search for new worlds to conquer began with a meeting at the home of Mrs. William Tyler, on February 21, 1941, when your historian read a letter she had been asked to write to Mrs. Frederic Kellogg, of Morristown Garden Club, prominent garden club personality. The letter would be interesting at this point, but unfortunately it has been lost. Suffice to say, our prise of ourselves was so completely uninhibited that the committee itself was profoundly impressed by the record of performance of the Plainfield Garden Club set forth therein. Shakespeare said "Virtue is bold, and goodness never fearful." After all they could not know our worth unless we told them. This time we forestalled a verdict that we had "accomplished nothing."

It might be interjected here that during Mrs. Goddard's regime an effort was made to join the Garden Club of America. Mrs. Kellogg, approached on that occasion, graciously entertained Mrs. Goddard and Mrs. Holliday at luncheon, and they left with the impression that Plainfield, having rejected an invitation to become a charter member of that organization during Mrs. Herring's tenure, it would be futile ever to hope for membership.

An active campaign was launched by all who had relatives or friends in member clubs. This was accelerated when it was learned that a neighboring club had an identical ambition, and had found a sponsor. Because of geographical allocation, we realized that only one of us would be admitted. When it became apparent that we had aroused interest, and had a semblance of chance for acceptance, a special meeting was called at the home of Mrs. Corriel, and the advantages of membership in the Garden Club of America, as well as the financial obligations thoroughly explored. The club was asked to decide whether they wished the committee to proceed with the negotiations. The vote was unanimously affirmative.

Subsequently Mrs. Kellogg requested that the Morristown Club have the pleasure of proposing us, and Mrs. Lauderdale of Short Hills offered to have that club second us. While we waited for the verdict, our campaign never waned.

On May 11th, 1941, tenth anniversary of Iris Garden, the executive board gave a tea to honor Miss Halloway. Mrs. Holliday arranged a delightful affair in the field house. Members of the garden club and thirty guests were invited. Miss Halloway's friends came from far and near while the Iris Garden glowed in a rainbow of colors for the occasion.

The war which was sweeping over France while Mrs. VanBoskerck's history concluded had now reached our shores. "Come to open purple testament of bleeding war." (King Richard) Our members were working for the U.S.O., the Red Cross and Camp Kilmer, apart and in conjunction with the garden club. Plans were sent to the camp to enhance its barren scenes, and seeds to Brittain. Victory gardens were planted, two new chairmanships were added to the executive board War Activities and Victory Gardens.

In May 1943, we provided vases and began to send flowers regularly to the chapels at Camp Kilmer. This is still being done. Garden books from the Garden Center were placed in the Public Library. Because of gasoline and food rationing it was becoming difficult to hold meetings. Speakers were reluctant to use scarce gasoline and tires for small groups. The war organizations were asking for more things, more effort and more money. The garden club was striving to provide all three.

In June 1943 a delegation from the Garden Club of America came to inspect our members' gardens. Those gardens chosen to head the list were duly explored and approved, but unfortunately the sand of time ran out before they could see them all, and they will never realize all they missed. However, they did see the dogwood planting, the Shakespeare and Iris gardens.

At the annual meeting Mrs. Samuel Carter gave a particularly interesting history of the Shakespeare garden, which was later read by request at the Shakespeare Club. Mrs. Carter said in part: "It has been said that we of the Western World love flowers for what they are, and that the peoples in the East love them for what they suggest. A Shakespeare Garden is full of suggestions, a speaking garden revealing the tradition, folklore and romance of the ancient and timeless plants." Mr. Tracey quoted an authority on the subject as saying that Mrs. Carter's was the finest Shakespeare Garden in the country and that over 15,000 people visited it last year.

Mrs. Coriell announced at the executive board meeting February 2nd, 1944, that Plainfield Garden Club had been elected to membership in the Garden Club of America, and letters of welcome received from sponsoring clubs. It had required three years to reach the new horizons, but a poet once said, "A horizon is nothing but the limit of our sight" so each one attained shows another beckoning in the distance.

Because of rationing, meetings were held in semi-public places of central location. Speakers stressed every phase of conservation. Garden club members were working hard at Camp Kilmer, for the Red Cross and the U.S.O.

In 1945 we became a Founder of the Blue Star Drive, our members contributing generously to this beautiful tribute to the men who served in the armed forces. It is hoped, and the hope is rapidly being fulfilled, that ultimately it will stretch from New Jersey to California.

A new custom was instituted, that of sending a sum of money to the Red Wood Tribute Grove in memory of deceased members. This year, 1945, a dance recital was given to help defray expenses of war activities. Naturally it was under the chairmanship of Miss Maud vonBoskerck, whose motto might well be "Music is my talent my dearest one." It was very successful artistically and financially.

We helped the New York Botanical Garden celebrate its Fiftieth Anniversary by sending hostesses every day for a week, and by a substantial sum of money for plant research.

In 1945 Lyons Hospital was included on our flower and plant list, and we have continued to supply it weekly for two months of each year. Flowering trees were planted along Blue Star Drive in memory of members' sons lost in the war.

Mrs. Samuel Carter and Miss Harriette Halloway received awards from the Garden Club of New Jersey for their work in Shakespeare and Iris gardens respectively.

Besides bouquets were made twice a week for the wards at Camp Kilmer, beginning in May. Our members volunteered to arrange them.

By this time we were discovering that those "new worlds to conquer" for which we had longed, were providing more opportunities than we could well cope with, and so a junior membership was formed, now numbering six.

The associate membership was enlarged to thirty-five so that active members might be enabled to transfer to it. A questionnaire was sent of work they wished to do. In a Garden Club of America contest for a year's program, Miss Halloway's won honorable mention.

Beginning early in December members of the club met every day in Mrs. Boardman Tyler's studio to make Christmas decorations for the hospital at Camp Kilmer. A big fire blazed in the stove, tons of varied evergreens were provided as well as all other necessary equipment. The studio hummed like Santa Claus' workshop, and great quantities of wreaths with large red bows, small bouquets and other favors emerged to cheer the soldiers at Camp Kilmer and Lyons Hospitals. Joyce Kilmer, for whom the camp was named, wrote of his experience in the other World War: "My shoulders ache beneath my pack, Lie easier cross upon his back" We hoped we eased their burden just a little.

The opportunities offered by the Garden Club of America in the field of conservation are so many and so varied, it was necessary to choose which tangent to pursue. In view of the community and national problems of vandalism and child delinquency, it was thought wise to concentrate the major effort in combating these evils. Working through the public schools seemed the most logical procedure. Mr. Wimer of Jefferson School and Mrs. Rulison of the Park Commission have offered sympathetic cooperation. The first step in the program is the establishment of school gardens, now in process of being planted. The garden club provided the funds. A trial garden, or proving bed was started in Cedarbrook Park in 1946. This year many new perennials were added.

Mrs. Hubble's artistic ability was employed so successfully in redecorating the Garden Center, this observer could scarcely recognize it.

The Garden Club of New Jersey bestowed an award upon us for meritorious work at Camp Kilmer. Miss Halloway has made additions to the peony, Iris and Narcissus gardens. It again became necessary to raise money, and a repeat performance by request, of the dance recital was staged by Miss Van Boskerck.

A suggestion from the Garden Club of New Jersey that we plant a tree to honor garden weekled, after consultation with Mr. Tracey, to the beginning of a dogwood arboretum comprising all the varieties that will grow in this vicinity. Twenty-five varieties have already been planted.

Santa Claus helpers gathered again in Mrs. Tyler's studio to make decorations for Camp Kilmer, and surpassed their effort of the previous year. Our work in this Project was not equaled by that of any club either year.

A thrill of pride must have quivered through our membership from founders to newest recruits, triumphs of our members who exhibited in the New York Flower Show. In the realm of flower arrangement there is no more coveted award than the Fenwick Medal. Our Mrs. deHart was runner up fro that prize last year. This year four exhibits won three blue ribbons and two special awards. It was a magnificent performance which won for us third place in the sweepstakes.

Chapel flowers still are sent to Camp Kilmer. Our members arrange them. We take our turn with the other clubs supplying flowers for the entire hospital regularly from gardens when possible, from florists in cold weather. Two gray Ladies representing Plainfield Garden Club, arrange and distribute the flowers through the wards. The by-laws were again revised and new books issued for the permanent covers.

The executive committee has not overlooked the fact that a War Memorial is of paramount interest to the garden club. Much time as been spent in discussion and deep thought given the matter. Mrs. Boardman Tyler has been named a member of the committee. This year we are sending a teacher to the Audubon Nature Camp in Maine, and another to the Conservation Workshop in Trenton.

Several members have been invited to speak on varied subjects, notably Mrs. Garret Smith on Church Gardens, and Miss Halloway on horticultural subjects. Mrs. Garret has been honored as founder of the Little Garden Club of New York City, of which she is honorary president.

A big of biographical information picked up while perusing the minutes is that our new president, Mrs. Loziuex, became a member of the club in 1940, second vice president in 1942, again in 1945, first vice president in 1946 and president in 1947.

Having been a member of the club only ten years, your historian cannot speak with absolute authority, but thinks it probably that the club reached greater heights of achievement under this administration of Mrs. Tyler than during any comparable period of time. This is partly true because of the new opportunities offered by affiliation with the Garden Club of America, and partly due to Mrs. Tyler's dynamic energy and her determination that the Plainfield Garden Club take advantage of these opportunities and assume its rightful position in the vanguard of progressive garden clubs.

Junius described Mrs. Tyler perfectly when he wrote: "the heart to conceive, the understanding to direct and the hand to execute."

We notice as we go over the chronicles of the garden club, the absence of names once listed so frequently:

Those whom we loved so long, and see no more
Loved and still love,
Not dead, but gone before.

If we ever adopt a coat of arms, it might well show crossed trowels over a field of flower arrangements, the other expounding the futility of vandalism to a young cub. And the motto? It must be from Shakespeare, and it is from The Tempest: Now would I give a thousand furlongs of sea for an acre of barren ground.

Or if we choose to abandon the classics: Never a dull moment!

Etheldreda Anderegg
Historian, 1947

The American Red Cross May 29, 1946

Honorable Mention New York Flower Show Mrs. J. Harold Loizeaux, Plainfield Garden Club, 1946

Smithsonian Archives
http://collections.si.edu/search/results.jsp?view=&date.slider=&q=plainfield+&dsort=&start=60


Catalogued Data:
Title:New York Flower Show [slide]
Creator: Cassebeer, F. W
Physical description: 1 slide: glass lantern, col.; 3 x 5 in
Type: Projected media
Place: United States of America, New York, New York
New York (State)
New York City
Date: 1946
03/18/1946
Topic: Spring
Flower shows
Flower arrangement
Interior views
Tables
Tulips
Sculpture
Painting
Local number: NY208296
Restrictions: Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu
Notes: No Names for Picture. "Arrangement against wall, green colors predominating." New Hampshire, 18th c. Colonial, Honorable Mention Mrs. J. Harold Loizeaus, Plainfield, N. J
Data Source: Archives of American Gardens
Record Identifier:siris_arc_193488

1945 - 1946 Treasurer Book

1946 - 1947 Treasurer Book

Plainfield Public Library Archive

New York Times, Saturday, October 15, 1966

Harriette Rice Halloway: Jersey Horticulturalist, 91

PLAINFIELD, N. J., Oct. 14 – Harriette Rice Halloway a nationally known horticulturalist died today in Muhlenberg Hospital. Her age was 91 and her home was at 112 Linden Avenue, North Plainfield.

Miss Halloway designed the iris garden in Cedarbrook Park in 1932, was consultant to the Union County Park Commission and helped to set up the cornus (dogwood) collection in Cedarbrook Park in 1946.

She received many honors for her work, among them a distinguished service medal from the Garden Club of America in 1958, and had been active as a horticultural judge. She was a member of the Royal Horticultural Society. In 1957 a iris was named for her.

Miss Halloway was born in Newark and attended Columbia University. She taught geography at the Wardlaw School, a country day school for boys, from 1916 to 1949.

1946 Check Book

No. 601
May 15, 1946
Collection of Internal Revenue
for sale of 296 tickets
for Recital @ .33 each
$97.68

No. 602
May 15, 1946
New York Botanical Garden
Sustaining dues 1946-47
Budget
$25.00

No. 603
May 17, 1946
Interstate Printing Corp.
455 Programs for Recital May 10
$14.00

1946 Check Book

No. 604
May 17, 1946
Interstate Printing Corp.
500 for dore?? the Post Cards
Corres. Sec
$17.00

No. 605
May 17, 1946
Robert E. Vokes
Tuning Piano for recital May 10
$10.00

No. 606
June 5, 1946
Harriet Hubbell
Garden center
Budget
$25.00

1946 Check Book

No. 607
June 5, 1946
Herbert C. Brownwell
Lecture
Budget - Programs
$30.00

No. 608
June 10, 1946
Elsie Harman
For Shakespeare Garden
(sale of plants)
$10.00
Budget

No. 609
June 12, 1946
Harriette R. Halloway
Iris Budget
$25.00

1946 Check Book

No. 610
Aug. 12, 1946
The Garden Club of America
Annuel Dues for 71 Members
Budget
$284.00

No. 611
Sept. 18, 1946
Mr. John Jennings
Lecture
Budget
$20.00

No. 612
Oct. 7, 1946
The Garden Club of America
Contributors Fund
$25.00

1946 Check Book

No. 613
Oct. 14, 1946
Harriette R. Halloway
Horticulture Comm.
Iris - Budget
$10.00

No. 614
Nov. 13, 1946
Harriette R. Halloway
Iris Budget
$15.00

No. 615
Nov. 13, 1946
American Red Cross
flowers for Kilmer
through April 1st 7.00
Bedside flowers for November 10.00

In margin:

Gift (Mrs. McLellan 5.00)
Mrs. Anderegg
for war services
$15.00

1946 Check Book

No. 616
Nov. 19, 1946
Union County Parks Commission
for dogwood
Budget
$8.79

No. 617
Nov. 21, 1946
Garden Club of N. J.
Dues 1947
$10.00

No. 618
Dec. 2, 1946
Interstate Printing
postcards Recording
Secretary
$17.00

In left margin:

from Mrs. Anderegg $15.00

1946 Check Book

No. 619
Dec. 9, 1946
Florence M. Scott
5 copies "Shakespeare Garden in Cedarbrook Park" and "How to start a Shakespeare Garden"
Shakespeare
$3.00

No. 620
Dec. 9, 1946
Star Letter Shop
Mimeographing 79 post
cards for Oct. 9. meeting
Cor. Sec.
$3.00

No. 621
Dec. 14, 1946
Walter M. Ritchie
for Xmas tress
War Services
$20.00

March 18, 1946 Mrs. Loizeaux's entry

Title:
New York Flower Show [slide]
Forms part of:
Garden Club of America Collection,
Phy. Description:
1 slide: glass lantern, col.; 3 x 5 in.
Digital Reference:

Produced:
03/18/1946
General Note:
No Names for Picture. "Arrangement against wall, green colors predominating." New Hampshire, 18th c. Colonial, Honorable Mention Mrs. J. Harold Loizeaus, Plainfield, N. J.
Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Subject-Topical:
Spring
Flower shows
Flower arrangement
Interior views
Tables
Tulips
Sculpture
Painting
Subject - Geographical:
New York (State) – New York City
United States of America New York New York
Repository Loc:
Smithsonian Gardens, PO Box 37012, Capital Gallery, Suite 3300, MRC 506, Washington, DC 20013-7012
Local Number:
NY208296
Co-Creator:
Cassebeer, F. W.

1945 - 1950 Scrapbook

April 23, 1965 Garden Club History Reviews Past 50 Years

A history of the Plainfield Garden Club was presented to members Wednesday by Mrs. Edward H. Ladd 3rd at the club's annual meeting in the home of Mrs. Edgar F. Davis, 1080 Rahway Rd. Mrs. Alexander Kroll was co-hostess.

The history has been published to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Garden Club, which was formed in 1915.

The first part of the history was written by a charter member, now deceased, Mrs. Thomas Van Boskerck. The second part, covering the years from 1940-1965, was written by Mrs. Gerald Furman, and highlights the accomplishment of all the departments of the club.

Special emphasis is given to the three continuing projects: the Shakespeare Garden started in 1927; the Dogwood Collection, sponsored since 1946; and the Iris Garden begun in 1932; all in Cedar Brook Park. These three gardens have received national recognition and many awards for excellence.

The Union County Park Commission has just named the dogwood planting, "The Harriette R. Halloway Cornus Collection," in appreciation of the club's many years of service to park activities. Miss Halloway, 90, is the Garden Club's oldest living member and an authority on cornus and iris.

Mrs. Edwin J. Fitzpatrick, nominating chairman, present the slate of officers which was elected as follows: President, Mrs. Wayne J. Holman Jr.; first vice president, Mrs. David Sanders; second vice president, Mrs. F. Gregg Burger; treasurer, Mrs. William K. Dunbar Jr.; recording secretary, Mrs. C. Northrup Pond; and corresponding secretary, Mrs. C. Benson Wigton Jr.

Mrs. Holman and Mrs. Sandford will attend the annual meeting of the Garden Club of America in Cleveland, Ohio from May 10-14. Mrs. Holman will present a resume of recent program given by members of the Plainfield Club on the botanical background of the mallow plant family.

Mrs. John Wells of Valley Road, Watchung, said the club will again give scholarships to the Audubon summer camps or the N. J. State School of Conservation at Stokes Forest, as has been done since 1941. School teachers and scout leaders are eligible to apply for the scholarships.

A colored movie, entitled "Wings Over Blitzen," was shown, picturing wildlife in its natural state in the Malheur Wildlife Refuge near Burns, Ore.

Tea followed the meeting. Mrs. C. Benson Wigton and Mrs. Blanche P. Nash presided at the tea table, which was decorated with an arrangement of white spring flowers.

Tuesday, May 8, 1956

Tea to Honor Pioneer in Planting of Dogwood

Almost as though it had the power of imagination, the dogwood in Cornus (Dogwood) Dr., Cedar Brook Park, is expected to reach its annual stage of flowering beauty this week.

For tomorrow, at 4 p.m., members of the Plainfield Garden Club and its Cornus Arboretum Committee will hold a tea and reception to honor two pioneers in the 25-year-ago development of what has become the most outstanding horticultural display in this section of the country.

They are Mrs. Thomas van Boskerck and Miss Harriette R. Halloway and the tribute will be paid to them in the Field House of Cedar Brook Park, with Mrs. Robert T. Stevens acting as chairman, assisted by Mrs. Georges J. His and Mrs. William K. Dunbar Jr.

Commission Cooperated

Mrs. Van Boskerck suggested the planting of a vacant space in Cedar Brook park – then under development – with dogwood, in 1931, a suggestion which aroused immediately the interest of the Garden Club members. Support came from Miss Halloway and the then club president, Mrs. Henry Wells. Cooperation of the Union County Park Commission was obtained.

In 1940, plans were made for an extended planting, with Mrs. William A. Holliday and Mrs. William Tyler as co-chairmen. They approached the Park Commission and that body furnished a large boulder and suitable tablet for the drive entrance.

The 1931 planting had included 78 white and 17 pink dogwoods. In 1940, another 110 were added, on both sides of the drive. The Park Commission added a background of evergreens to make the setting even more attractive.

Plantings Expanded

The suggestion of W. R. Tracey of the commission led, in 1946, to further expansion of the plantings into a full arboretum. In its development, the advice and cooperation of Ralph H. Carver of the commission, was an important factor.

There are now 45 varieties of dogwood in the Arboretum, and some young trees are grown to add to the arboretum in the commission's nurseries. So extensive was the local display grown that it now is necessary to exchange with other arboretums in the nations, since the average nursery no longer has the capacity to supply rare and beautiful varieties.

By request, articles on the Cedar Brook Arboretum have been written for the Bulletin of the Garden Club of America and the Bulletin of the Arboretum organization in Seattle, Wash.

Dr. Donald Wyman, head of the Arnold Arboretum, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass., has listed the Cedar Brook plantings in his authoritative "Arboretums and Botanical Gardens of America," a unique distinction.

One rare species is the "Cornus Nuttalli," native of the West Coast from British Columbia to Seattle, Wash. Told that it had once held a single bloom here, Dr. Wyman was astounded.

This year, the rare tree, planted by Miss Halloway, has nine buds.

Tuesday, May 8, 1956

1975-1976 The Junior League of Plainfield

1946

Cooperated in presenting "Know Your Neighbors" program and tea in the public library.
Helped Mellick Community House expand recreational program.
Joined with other N. J. Leagues to present "Books Bring Adventure" radio series on Newark station.
Audience-participation movie trouped to area schools.

October 31, 2013 More Archives Recovered From the Plainfield Library

Today Club Archivists Jeanne and Patti arranged to "open the vault" on our fascinating archives with Sarah Hull, our most favorite Plainfield Librarian. Nina and Susan F. joined and HUNDREDS of photos were taken of 5 of the scrapbooks so lovingly prepared by Club Members. (Check out the photos of the PGC Historians here.)

Here are the first results:

1945 - 1950 Scrapbook

1954 - 1970 296 Images from Plainfield Library Scrapbook

1970 Scrapbook – PGC Hosts the GCA Zone IV Meeting

These scrapbooks will be loaded into the online Archives by year and then by member that may be cited in the articles within the scrapbooks. Although extremely tedious, this filing system quickly compiles to form very interesting "snapshots" into the eras of the Club and the individual members.

One the of the most rewarding aspects of this work is finding photos of members we have never "seen" before. Members that were discovered today include Katrina Benton, Euphemia "Peggy" Burger, Helen Flanders, Elizabeth King, Fannie Leggett, Jean Miller and Jean Rogers.

Everyone is welcome to head to the the Plainfield Library Archival room and photograph our stuff! With these digital images we are creating a unique and valuable history of not only these members, but of all of Plainfield.

October 26, 2013

Jeanne & Patti, Club Historians & Archivists, have arranged a meeting at the Plainfield Library this coming Thursday, October 31st at 10 AM to continue photographing and documenting our Archives stored there. Nina and Susan F. will be joining them. If you would like to assist, please join the group in the lower level Archive Room. If you have a digital camera/iPhone, please bring it. (Laptops with WORD are also welcome to transcribe Meeting Minutes.)

We take photographs of the photos and documents and then tediously file them by member name and year to our website. All this meticulous work is worth it though as we have uncovered so much of not only the Club's past, but Plainfield's as well.

And what's her history?
Twelfth Night: II, iv

Cornus Arboretum

From the 1965 History of the Plainfield Garden Club

Our beautiful dogwood trees stand on what was once the city dump. The story of this evolution of beauty began in 1929 when Mrs. Charles Eaton presented 50 dogwood trees to Cedar Brook Park from her own woods. In 1931, with Mrs. Henry Wells as Chairman, 45 dogwood trees, white and pink, were donated by the Plainfield Garden Club and were planted on one side of the drive entering from Park Avenue. Nine years later, (1940), under the guidance of Mrs. Thomas R. Van Boskerck and Mrs. William Holliday, 110 trees were added to extend the first row and to form another on the opposite side of the road. Since this planting coincided with our own 25th anniversary, a large boulder bearing a bronze marker was placed near the entrance.

In 1946, the Park Commission, a group of progressive and dedicated gentlemen, asked our Club if we would sponsor a Cornus Arboretum, using the Dogwood Drive as a foundation. We accepted – indeed, yes! A committee was formed with Miss Harriette R. Halloway as Secretary and Advisor, whose goal it was to include every Cornus, Specie and Cultivar, which was obtainable and which would thrive in this climate. Through the years, chairmen have included Mrs. R. T. Stevens, Mrs. George His, and Mrs. C. Boardman Tyler. As in our other gardens, the Park Commission has planted, raised seedlings in their nursery and provided maintenance.

Through purchases, gifts and exchanges with other Arboretums, 26 varieties were planted in the next five years. By 1948, there were 219 trees, giving masses of beautiful spring bloom as well as fall display of foliage and berries. Thousands of visitors walked or drove through this fairyland of beauty, surely the better for having seen it.

Today, through the inspired leadership of Miss Halloway, the Cornus Collection contains more than sixty varieties, some quite rare. All the others being horticultural selections of "clones" (cultivars). Experts consider the Cornus Collection to be the outstanding horticultural and civic achievement of our Club. It was highly gratifying in 1957, when officials from the New York Botanical Garden came out to see it.

Prof. Benjamin Blackburn, in a recent article in the American Horticulture Magazine says, 'It does not appear that a comparable collection exists. The Cornus Collection offers an admirable example of cooperation between groups interested in the cultural and horticultural riches of a municipality . . . none other is known to the writer to be existing elsewhere in the country."

To quote Miss Halloway, "each year the trees continue to be beautiful and a joy, if not forever, at least for many years."

Written by Victoria Furman